Five-seat compact MPV is based on the i20 and will be launched this autumn; on sale 2011
16 April 2010

Hyundai will consolidate its strong position in the UK market post-scrappage with the launch of several new models in the next year, including this new five-seat MPV.

The new MPV, likely to take the firm’s ix badge used on its more spacious models, will be based on the i20 supermini and is the sister car to the recently launched Kia Venga. It is set to be revealed at the Paris motor show this autumn and will be on sale in the UK early in 2011, priced from around £11,500.

See the spy pictures of Hyundai's new MPV

Engines will be shared with the i20 and Venga, meaning 1.4 and 1.6 petrol and diesel powertrains will be offered. Styling is expected to be inspired by Hyundai’s i30-based HED-5 concept from the Geneva motor show in 2008, as well as featuring some of the firm’s new design language featured on the ix35 crossover, especially at the front end.

The launch of the new compact MPV, which is a replacement for the unloved Matrix, will be followed in 2011 by a larger seven-seat MPV based on the i30. This isn’t expected to be seen until next year’s Geneva motor show at the earliest. Splitting the two models will be the launch of the Hyundai’s new i40. This will reach the UK in March 2011 in estate form and will be followed that summer by the saloon.

Other new models planned by the firm include a comprehensive facelift of its popular i10 city car later this year, an all-new i30 in 2011/12 and its halo Veloster coupe this time next year. The radical ix-metro baby SUV concept from last year’s Frankfurt motor show is also tipped for production in 2012.

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16 April 2010

good price and no doubt like other recent korean models it will be a good enough everyday motor! cant fault the koreans lately

16 April 2010

Will reserve judgment on the styling but they seem to have really got the bit between the teeth now and are producing some above average cars that can compete on more than just price. Why do they get knocked as often as they do on forums?


16 April 2010

I do wonder why the Koreans insist on producing so many overlapping and identically sized models. Hyundai/Kia already have over 20 models on the market, most of which only compete against each other. Better to produce 4-5 brilliant models each and stick to consistent naming across the range and over time. If a buyer has to pour over 20 brochures trying to figure what each car is they'll get bored and buy a Focus.

21 April 2010

Re: Hyundai naming: not the ix20 or ix25 but the iM20 I would think. And the bigger mpv is likely to be the iM30. X is for crossover, I suggest, as in ix35.

24 December 2010

Well, silly old me! I should have known better than to impute logical sequence to Hyundai nomenclature. By my logic, the ix25 should have been a crossover on a longer chassis than the i20. Now I no longer have any idea what the i30 mpv will be named. Will it be the ix30 or ix40 perhaps, instead of im30?

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