Thierry Metroz says future cars from the fledgling DS premium brand will steer clear of the 'Russian Doll' styling adopted by some rivals
Richard Bremner Autocar
22 January 2016

The fledgling DS brand will launch cars with strong visual differences, rather than chasing the "Russian doll" design favoured by German car brands, according to the firm’s design boss, Thierry Metroz.

Speaking to Autocar, Metroz revealed that the French brand's “avant-garde spirit will be achieved through very different models. We will have a different silhouette for each segment, in order to maintain a surprise".

DS product boss Eric Apode added that the ambition is for “a DS to be recognisable from 100 or 200 metres”.

Of the current DS line-up, Metroz says the DS 5 is the most unique vehicle “because of its proportions”, with the car being lower and wider than its rivals and taking on an unusual "five-door coupé" layout.

DS models will also be recognisable by the new front end styling previewed by 2014’s DS Divine concept and subsequently applied to the faces of the DS 3,4 and 5. “This will be applied to all front ends,” said Metroz. The so-called double wings, which appear at the base and top corners of the grille, “will be evolved. Consistency is very important for a premium brand,” he said.

Of his broader ambitions for the fledgling DS brand, Metroz said that “the major thing is to be the brand ambassador of French savoir-faire,” meaning suavity, polish and sophistication.

Examples of this philosophy include the French pre-war carrosserie, coachbuilders who bodied aristocratic French makes such as Delahaye, Delage and Hotchkiss. Those manufacturers shut up shop in a post-war, austerity-driven France that culled its car industry’s luxury brands. “We would like to return to this,” said Metroz.

Read our full review on the DS 5 

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8

22 January 2016
Autocar wrote:

DS product boss Eric Apode added that the ambition is for “a DS to be recognisable from 100 or 200 metres”

It already is. People think "look, there goes a Citroen. What a crap car."

22 January 2016
Norma Smellons wrote:
Autocar wrote:

DS product boss Eric Apode added that the ambition is for “a DS to be recognisable from 100 or 200 metres”

It already is. People think "look, there goes a Citroen. What a crap car."

Not everybody shares a similar vulgarity of thought and expression!

22 January 2016
Norma Smellons wrote:
Autocar wrote:

DS product boss Eric Apode added that the ambition is for “a DS to be recognisable from 100 or 200 metres”

It already is. People think "look, there goes a Citroen. What a crap car."

Not everybody shares a similar vulgarity of thought and expression!

22 January 2016
The concept of DS or Déesse is meaningless without some clear design reference to the model on whose name it is built. Otherwise it's just another new and bland brand name with models having no design reference. Maybe this is why DS management have to keep trying to explain it (badly).

24 January 2016
rmcondo wrote:

The concept of DS or Déesse is meaningless without some clear design reference to the model on whose name it is built. Otherwise it's just another new and bland brand name with models having no design reference. Maybe this is why DS management have to keep trying to explain it (badly).

I'd argue that there is some clear design reference. Where do you think the 'shark' fins came from on the DS 3? The floating roof is also a nod to the original DS, and *not* the MINI as many people have wrongly assumed. In terms of the future design direction, I'm not sure - but I think we will begin to see a much stronger direction in Citroen's mainstream offerings, kicked off by the C4 Picasso and C4 Cactus.


"Work hard and be nice to people"

22 January 2016
" the new front end styling previewed by 2014’s DS Divine concept...will be applied to all front ends". Clair comme de la boue.

22 January 2016
That might work for a minimalist grille like the brilliant Citroen one (indeed, it did work for the current range) but the much bigger and more dominating grille seems likely to be rather restrictive about what car designs will work with it. None of the current designs have taken it well, and it doesn't even fit terribly well with the concept's lines.

22 January 2016
No money spent on engineering then, rather the important things like styling, I just don't get it.
Who would have thought 40 years ago a Golf GTD would be a more relaxing car over a DS5?

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