Two premium OEMs are in talks with Delphi for its next-generation full front-cabin gesture-control system
Jimi Beckwith
4 September 2017

Electronics company Delphi has developed and produced a next-generation gesture-control system that monitors both the driver and passenger in full. 

Recognised gestures control infotainment and other elements of the car in a large-scale upgrade to the current method of gesture-control detection, including higher-resolution cameras and more advanced gesture-learning technology. 

The company has produced two working prototypes of the system in preparation for its adoption by mainstream OEMs. The premium segment is targeted for the technology, just as it is with the more limited current system, and Delphi revealed to Autocar that two mainstream, premium brands have registered interest in the system. Executives from the programme stopped short of revealing them, but the brand has worked closely with BMW and Audi in the past. 

A peripheral system to the gesture-control technology is already in place on the new Audi A8 in the form of a driver state monitor, which in the near future will also feature on other OEMs’ models in the premium segment.

These systems, alongside a new type of display that has elements of 3D display work, can monitor the driver’s awareness - or potential blindness - of hazards and issues a warning if there is danger. This can apply if the driver is not looking in the right direction or is distracted by something in the car, be it a passenger, settings on the infotainment screen or other in-car distractions. 

Delphi is also aware of the large amounts of data produced by these detection systems and says the next task is teaching the car how to decipher what data is useful and what to discard. 

Once this is achieved, the data can then, with the driver’s permission, be passed on to insurance companies in exchange for lower premiums for the driver.

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Comments
4

4 September 2017

Knobs for jobs I say.

Basically manufacturers are trying new ways to raise the exclusivity and more importantly the price of their cars, especially the 'premium boys'. All you need is air-con, electric windows, air bags, DAB, central locking, sat nav./media screen, usb and maybe leather.  Automous, self parking, hand gesturers, autocalling of emergency services etc aren't for the masses they're for people with more money than driving ability! 

It goes someway to explain why Dacia and cheap Suzuki's do so well now. ICE cars are rapidly approaching their pinnacle and the R and D boys are bored.

 

Hydrogen cars just went POP

4 September 2017
xxxx wrote:

Knobs for jobs I say.

Basically manufacturers are trying new ways to raise the exclusivity and more importantly the price of their cars, especially the 'premium boys'. All you need is air-con, electric windows, air bags, DAB, central locking, sat nav./media screen, usb and maybe leather.  Automous, self parking, hand gesturers, autocalling of emergency services etc aren't for the masses they're for people with more money than driving ability! 

It goes someway to explain why Dacia and cheap Suzuki's do so well now. ICE cars are rapidly approaching their pinnacle and the R and D boys are bored.

I largely agree with you, except for the point about autocalling of emergency services. That could be a life-saver, irrespective of driving ability, especially for those regularly driving in remote areas etc

289

4 September 2017

I agree xxxx, I have never heard a friend/cplleague say to me I wish my car utilised 'Hand Gestures'.....my life would be so much easier!

This rubbish is going to be an expensive pain in the arse when the car is 5 years old, and potentially an MOT fail as well. I can see the customer demand going full circle and with the exception of the wealthy changing their new cars before the warranty expires, most ordainary people shifting focus to simple cars again as they get burnt by this unecessary tech on secondhand premium vehicles.

This doesnt bode well for premium retained values out of warranty.

4 September 2017

Creepy. Your car will be filming you, analysing what you are doing, and ratting on you to your insurers. Your insurers can already share whatever data they have on you. Soon they will monitor your every move. Went to a steak restaurant last night and ordered wine? Oh dear oh dear.

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