Petrol power arrives alongside new hybrid system, with promise of world-leading fuel economy
Sam Sheehan
27 February 2018

Toyota has developed a 2.0-litre engine that it claims is the most thermally efficient petrol unit in production.

The new four-cylinder engine is said to have a thermal efficiency of 40% – just 1% short of what the Toyota Prius offers with its 1.8-litre hybrid powertrain.

Toyota said the engine can achieve unparalleled levels of fuel economy as a result of new friction-reducing technology and more efficient exhaust and cooling systems.

It will be rolled out across Toyota’s new global architecture (TNGA) models in the coming years.

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The new 2.0-litre petrol engine, which peaks at 169bhp, will also offered with hybrid electric power. In this guise, it will match the Prius’s 41% thermal efficiency but offers more performance thanks to its larger capacity.

This hybrid powertrain is expected to be introduced via the upcoming Auris, which is scheduled for reveal at the Geneva motor show next week.

It will be one of two hybrid powerplants offered in the new Auris, with the existing 1.8-litre hybrid powertrain remaining as the entry point, albeit in an updated form.

The expanded hybrid line-up created by the new 2.0-litre engine should partially fill the void left by the departed diesel Auris. Toyota dropped the diesel version of the Auris last year amid low demand, with just 651 examples sold in 2017.

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Toyota has also developed a more efficient CVT gearbox that uses the world’s first gear drive for initial acceleration. This essentially gives the gearbox the quicker off-the-line response of a standard automatic but enables the higher efficiency of a CVT when moving.

Meanwhile, Toyota has created a torque vectoring system for petrol all-wheel-drive models that can decouple the front axle for pure rear-drive. This system will be introduced into Toyota’s all-wheel-drive and off-road models in the near future, with claims of improved fuel economy.

Toyota’s new technology comes at a time when it's about to make big changes to its UK line-up. The Japanese car maker looks set to replace its low-selling Avensis saloon with a new Corolla model.

Although it hasn’t been available in Britain for 11 years, the Corolla has remained on sale in other markets as a saloon. The new car will have strong technical links to the Auris, using the same underpinnings and powertrains.

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Comments
24

27 February 2018

All very well being more efficient, but, the torque figure is limp at best!

Peter Cavellini.

27 February 2018

Think that they have given the figure for the hybrid (Atkinson cycle) version - the figure for the non-hybrid version is more like 150lb ft. As a normally aspirated engine it won't compete with forced induction.

27 February 2018

What is the engine's efficiency when it is producing larger amounts of power at high rpm?

What is the engine's efficiency when it is warming up from cold? How long does it take to warm up?

27 February 2018

I raced rear wheel drive, front wheel drive and even had one rally in a 4wd Corolla. I really hated the name Auris and the fridge bland products produced under this moniker. Now they are going to shoot themselves in the foot again and ditch the reasonably well selling Avensis. I wonder which genious thought of all these mistakes?

what's life without imagination

27 February 2018

What exactly is the 1st "gear". Is it a physical cog?  I don''t understand the benefits surely the gearbox is out of "1st" immediatiely the car has gained momentum... Is this a sop to the self-described "enthuisasts" for whom a CVT 'box is anathema. Would thet be buying a Toyota anyway?

28 February 2018

It's a two speed gearbox (low and direct) mounted upstream of the CVT and provies a greater ratio spread.

jer

27 February 2018

Think i heard hybrid f1engines is 50% thermally efficient with Merc aiming for 1000hp. Some way to go yet Toyota.

28 February 2018
jer wrote:

Think i heard hybrid f1engines is 50% thermally efficient with Merc aiming for 1000hp. Some way to go yet Toyota.

but the engine alone will cost you over £100,000, last for only a few thousand miles  & probably only get 20mpg whilst doing it ...

apples & oranges :P

28 February 2018
jer wrote:

Think i heard hybrid f1engines is 50% thermally efficient with Merc aiming for 1000hp. Some way to go yet Toyota.

 

True but that figure does include MGU-H & MGU-K systems to improve its efficency. 

40% for a natrually aspritated engine is excellent. A 2% improvment from their 1.3 litre engine from 2014. 

28 February 2018
jer wrote:

Think i heard hybrid f1engines is 50% thermally efficient with Merc aiming for 1000hp. Some way to go yet Toyota.

That includes the benefits of hybridisation though.

The most efficient engines around are, somewhat surprisingly, huge two stroke marine diesels which get 50% or more. You're not going to see one of these in your car anytime soon though!

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