Facelifted MPVs start from £19,635 and £21,935 respectively; both get tweaked styling, improved tech and new personalisation options

The Citroën C4 Picasso and Grand C4 Picasso will go on sale from 1 September priced from £19,635 and £21,935 respectively.

Read our review of the 2016 Citroën Grand C4 Picasso here

Both models have been updated in their mid-life facelifts, bringing tweaked exteriors, more personalisation options and tech including a hands-free tailgate.

Design changes include a new front end, which is shared by both models for the first time, and '3D-effect' rear lights as standard.

Other new additions include a black two-tone roof for the five-seat C4 Picasso and a fresh range of wheels.

The facelifted cars come available in three trim levels: Touch Edition, Feel and Flair. Feel models gain standard 17in diamond-finish alloy wheels, while Flair models feature integrated roof bars and aluminium trim.

Both the C4 Picasso and Grand C4 Picasso now have a new Citroën Connect Nav system, which offers 3D, touch-operated and real-time navigation as well as voice recognition for nav, telephone and media functions and the ability to access and send texts and emails from the car.

Other tech includes hands-free tailgate operation and a number of safety systems including speed limit recognition, adaptive cruise control and active lane departure warning.

Top-spec Flair models get half leather interior trim as standard or optional full Nappa leather.

Two new engines have been added to the range. A 1.2 PureTech 110 S&S petrol with a six-speed manual gearbox, already seen on the C4 Cactus, is available on the C4 Picasso, while the option of a 1.2 PureTech 130 S&S, with a six-speed automatic gearbox, has been added to both models.

Our Verdict

Citroën C4
The Citroën C4 range comprises three diesel and three petrol engines, plus three trim levels

An admirable car, but there is an abundance of much better rivals

Join the debate

Comments
14

9 May 2016
Just be careful if you do order one with so called adaptive cruise. The Citroen one doesn't brake for you, just beeps at you to brake! So if you are used to more advanced systems this is very poor. Shame as I nearly bought one but after having had more advanced active cruise for 2 years now I wouldn't be without it on boring, busy motorway journeys.

 

 

 

9 May 2016
Are you not good at braking then ?

9 May 2016
In really old cars you had to manually adjust the ignition timing - then engineers improved that. Then you had to double de-clutch - then that was improved. Before seat belts you could brace yourself for crash, if you were very strong and lucky. Why not use new technology?

 

 

 

9 May 2016
I m not knocking new tech and I guess if youre used to the car braking for you then it may cause probs if you drive one that doesnt, so I see your point. But personally I wouldnt reject a car for that.

9 May 2016
typos1 wrote:

Are you not good at braking then ?

+1

9 May 2016
typos1 wrote:

Are you not good at braking then ?

+1

9 May 2016
typos1 wrote:

Are you not good at braking then ?

+1

10 May 2016
Flatus senex wrote:
typos1 wrote:

Are you not good at braking then ?

+1

Flatus senex wrote:
typos1 wrote:

Are you not good at braking then ?

+1

Flatus senex wrote:
typos1 wrote:

Are you not good at braking then ?

+1

Considering the amount of times you made this post, maybe you should consider automatic braking ;)

9 May 2016
What you're really looking for is the state of the art new tech with autonomous braking, accelerating and cornering. It's called a bus.

9 May 2016
I'd hoped the readers of Autocar would be more willing to try new technology! I love driving on twisty B roads (I also have a superbike) but on a motorway, just let the car do the boring stuff using adaptive cruise and steer (try a new Tesla!). If we didn't try new tech, we'd all still be living in caves!

 

 

 

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