Firm's sixth electric model will pack two motors, exceed 400bhp and have a range of 370 miles
3 June 2019

One of ex-Mercedes-Benz chairman Dieter Zetsche’s final acts in power was to sign off on the firm’s sixth electric model: the EQE. 

The new upmarket saloon is scheduled to go on sale in 2022 and will compete directly with the Tesla Model S in terms of price. Details of the EQE have been cited in documents recently made public by the Chinese Ministry of Information and Technology in which the EQE is referred to under its internal codename, V295. 

The EQE is one of 10 new electric models destined for sale from Mercedes under its EQ sub-brand by the end of 2025 in a development programme already budgeted to cost up to €10 billion (£8.7bn). 

On top of this, the German car maker has announced the investment of a further €20bn (£17.4bn) in battery cell technology. Electric models are expected to account for more than a quarter of all Mercedes’ sales by the middle of the next decade. 

Zetsche said: “Our electric offensive continues to gain momentum. We are now taking the next step.” 

The EQE will follow the recently introduced EQC, next year’s new EQA and EQV, the flagship EQS and the recently confirmed EQB into Mercedes showrooms in the UK. 

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A sibling model to the larger and more luxurious EQS due out in 2021, the EQE will also be the second Mercedes to be based on the company’s new MEA electric car platform. Set to make extensive use of aluminium, it is designed to give future EQ electric models a flat floor structure for added packaging flexibility and what Mercedes insiders have described as “class-leading interior space”. 

One source said: “The EQE will be shorter in length than today’s E-Class but offer space comparable to the existing S-Class.” 

As our image shows, the EQE will evolve the shape of the upcoming facelifted E-Class with a focus on aerodynamic efficiency. It will adopt a face inspired by the rest of the EQ line-up, and is expected to sit lower to the ground with a ride height adjusting depending on the road conditions. 

The EQC, EQA, EQV and EQB are based around existing platform structures that are shared with, respectively, the GLC, A-Class, V-Class and upcoming GLB. 

Like the EQS, the EQE will be sold from the outset with four-wheel drive, with power coming from two electric motors – one mounted up front providing drive to the front wheels and a second driving the rear wheels. 

To broaden the car’s appeal, Mercedes is also considering a rear-wheel-drive version of its new EQ model, although it is unlikely to be made available until 2022, according to sources familiar with the company’s electric car strategy. 

Although it is still early days, power and torque are expected to eclipse the 402bhp and 564lb ft of the new EQC. 

Among the features being touted for the EQE are active air suspension and four-wheel steering, as well as safety features incorporated into Mercedes’ new ESF experimental research vehicle, including level three autonomous driving functions. 

Developments in battery cell technology are expected to provide the EQE with a range of close to 373 miles (600km). 

Production of the EQE is scheduled to take place at Mercedes’ new Factory 56 in Germany – the same site earmarked to produce the EQS. 

The EQE will also be produced at a new €1.5bn (£1.3bn) site being constructed by Mercedes in partnership with its Chinese joint-venture partner in Beijing at the rate of up to 70,000 units per year from 2022.

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15

3 June 2019
One of my favourite things about the line "go on sale in 2022 and will compete directly with the Tesla Model S" & similar statements from Jaguar, Audi, etc over the past two years.

Is that, it'll be competing with Model S tech from 2019, but in 2022 - when the Model S of 2022 will be much further ahead in actual real range & performance (but presumably still an interior that's not quite as good.)

A new Model S LR will do 370miles on a charge, so as usual, good to see the ICE manufacturers targeting the here & now rather than the future - and also no doubt from me that the EQE range is calculated from NEDC rather than WLTP just to keep them anywhere near relevant in that department.

As usual I look forward to the following comments ;)

3 June 2019
Tycoon wrote:

One of my favourite things about the line "go on sale in 2022 and will compete directly with the Tesla Model S" & similar statements from Jaguar, Audi, etc over the past two years. Is that, it'll be competing with Model S tech from 2019, but in 2022 - when the Model S of 2022 will be much further ahead in actual real range & performance (but presumably still an interior that's not quite as good.) A new Model S LR will do 370miles on a charge, so as usual, good to see the ICE manufacturers targeting the here & now rather than the future - and also no doubt from me that the EQE range is calculated from NEDC rather than WLTP just to keep them anywhere near relevant in that department. As usual I look forward to the following comments ;)

I think your assumed to realise that this new Mercedes will be up to date in 2022, and the assumption that Tesla will still be top Dog might not be then, indeed what with turndown turn in not just the car industry Tesla might not exist, I agree Tesla shook the Car World up but, you can’t go selling cars with dull soulless interior, the big screen thing isn’t all that now, and the mind boggling acceleration is old hat now, if Tesla concentrated on the interior more then they’d have more interesting cars, yes, I’m saying more interesting, they’re almost jelly mould cars, stamped out like Bottle tops, they, well at least, don’t get juices going, they don’t make me want one, that’s where other brands will score , they’ll have a desirable package which as I’ve said is where Tesla fall down.

3 June 2019
Peter Cavellini wrote:

I think your assumed to realise that this new Mercedes will be up to date in 2022, and the assumption that Tesla will still be top Dog might not be then, indeed what with turndown turn in not just the car industry Tesla might not exist, I agree Tesla shook the Car World up but, you can’t go selling cars with dull soulless interior, the big screen thing isn’t all that now, and the mind boggling acceleration is old hat now, if Tesla concentrated on the interior more then they’d have more interesting cars, yes, I’m saying more interesting, they’re almost jelly mould cars, stamped out like Bottle tops, they, well at least, don’t get juices going, they don’t make me want one, that’s where other brands will score , they’ll have a desirable package which as I’ve said is where Tesla fall down.

All subjective to personal taste of course. Personally, I'm bored of what BMW has been producing for the last 10 years, ever since Bangle departed. Just the same dreary design every year, but slighty tweaked. Only the 'i' division produce cars which look interesting. I'll give Mercedes the upper hand on Tesla for interior appearance, although Tesla have a more future-proof design for Autonomous driving and UI updates.

Will be interesting to see how this new Mercedes looks... Err, in 3 years. This announcement is premature.

3 June 2019

More Tesla hate from this guy, like all Mercedes don't look the same now.

The model s already has that 370 mile range today. Blah blah blah

As for the jelly mould shape, it's all in your mind.

As usual

3 June 2019

is that as more manufacturers have EV's on sale, the average customer will be able to walk into a dealership in virtually every town or city, and be able to see get the support they require, unlike Tesla, who may have a charging network, they just dont have a dealership network. 

3 June 2019
Citytiger wrote:

is that as more manufacturers have EV's on sale, the average customer will be able to walk into a dealership in virtually every town or city, and be able to see get the support they require, unlike Tesla, who may have a charging network, they just dont have a dealership network. 

too right, it especially wouldnt be hard to beat them on thier interiors not the tech but the quality and looks.

3 June 2019

With the backdrop of around 20 (and increasing) Tesla showrooms in the UK there's 2 issues here. The first one is a positive, If I save £2,000 off a £35k by not buying from a franchised dealership employing high pressure sales man then I'd willingly drive (not walk) the extra 50 miles once every 5 years.

The only real problem is repairs (potentially) but I'd take the risk of knowing it's still possible and is becoming less of a problem

3 June 2019

What is the point in these random speculative drawings of cars that Autocar is so fond of sharing with us?

 

 

 

 

3 June 2019

Makes us think that Mercedes, BMW, AUDI etc are on the brink of releasing hoards of BEVs very soon and we should wait before buying a Tesla.

3 June 2019
Its easy enough to put together and EV vehicle, plenty of parts on the market, even an upmarket one, there are small companies doing it in sheds right now. Easy when you can ask a high price. But to 99% of us its on no real life consequence. What remains to be seen is affordable vehicles being made in substantial numbers with the battery fabrication capability to sustain it. Only one manufacturer has got close to that yet.

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