Currently reading: New entry-level Tesla Model S revealed
Tesla refreshes its entry-level offering with the all-new 70D replacing the two-wheel drive 60
News
1 min read
8 April 2015

Tesla has introduced a new-entry level version of its Model S.

The new Model S 70D replaces the S 60 as the starting point for Tesla ownership. 

The 70D has several improvements over the 60S. The 70D has a further 60 miles of range, is more than half-a-second faster to 60mph and has a top speed of 140mph, 20mph greater than the S 60. It is also has two motors, making it four-wheel drive, leaving only the single-motor 85 model as a two-wheel drive option. The new model is also capable of hooking up to roadside Superchargers as standard and has adaptive cruise control and sat-nav as standard; these were all cost options on the S 60.

The addition of this extra kit does nudge up the entry point pricing for prospective Tesla owners, however. The 70D starts at £54,500 - some £4,220 dearer than the model it replaces, once the government grant for plug-in cars is taken into account.

Get the latest car news, reviews and galleries from Autocar direct to your inbox every week. Enter your email address below:

Advertisement
Advertisement

Find an Autocar review

Read our review

Car review

In theory, this all-electric luxury car looks a hit. So is it in practice?

Join the debate

Comments
21
Add a comment…
madmac 9 April 2015

I live in northern Canada

I live in northern Canada where the distances are much greater,1500km to the nearest major city.This car may be good in tiny UK [you can fit 8 Scotlands into Alberta alone!] and NY or LA but it is totally useless here.As for it being Green,where is the power coming from? Coal fired power stations?Since they nixed the clean nuclear ones!
Sporky McGuffin 10 April 2015

madmac wrote: I live in

madmac wrote:

I live in northern Canada where the distances are much greater,1500km to the nearest major city.This car may be good in tiny UK [you can fit 8 Scotlands into Alberta alone!] and NY or LA but it is totally useless here.

Totally useless? So the only journeys you take by car are over 200 miles each? You never drive anywhere but to the "nearest major city"? Surely you'd fly that sort of distance rather than driving?

madmac wrote:

As for it being Green,where is the power coming from? Coal fired power stations?Since they nixed the clean nuclear ones!

Presumably you have the figures to demonstrate that that's worse than refining crude oil to petrol and then transporting that petrol all the way to Yellowknife or wherever you live?

It's trivially easy to come up with a rare usage scenario that demonstrates the "uselessness" of any vehicle, but I don't see any merit in this sort of misery-Olympics.

AHA1 9 April 2015

Resale value?

I think these cars are fantastic but what's the depreciation like? Will they have any resale value in 2-3 years when battery technology etc will have moved on? Will they be 'updatable' to new battery types and will the cost be viable? What's the situation, anyone know?
Vertigo 9 April 2015

IRT AHA1

AHA1 wrote:

I think these cars are fantastic but what's the depreciation like? Will they have any resale value in 2-3 years when battery technology etc will have moved on? Will they be 'updatable' to new battery types and will the cost be viable? What's the situation, anyone know?

Regarding battery updates, you can actually upgrade the battery pack in a Model S right now (if you bought a 60kWh model and want an 85kWh, for example), but it doesn't come cheap - $18,000. They do continually provide upgrades for the older cars as battery technology improves - they're already doing it for the defunct Roadster (look for articles on the Tesla Roadster 3.0 upgrade), the tech's designed to be interchangable.

Regarding depreciation, it's hard to say. Looking at the cars for sale on the Dupont Registry in the US, they seem to be losing around 12% of retail price over the course of 2 years. Can't really assess the UK market yet, hardly any cars have been put up for resale so far, and they're listing on Autotrader for more-or-less retail price.

abkq 9 April 2015

There will always be those

There will always be those who are determined to hate electric cars (just as there are diesel haters, SUV haters etc.) But for long journeys it'll soon become second nature to have a coffee or meal break while the car charges up using a fast-charging point. For rental electric cars, I can imagine the driver who doesn't want a break to drop one car in a rental branch and pick up a fully-charged one to continue the journey straight away.

Find an Autocar car review