Tesla refreshes its entry-level offering with the all-new 70D replacing the two-wheel drive 60

Tesla has introduced a new-entry level version of its Model S.

The new Model S 70D replaces the S 60 as the starting point for Tesla ownership. 

The 70D has several improvements over the 60S. The 70D has a further 60 miles of range, is more than half-a-second faster to 60mph and has a top speed of 140mph, 20mph greater than the S 60. It is also has two motors, making it four-wheel drive, leaving only the single-motor 85 model as a two-wheel drive option. The new model is also capable of hooking up to roadside Superchargers as standard and has adaptive cruise control and sat-nav as standard; these were all cost options on the S 60.

The addition of this extra kit does nudge up the entry point pricing for prospective Tesla owners, however. The 70D starts at £54,500 - some £4,220 dearer than the model it replaces, once the government grant for plug-in cars is taken into account.

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Comments
21

8 April 2015
Base Panamera be afraid, very afraid.

 

Hydrogen cars just went POP

8 April 2015
Those latest Aluminum batteries look interesting. Light, cheap, don't ignite recharge time for a mobile phone 1-2 minutes. The last hurdle is voltage which is the same as Nickel but half of lithium. I wonder if Tesla are building the right battery factory!

9 April 2015
Walking wrote:

Those latest Aluminum batteries look interesting. Light, cheap, don't ignite recharge time for a mobile phone 1-2 minutes. The last hurdle is voltage which is the same as Nickel but half of lithium. I wonder if Tesla are building the right battery factory!

Yes I read with interest about the University making these new batteries. Just need to increase the AMPS but can charge an iphone in one minute as it stands. My only thought here is that Tesla and its Japanese partner have dumped a bucket full of money into the existing technology. That could prove to be its downfall. Technology moves far faster than bricks and mortar

what's life without imagination

8 April 2015
Looks great but the government subsidising a foreign built executive car costing over £50K with £5000 of taxpayers money when it's wrecking people's lives with things like the bedroom tax is totally shameful. I realise it's not just a Tesla issue and I really like it but the grant is disgusting.

TS7

8 April 2015
jmd67 wrote:

Looks great but the government subsidising a foreign built executive car costing over £50K with £5000 of taxpayers money when it's wrecking people's lives with things like the bedroom tax is totally shameful. I realise it's not just a Tesla issue and I really like it but the grant is disgusting.

Benefits claimants are wrecking the lives of hard working people.

8 April 2015
Not as digusting as the tax breaks the Oil companies are getting because the Oil price has fallen and the share holders are raking it in any more.

 

Hydrogen cars just went POP

8 April 2015
To be honest, it would sell just as well without the grant. It's an exceptional achievement and other car companies should be taking notice. Improvements in battery energy density and cost will only lead to further improvements and make Tesla more competitive. Any manufacturer not getting its act together pretty quickly will find it's completely left behind. How they will ever catch up with Tesla's technology and economies of scale in terms of battery related electric powertrain hardware I don't know.

8 April 2015
The P85D with its 'insane' mode is a lot of fun, and great for grabbing headlines, but this one is possibly more appealing, given that it will do the commuter and limo things even better. It makes the Panamera look like a dinosaur.

8 April 2015
That is a big jump in desirability and capability for the entry-level model. Staggeringly small price increase too, considering the four wheel drive, larger battery and that the supercharger access was about £2k anyway. I wonder if the added efficiency of the dual motor setup provides a lower cost range increase than adding more battery capacity?

I also wonder if this is about starting to clear space at the bottom of the range for the Model 3?

8 April 2015
It may cost a bit more than the variant it replaces, but it kind of offers more value for money in longer range, faster speed and the AWD.

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