New 1.8-litre engine with 240bhp and 100g/km of CO2 planned
6 April 2010

A diesel-powered Jaguar XF with CO2 emissions of just 100g/km will be in production by 2020, according to the company’s chief powertrain engineer.

Ron Lee said the plan will involve Jaguar dropping today’s V6 diesel powerplant for a 1.8-litre four-pot producing 240bhp, and driving a nine-speed auto ’box.

Future petrol XFs will get a four-cylinder unit of between 1.5 and 1.8 litres, expected to produce 170bhp per litre.

The cost of producing such engines could mean the 1.8 litre will need to be widely used to achieve economies of scale, and it could end up in Land Rovers.

Lee also revealed that much of the research into the engines will be carried out by Leeds and Loughborough universities.

JLR plans to mix fuel-saving technologies. Lee said that in 2020 over 70 per cent of XF sales could be made up from 100g/km models. Older, large-engined variants and hybrids would make up another 10 per cent each.

To get to the XF of 2020, Jaguar will introduce a new 2.2-litre four-pot diesel with stop-start and an eight-speed auto ’box. This combination will offer the same performance as the original 2.7-litre Jaguar V6 diesel, but with CO2 emissions of 150g/km.

A more efficient 2.0-litre version of this engine is pencilled in for 2016, with an upgraded turbo and low-friction internals. When combined with a new electrical power steering system and a ‘lighter’ XF body, it should emit 130g/km of CO2.

The final move to 100g/km will come in 2020, with the new high-power, 1.8-litre engine.

2020 Jaguar XF tech

Active aerodynamics

Low Cd figures are a must for future cars, so lots of work will go into reducing turbulence around the wheels. Active aerodynamics will involve moving spoilers and diffusers.

Nine-speed auto ’box

The new nine-speed auto could be connected to the car’s cooling system, to help warm the oil more quickly. This would reduce internal friction and load on the engine just after start-up.

Lighter body

Plans for a ‘lighter’ XF in 2016 are still shrouded in secrecy, but this could be the point at which the XF switches to an all-aluminium platform from today’s steel. If not, Jaguar could save weight by fitting all-aluminium doors and an aluminium boot lid.

Quieter drivetrains

“We’ll need to engineer very sophisticated dampers, engine mounts and absorbers for new engines and drivetrains,” said Lee. “We’ll also have to work on sound quality management to make sure the engine sounds good.”

Strong engines

The high-output four-cylinders will use new materials (including the block and bearings) and construction techniques (especially block stiffness and headgasket design) to cope with the massive stresses associated with huge power densities. “These engines will have to be mechanically very strong,” said Lee. Ancillaries can also be “placed more flexibly” because space is liberated through engine downsizing.

Friction reduced

Aside from low-resistance tyres, low-friction wheel bearings will have to be designed. Low-friction brakes, which do not allow the pads to drag against the discs, are also possible.

Advanced cooling

Cooling systems for the new engines will have to mark another huge step forward, says Lee. Thirty per cent of the engine’s output is lost in heat and dispersing this from a four-cylinder is more difficult than from a six-cylinder.

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Jaguar XF 2008-2015

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Comments
29

6 April 2010

Unwise to have a 10 year plan for diesel engines. I'm sure they will be banned worldwide by the UN by that time.

6 April 2010

[quote beachland2] Unwise to have a 10 year plan for diesel engines. I'm sure they will be banned worldwide by the UN by that time.[/quote] Don't worry. They'll see the light long before than and replace with a series of long-wheelbase slave-propelled versions.

6 April 2010

[quote beachland2]

Unwise to have a 10 year plan for diesel engines. I'm sure they will be banned worldwide by the UN by that time.

[/quote]

Interesting thought, Beachland. I think you are right that particulates and NoX are the sleeping giants as far as the next eco-drive is concerned.

However, as long as diesels hit Californian emission standards they should be OK.

Of course, we have a two pronged problem. The EU has been pushing Co2 emissions, while the US has been concentrating on pollution. Indeed, Co2 has just been catagorised as a poisonous gas in the US because it was only way to bring it under the control of the EPA.

I just wonder how SUVs can average 35UK mpg by 2016, if diesel suddenly becomes even less popular in the US? After all, it would be very difficult to meet SULEV (Super Ultra Low Emission [Pollution] Vehicle) regulations with a diesel engine.

6 April 2010

It could happen in a matter of months. All it would take is a non political scientific consensus reporting that in this era diesel pollution is more damaging than most other events on the planet, then the governments and UN will be forced to react to it. All the things that we see everyday now relating to co2 and carbon footprints were brought about by science reporting a concern about the warming effects of the gas. If they presented the "Diesel report" our everyday life would be full of daily news programmes, children's shows, school projects, public protests and riots about the murdering diesel drivers and industry polluters. Things would be quite different, but heading in a much better and enlightened direction.

The talk about diesel applications becoming cleaner is just selective beautification, new diesel mass produced engines are just as bad they always were.

I live between a DIY store and it's warehouse in town, they use forklift trucks that constantly run up and down between the sites, they are very noisy and they are smoky and stink to make you choke. The forklifts are 2009 models i saw them arrive brand new....

makes you think. the technological face of advanced diesel engines is a tiny minority when taken into perspective worldwide.

6 April 2010

So finally the 4cyl XF is on the cards... Look out BMW 520d! Just hope they price it right.

6 April 2010

[quote Autocar]

To get to the XF of 2020, Jaguar will introduce a new 2.2-litre four-pot diesel with stop-start and an eight-speed auto ’box. This combination will offer the same performance as the original 2.7-litre Jaguar V6 diesel, but with CO2 emissions of 150g/km.

A more efficient 2.0-litre version of this engine is pencilled in for 2016, with an upgraded turbo and low-friction internals. When combined with a new electrical power steering system and a ‘lighter’ XF body, it should emit 130g/km of CO2.[/quote]

BMW 520d: 181hp 129g CO2/km on-sale now.

Mercedes-Benz E250CDI BE: 201hp 129g CO2/km on-sale Sep 2010.

new Audi A6 2.0TDI ~200PS CO2 <130g/km launch Paris 2010.

Summary: Jaguar at least 6 years behind competition with gap likely to grow.

6 April 2010

This is the real future of diesel for the next five years or so:

on sale early 2011: diesel-electric hybrid E300 BLUETEC HYBRID. 4 cyl. 201hp diesel with 20hp electric motor, 69mpg, <110g CO2/km, BIK tax 10%.

6 April 2010

[quote nicksheele]

BMW 520d: 181hp 129g CO2/km on-sale now.

Mercedes-Benz E250CDI BE: 201hp 129g CO2/km on-sale Sep 2010.

new Audi A6 2.0TDI ~200PS CO2 <130g/km launch Paris 2010.

Summary: Jaguar at least 6 years behind competition with gap likely to grow.

[/quote]

2.7 jag v6 = 204bhp 199g/km

2.2 soonish = 204bhp 150g/km

2.0 2016 = 204bhp 130g/km

1.8 2020 = 240bhp 100g/km

for concise reading.

...........

Jags have 435NM torque, BMW 380NM. So it does balance out a bit.

6 April 2010

[quote beachland2]

2.7 jag v6 = 204bhp 199g/km

2.2 soonish = 204bhp 150g/km

2.0 2016 = 204bhp 130g/km

1.8 2020 = 240bhp 100g/km

for concise reading.

[/quote]

Interesting, and indeed concise. Thanks beachland2.

6 April 2010

[quote beachland2]1.8 2020 = 240bhp 100g/km [/quote]

Merc(BLUETEC HYBRID) 9 years ahead.

[quote beachland2]Jags have 435NM torque, BMW 380NM. So it does balance out a bit.[/quote]

Merc E250CDI BE 2,1 litre diesel: 500Nm(369lb.ft) torque. Fantastic 4 cyl diesel - now that they've fixed the injector problem!

Jaguar has released this corporate information to steady the nerves of Jag fans and spoil the release of the outstanding, key BMW 520d, due on-sale this summer. "Look, we've got so much in the pipeline! Don't rush off to BMW/Merc/New A6. Hold steady and stay the course!" Truth is, Jag are aeons behind the Germans with no hope of catching up. 4 cyl diesels make up around 80% of sales of exec class cars like the 5-series, E-class and A6, which Jaguar is being crucified with the lack of. Sales of the initially successful XF fell dramatically with the successful launch of the current E-class and the new 5-series, especially the 520d, will be the death-blow. Jag knows this, hence the desperation to wheel out the boffins to confound with whizzbangery by the Press dept. for damage limitation. They must be paying Carl-Peter Forster, JLR's boss, oodles of cash for his retirement pension, because he above all - ex-BMW - must know that trying to make Jag catch up to and sustain the technological pace of the Germans, off the back of sub 100k annual worldwide sales is a ridiculous task. Jag is not Porsche. Sorry Jag, the writing is on the wall.

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