Car maker’s first hybrid assist mates an electric motor to the dCi 110 diesel engine; prices start at £25,055

Renault has opened order books for its Scenic and Grand Scenic Hybrid Assist models, which join their respective ranges with the most efficient drivetrain on offer.

Mating the dCi 110 1.5-litre diesel engine to an electric motor producing 10kW (13bhp), the two models are claimed to return up to 80.7mpg combined and emit 94g/km of CO2.

This beats the non-hybrid dCi 110’s economy by 8.3mpg and undercuts its CO2 by 6g/km.

The Hybrid Assist system is Renault’s first in a production car. It uses a 48-volt 150Wh battery that is located under the rear seats of the Scenic or in the spare wheel well housing of the Grand Scenic.

Alongside its efficiency improvements, it also boosts performance, with Renault claiming that the drivetrain has noticeably more torque than the non-hybrid diesel from 1000rpm. It offers up to 52lb ft of torque over the pure combustion engine dCi 110 Scenic.

2016 Renault Scenic TCe 130 Signature Nav review

The system can also recover energy during deceleration via its Motor Generation Unit, which it stores in the battery for use during acceleration.

The Hybrid Assist powered cars come with the same range of trims and finishes as the rest of the Scenic and Grand Scenic models, although no entry Expression trim is available. Twenty-inch wheels are standard across the range.

The base Hybrid Assist car comes in Dynamic Nav spec, which gets satnav, parking sensors and Renault’s R-Link 2 infotainment system. Above this, Dynamic S Nav and Signature Nav trims add features such as an 8.7in touchscreen infotainment system, leather seats and LED headlights.

Prices for the Hybrid Assist models are £1000 more than the equivalent, non-hybrid 110 dCi. This means a Scenic Hybrid Assist starts at £25,055 and the Grand Scenic Hybrid Assist starts at £26,855.

Renault Zoe at Shelsley Walsh

Our Verdict

Renault Scenic

The striking new Scenic's ride, style and effortless drive all offer serious appeal, but choosing the right engine is paramount

Join the debate


7 July 2017
so about a 10% saving on fuel alone for around £1000 extra. Being a diesel means it would take a bit longer to pay for itself over the normal diesel. At a guess 7'ish years to pay for itself for the normal motorist??
Of course I'm not allowing for the extra oompth and tax savings

typos1 - Just can’t respect opinion

Add your comment

Log in or register to post comments

Find an Autocar car review

Driven this week

  • First Drive
    23 March 2018
    Fully-loaded, big-hitting diesel CLS shows the potential perils of ticking too many options boxes on your order form. A good car with a bad suspension combination.
  • BMW M5
    First Drive
    22 March 2018
    Super saloon deploys four-wheel drive to improve every facet of its driving experience. Faster and more capable than any, and more exciting than most, of its celebrated predecessors
  • Range Rover Sport SVR
    First Drive
    22 March 2018
    More power and an intoxicating soundtrack have breathed new life into our love affair with the biggest, baddest Range Rover Sport variant
  • First Drive
    21 March 2018
    The new Vantage has been developed as a Porsche 911 beater, and our first taste on UK roads suggests it can live up to that bold claim
  • Nissan Leaf Tekna
    The is the new Nissan Leaf
    First Drive
    21 March 2018
    The new version of the world's best-selling electric car gains a bigger battery and more power. How does it compare to rivals such as the Volkswagen e-Golf?