Updated off-roader gains new infotainment and improved cabin ergonomics

The Toyota Land Cruiser, recognised by many as the world’s most rounded off-road vehicle, is on sale in 2018 facelift form from £32,795.

The revised large SUV, which remains a left field choice in Britain (where 566 Land Cruisers were sold last year) in a class that includes high-selling models such as the Land Rover Discovery Sport, gets aesthetic and technical upgrades to improve its ergonomics and usability.

Its starting price leaves it £4440 more expensive than the Discovery Sport, but the Land Cruiser's clearer off-road focus arguably makes it the most rugged option in the segment.

Toyota is bidding to make it more luxurious so has added a new 8in touchscreen infotainment screen that houses the car’s multimedia system to the cabin. It is accompanied by a 4.2in multi-information screen and a new instrument binnacle.

Also added is a larger steering wheel, borrowed from the Land Cruiser V8 that is not sold in the UK (and remains popular in the Middle East), and front seat ventilation.

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The Toyota Land Cruiser is capable, but its rugged nature is better suited to Africa than the UK

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The car also now gets an electric heated windscreen and heated washer nozzles to further boost its premium credentials.

Minor aesthetic changes have been made to the exterior, including a new, slatted grille, and the car has also grown by 60mm in length, although the overall design remains recognisable.

British buyers will be offered just one engine with the Land Cruiser, a 2.8-litre turbodiesel producing 174bhp and 332lb ft. It will hit 62mph from rest in 12.7sec and has a top speed of 109mph. Claimed fuel economy is 38.2mpg, while CO2 is rated at 194g/km. Drive is sent to all four wheels via a six-speed automatic transmission.                                       

In eastern European markets the car is also available with petrol engines of 2.7 and 4.0-litre displacements.

Like its forebears, which stretch back 66 years, the new Land Cruiser retains a body-on-frame structure. Toyota says this boosts refinement by isolating the cabin from suspension jolts.

Ground clearance is 215mm for the five-door version and 205mm for the three-door.

Safety is boosted by Toyota’s Safety Sense system, which includes pre-collision prevention for both cars and pedestrian detection, adaptive cruise control, lane departure warning and automatic high beam technology. There’s also a blind spot monitor and a rear cross-traffic alert system.

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Comments
12

K_A

17 January 2018

I find it strange that the reporter is cross referencing the Discovery Sport with the Land Cruiser in this article. 

But for how much longer will Toyota keep updating this soon-to-be 8 year old model?

17 January 2018
Than a car in the class below. No sh*t Autocar. Why not remove your head from the JLR marketing board, this is a Discovery rival and therefore much cheaper. Doesn't compete with the full range though as this is the mid size Landcruiser not the full size one with V8's.

17 January 2018

£32,795 gets you a 3-door, 5 seat car. From Toyota's configurator, it looks like you have to go for the £52,295 5-door, 5 seat Invincible model to get the rear cross-traffic alert system mentioned in the article.

17 January 2018
pa1nkiller wrote:

£32,795 gets you a 3-door, 5 seat car. From Toyota's configurator, it looks like you have to go for the £52,295 5-door, 5 seat Invincible model to get the rear cross-traffic alert system mentioned in the article.

That should be 5-door, 7 seat

17 January 2018

The Land Cruiser is there for the taking if Land Rover get the Defender right..... No need to go for a body on frame approach though just because that’s what’s always been done. Just ensure it’s more capable, has a more modern interior and is robust....

17 January 2018
TStag wrote:

The Land Cruiser is there for the taking...

As I have put it to you before, WHICH Land Cruiser? You think the new Defender will be able to compete with this on price? Or with the 200-series on size and power? Or with the 70-series on utility and durability? Or do you think it will magically conquer all three?

17 January 2018

Everyone knows, if you ever want to go into the Australia’s outback, take a Land Rover. But if you want to come back again, take a Land Cruiser... that explains everything 

17 January 2018
ironrose wrote:

Everyone knows, if you ever want to go into the Australia’s outback, take a Land Rover. But if you want to come back again, take a Land Cruiser... that explains everything 

says a lot that land cruiser owners are a loyal bunch to tha car as well. It’s an appealing 4x4 (labelling it an SUV somehow does it down) I think the fact it’s an honest workhorse rather than Chelsea tractor is a big part of that. And boy do they hold their price well. There is a 2010 400k  mile ex highways agency car on autotrader so they absolutely will take the punishment

17 January 2018

Have to agree with ironrose and jamesf1. I am not a JLR hater, have never made a negative comment about them, but having travelled in Australia, Europe and North America, I agree the Land Cruiser is the default choice from an ownership perspective. I have a neighbour who bought his new in 2003, still has it, no issues whatsoever, and he tows off-road for business purposes on a regular basis. It's the US version, circa $90k. I accept that the Landie can sometimes be 'fixed' in the outback more easily due to it's less complex design, but the fact is the Land Cruiser does'nt break down in the first place.

18 January 2018
Boris9119 wrote:

Have to agree with ironrose and jamesf1. I am not a JLR hater, have never made a negative comment about them, but having travelled in Australia, Europe and North America, I agree the Land Cruiser is the default choice from an ownership perspective. I have a neighbour who bought his new in 2003, still has it, no issues whatsoever, and he tows off-road for business purposes on a regular basis. It's the US version, circa $90k. I accept that the Landie can sometimes be 'fixed' in the outback more easily due to it's less complex design, but the fact is the Land Cruiser does'nt break down in the first place.

The Landcruiser really has to be the beast of burden when it comes to "no breakdown enteratined" off-roading situations. Its a tad off the premium frills, but hardly needs such....as UN & RedCross have consistently proved. Its a utility kit.

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