Hot Land Rover spotted testing at the Nürburgring; it’s due for launch next year with a supercharged V8 engine

Land Rover’s Range Rover Velar SVR will launch next year as a supercharged V8 SUV brute to rival the BMW X6 M.

Using the same 5.0-litre engine as Range Rover Sport SVR, it’s expected to have 542bhp and 502lb ft of torque on tap, enabling a 0-62mph time of around 4.2sec.

We've now driven the Range Rover Velar - read our first impression here

Applying SVR weight-saving measures to the aluminium-based Velar should also bring its kerbweight down to about 1800kg. While still no featherweight, that would still make it a significant 465kg lighter than the hottest X6.

The Velar SVR will also get a unique chassis set-up that has been honed on the Nürburgring, as confirmed by a recent sighting at the famous German circuit. The set-up will be headed by new performance settings for the car’s standard-fit adaptive dampers.

The ‘Ring sighting also shows where the main aesthetic changes will be applied. Beneath the camouflage, the test car’s rear bumper looks to have gained a diffuser between two new exhaust exits, and it also has new, lighter wheels.

Along with the BMW X6 M, the Jaguar F-Pace SVR, which is due to launch this year, will be a rival from the same stable as the Velar. That car is expected to get the same V8 but in more potent F-Type SVR specification, meaning it’ll produce 567bhp and be capable of 0-62mph in less than 4.0sec.

Despite their similarities, the SVR F-Pace and Velar models will focus on slightly different areas of the market, with the Jaguar prioritising on-road performance and the Velar retaining more of its off-road ability.

Pricing will likely start at around £90,000 for the Velar SVR, making it more than £7500 cheaper than the larger Range Rover Sport SVR. The car is expected to be revealed early next year.

Range Rover Velar revealed

Our Verdict

Range Rover Velar

Fourth Range Rover model has abundant style but how much breadth of ability does the Velar really have?

Join the debate

Comments
20

24 April 2017
The Velar in the pictures show a pre production testing as it has proper handles rather then the concepts flush handles.

24 April 2017
Testing a Land Rover at The Nurburgring. How appropriate.

25 April 2017
People were questioning the point of developing and testing a Honda Civic type R dedicated hot hatch at the Nurburgring, if so how much 10 times over they should be questioning doing it in an SUV!

25 April 2017
I see Autocar is still peddling the fact the Velar is a rival to the X6 when it appears to be rival for the Macan and other SUVs in that class, which also includes the X3/X4. Although pricing wise the Velar SVR is massively more expensive than its rivals and, as the article states, is expected to be only £7500 less than the Sport SVR. The Macan Turbo is 'only' £70k while the GLC63 AMG is expected to be even less.

25 April 2017
complete the car it is only partially assembled for £70k think they may include door handles though.The Velar will be more comprehensively finished.

25 April 2017
The Velar SVR may be significantly more than the Macan Turbo or one of of the other pretenders to the SVR but pricier or not, the Range Rover will undoubtedly be miles superior to the Porsche and the other performance SUVs, especially when judged by other Land Rovers which are all class leaders my a country mile. Land Rover will be charging around £90k because it'd be worth the price and customers are willing to pay that much for class, style and all-round brilliance which the Velar SVR will undoubtedly have. Even on looks alone the Velar is worth the premium over the dull and ugly Macan, GLC and X4.

25 April 2017
Roadster wrote:

The Velar SVR may be significantly more than the Macan Turbo or one of of the other pretenders to the SVR but pricier or not, the Range Rover will undoubtedly be miles superior to the Porsche and the other performance SUVs, especially when judged by other Land Rovers which are all class leaders my a country mile. Land Rover will be charging around £90k because it'd be worth the price and customers are willing to pay that much for class, style and all-round brilliance which the Velar SVR will undoubtedly have. Even on looks alone the Velar is worth the premium over the dull and ugly Macan, GLC and X4.

Which planet do you live on? Class leaders by a country mile how? Their poor reliability, build quality or crappy tech?

We had a RR Autobiography (16 plate) and it was nothing but hassle, 9 miles in from new and it packed up - then endless issues. The courtesy cars were no better, with bits squeaking and falling off!

25 April 2017
Roadster wrote:

The Velar SVR may be significantly more than the Macan Turbo or one of of the other pretenders to the SVR but pricier or not, the Range Rover will undoubtedly be miles superior to the Porsche and the other performance SUVs, especially when judged by other Land Rovers which are all class leaders my a country mile. Land Rover will be charging around £90k because it'd be worth the price and customers are willing to pay that much for class, style and all-round brilliance which the Velar SVR will undoubtedly have. Even on looks alone the Velar is worth the premium over the dull and ugly Macan, GLC and X4.

Cricket on the green, long shadows on county grounds, warm beer, invincible green suburbs, dog lovers and pools fillers, “old maids bicycling to Holy Communion through the morning mist” and Shakespeare still read in school. Britain will rule unamendable in all essentials.

25 April 2017
You make a basic error of assumption that is made by many and that is that cars fit into predefined segments based on size. At the £20K price point, that is sometimes (but not exclusively) the case. Customers who have £20K in the bank, or £4K as a deposit may look directly at Focus / VW sized cars and make a choice based on predefined 'essentials' and 'desirables'. Marketing Strategy thinking in the 1980's suggested that this linear approach to segmenting was the best way to position your product or service. Not the case anymore.

The market is increasingly seen as a 3D-fluid 'existence' that changes constantly that can skew significantly when a benchmark product is launched. Therefore if you have £75K in the bank, the possibilities are considerably far ranging than if you have £45K. Some may test drive a Porsche Macan, an RRS, a Velar, an X6M, a top spec F-Pace, a Range Rover, a 7 Series, an S Class and make a decision based on the experiences of the test drive, the dealer, availability, comfort of the driving seat, economy...whatever Now, there will be some that conclude that each of those cars fits into a predefined DIFFERENT market. They don't - well not exclusively. They are all individual cars, with individual attributes, personalities, strengths, and they all vying for that £75K. Now, of course, there will be some customers that ONLY rest drive cars of the same size. AT the £75K point, that is rarely the case.

9 June 2017
Lanehogger wrote:

I see Autocar is still peddling the fact the Velar is a rival to the X6 when it appears to be rival for the Macan and other SUVs in that class, which also includes the X3/X4.

I understand your point, but it’s Autocar that is more accurate in their conclusions. Cars are no longer positioned in linear predefined categories, but are targeted uniquely in a 'fluid' market place that changes every day. If a customer has £100K on tap to spend on a car, there are immense possibilities and manufactures increasingly are developing cars with different characters and purpose rather than simply ‘of different sizes’.
Thirty years ago, when cars were inclined to be targeted in predefined, linear markets, BMW for example, offered a 3 Series, a 5 Series and a 7 Series, and you bought which one you could afford. They all had exactly the much the same character and the differentiator was the size – size of car, size of engine, size of the wheels, and as you went up, the price went up.
Not the case anymore. Car manufacturers are increasingly building uniqueness into each model. Buy a Range Rover for ‘luxury and refined capability’, buy a RRS for ‘agility and dynamism’, buy an Evoque for ‘distinctiveness and individuality’ or the new Velar: ‘the avante-garde Range Rover’.

Back to my original point. Whether you are Porsche or Range Rover – high value cars – it is the uniqueness of a car within a range that stimulates interest, and there will be many affluent, young, successful people who will look no further than Velar or Macan when looking for their car. The idea of ‘the richer you are, the bigger your car’ is no longer pertinent. It’s an aged philosophy and Range Rover know that Velar will often be test driven by those who’ve had an X6, a Cayenne, a Macan, an X3, a Range Rover, an RRS. Size is not the key – it’s the uniqueness of the design, the brand, the luxury – what that car communicates about the driver / family and make no mistake, the ‘avante-garde Range Rover’ is going to be one hell of a hit.

Pages

Add your comment

Log in or register to post comments

Find an Autocar car review

Driven this week

  • Skoda-Karoq 2.0 TDI 4x4
    First Drive
    16 October 2017
    Diesel version of Skoda’s junior SUV is unobtrusive and undemanding, but we’d still go for the silkier petrol version of the Karoq
  • Audi Q7 e-tron
    First Drive
    16 October 2017
    Expensive and flawed but this understated diesel-electric Audi Q7 has a lot to offer
  • Citroën C3
    First Drive
    16 October 2017
    Is the third gen Citroën C3 ‘fresh and different’ enough to take on its supermini rivals? We spend six months with one to find out
  • BMW X3
    First Drive
    15 October 2017
    A satisfying rework of the X3 that usefully improves its handling, cabin finish, space and connectivity to make this BMW a class front-runner again
  • Vauxhall Insignia Country Tourer
    First Drive
    13 October 2017
    Off-road estate is now bigger, more spacious and available with torque-vectoring all-wheel drive, but is it enough to make its German rivals anxious?