Success of Cayman GT4 and freshly revealed 911 GT3 Touring package will encourage more simplified models
Julian Rendell
3 October 2017

The success of the Cayman GT4 was the spark for Porsche’s GT arm to create the 911 GT3 Touring package.

“The GT4 showed us there was demand for a pure driving Porsche with a manual gearbox,” said Porsche’s head of GT, Frank Walliser. “This theme of ‘pure and simple’ is a success in other fields too, like scrambler motorbikes and single-speed bicycles. People like simplicity.”

The £112k GT3 Touring Pack is on sale now with first UK deliveries expected in January next year. The model is not limited in production numbers and Porsche is keen to point out that, unlike other GT models such as the 911R, there is no allocation to sell out.

“Buyers just need to get a regular slot on the [GT3] production line. It’s not a limited-run car,” said a Porsche GB spokesman. Porsche is unlikely to apply the theme of a more focused driver’s car to lesser-powered 911 models.

“It doesn’t really work, because of the investment,” said Walliser. “A GT car drives like it does because all the suspension components are changed. And the investment has to be recouped with the price. You can’t downsize the idea of a GT car.”

Porsche provided further evidence that a successor to the GT4, the 380bhp Cayman, will also have six cylinders.

Since the GT4 was launched in 2015, Porsche has dropped six-cylinder engines from the Boxster/Cayman in favour of four-cylinder turbo engines.

Porsche is understood to be “very close” to making a decision to go ahead with a successor to the GT4.

Although company insiders won’t confirm that power will come from a six-cylinder unit, Walliser said: “We won’t do a performance four-cylinder.”

A performance 718 Cayman also defines the lower limit for GT cars in the Porsche range. “We wont go lower than a GT4,” added Walliser.

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Comments
8

3 October 2017

The Cayman GT4 was available long before the 911R so Porsche knew full well back then  whether there'd have been demand or not for a purer 911 but they cynically chose to sell the R at an inflated price knowing full well that the identical GT3 Touring was already in the pipeline. I can imagine the conversation "Let's build the GT3 Touring but firstly lets badge it as the R and make only 991 of them and sell each one for £150k. Then wait a few months and sell it as a series model for a lot less as the GT3 Touring". 

3 October 2017

I can't understand this notion that the 911 R and GT3 Touring are the 'purist's' 911s; they have a manual gearbox and no big wing. And that is it. The same wide body, wide tyres, 4 wheel steering etc etc...

A real purist's 911 would have a narrow body, standard Carrera wheel / tyre sizes, non-adaptive suspension.. You get the idea.

And btw, my local Porsche dealer says the Touring is, effectively, limited supply in the UK. I said I wanted one and they said they couldn't get me one.

3 October 2017
Big Jeff wrote:

I can't understand this notion that the 911 R and GT3 Touring are the 'purist's' 911s; they have a manual gearbox and no big wing. And that is it. The same wide body, wide tyres, 4 wheel steering etc etc...

A real purist's 911 would have a narrow body, standard Carrera wheel / tyre sizes, non-adaptive suspension.. You get the idea.

And btw, my local Porsche dealer says the Touring is, effectively, limited supply in the UK. I said I wanted one and they said they couldn't get me one.

I agree, it seems Porsche's idea of a pure car is different to everyone else's. The GT line-up of 911s are tracked focused with an emphasis on speed and downforce, so the suspension, bodwork and aero will be defined for that purpose. That's why the GT 911s have massiev tyres, wide bodwork and aero bits. Not really a purists car for the road. If Porsche really want a pure driving 911 in the sense as we all know it, like a Lotus Elise, then perhaps a Carrera 2 simply shorn of equipment and offering a manual box only would be the pure 911 for the road, perhaps just call it the S too like 1970's pure 911 of the same name.

3 October 2017

Cough...ahem.....the only pure driver's 911 that you can buy new is actually the 991.2 C2 manual with none of the rear wheel steer and nose-lifter shizzle.  And even that's too heavy by 50-70kg. Pure driving can be bi-turbo Mr Walliser....or supercharged....Not driven an Elise then of any kind ? Or Exige ?  This is all very disappointing ...AGAIN...  Take a C2, take out the electric motors for windows, seats and wing mirrors, invest in a set of forged alloys (which Porsche AG can buy at mass-economic prices), remove all leather and give us fabric seats and a manual box.  How does that make production difficult ?  It doesn't. Wake up AG.

BertoniBertone

3 October 2017

What does "regular slot on the production line" mean? Does that mean you regularly have to have a car being built?Because Porsche woouldn't sell me a GT4 and won't let me even put a deposit down on the next one because I'm "not a valued customer" for them. 

3 October 2017
Why is Porsche the only large manufacturer to have woken up to the reality that some people actually like the tasks involved in driving a car?

3 October 2017

Either Porsche are feeling the pinch,or, just another revenue stream for the Sheep.....?

Peter Cavellini.

3 October 2017
A strange bunch of angry posts today by people who can't take the hint that Porsche don't want their business.

But I'm not sure why we need to know this?

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