New Toyota Team GB challenger, which will be driven by Tom Ingram, breaks cover at Oulton Park

The new Toyota Corolla that rising star Tom Ingram will campaign in this year's Kwik Fit British Touring Car Championship (BTCC) has had its first test outing, at Oulton Park.

The Corolla, which goes on sale as a road car in the spring, will be prepared by Speedworks Motorsport and entered by Team Toyota GB. Ingram is a two-time BTCC Independent class champion and battled eventual title winner Colin Turkington for the crown last season.

Ingram gave the car its first outing in a pre-season BTCC test at the Cheshire track today (Friday). The car ran in a testing livery. While the road-going Corolla will be sold in the UK with a choice of two hybrid powertrains only, the race car will compete in the BTCC with a 2.0-litre petrol engine due to the regulations.

The Corolla is rival for the Ford Focus and Volkswagen Golf in the road car market and its nameplate has a long history in the BTCC, with Chris Hodgetts winning back-to-back championship titles in a Corolla GT Coupé in 1986 and 1987.

Last season, driving a Toyota Avensis, 25-year-old Ingram scored three victories in the BTCC and he and the Speedworks team scooped both the Independent Driver and Team trophies in 2017 and 2018. He has had nine BTCC wins in his career so far.

The new Corolla will be joined on the 2019 grid by three examples of the new BMW 3 Series, which will be run by the West Surrey Racing outfit. Turkington will drive one of those cars.

BTCC organisers have outlined plans to introduce hybrid power to the series from 2021, having already moved forward a mooted 2022 start date.

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23

28 November 2018

How can a car with an engine that isn't even sold in the UK be allowed to compete. You may well say anything goes as long as the spectator thinks they could own something similar.  If it had been like this 30 years ago we'd never have had the chance to buy RS Cosworths.

typos1 - Just can’t respect opinion

28 November 2018
xxxx wrote:

How can a car with an engine that isn't even sold in the UK be allowed to compete. You may well say anything goes as long as the spectator thinks they could own something similar.  If it had been like this 30 years ago we'd never have had the chance to buy RS Cosworths.

Good point. Would also be nice to see some innovation and variation in power trains, like with Alfa then Audi in the 90s but I'd suspect rather than encourage variety and competion it would just scare manufacturers away on grounds of cost.

28 November 2018
xxxx wrote:

How can a car with an engine that isn't even sold in the UK be allowed to compete. You may well say anything goes as long as the spectator thinks they could own something similar.  If it had been like this 30 years ago we'd never have had the chance to buy RS Cosworths.

Good point. Would also be nice to see some innovation and variation in power trains, like with Alfa then Audi in the 90s but I'd suspect rather than encourage variety and competion it would just scare manufacturers away on grounds of cost.

1 March 2019
xxxx wrote:

How can a car with an engine that isn't even sold in the UK be allowed to compete.

That rules them all out then as none of these cars are sold retail like this (or all in as the engines are available for sale from engine builders if you have the cash).

Engines & transmissions are stipulated by regulations (along with lots of other things). All engines are 350+BHP 2.0 litre turbos. http://www.btcc.net/about/technical-overview/

These race cars bear only passing similarity to the road cars that they nominally represent.

 

2 March 2019
heidfirst wrote:

xxxx wrote:

How can a car with an engine that isn't even sold in the UK be allowed to compete.

That rules them all out then as none of these cars are sold retail like this (or all in as the engines are available for sale from engine builders if you have the cash)...

At least you can get 2.0 Turbo engines (or there abouts) and manual gearboxes in the A class, Focus, 3 series, A3, Honda civic, Astra.  

So at least there's a sporting version on the road with a similar layout which is the idea behind the format

typos1 - Just can’t respect opinion

4 March 2019
xxxx wrote:

So at least there's a sporting version on the road with a similar layout which is the idea behind the format

Is it though? There is no requirement to have a sporting version on the road. Why do Subaru run a Levorg then rather than a WRX STI? Indeed to take it further MG don't even appear to sell the MG6 in the UK anymore. Imo the idea behind the format is to have close racing by making the cars as similar to each other as possible in order to provide an exciting spectacle & thereby provide a good marketing opportunity for manufacturers > sponsorship £££s ...

Other than a body that resembles a model on sale & with a drivetrain layout (fwd, rwd or 4wd) the same as retail cars of that model the race cars bear very little resemblance to the road cars, they don't even have to use the production shell. Turbo, wastegate, intercoolers, ECU, dash & instrumentation, power management, gearbox, fuel tanks, clutch, diff., subframe, suspension & dampers, steering, brakes & wheels/tyres & more are all common, shared BTCC-specific items. 

Supposedly there will be a GR Sport Corolla (no extra power) but I wouldn't rule out a GRMN version with more power either.

2 March 2019
xxxx wrote:

How can a car with an engine that isn't even sold in the UK be allowed to compete. You may well say anything goes as long as the spectator thinks they could own something similar.  If it had been like this 30 years ago we'd never have had the chance to buy RS Cosworths.

Volvo compete and won with a 2.0 5 pot in the 850 and then S40, the 5 pot was never available in that S40, and the fast road volvos were turbo charged which wasnt allowed in the btcc.mondeo ran with a 2.0 v6 iirc which was only a 2.5 in the road car? I think there are loads of instances where cars and engines in race series don't match those of road going equivalents.

2 March 2019
si73 wrote:

xxxx wrote:

How can a car with an engine that isn't even sold in the UK be allowed to compete. You may well say anything goes as long as the spectator thinks they could own something similar.  If it had been like this 30 years ago we'd never have had the chance to buy RS Cosworths.

Volvo compete and won with a 2.0 5 pot in the 850 and then S40, the 5 pot was never available in that S40, and the fast road volvos were turbo charged which wasnt allowed in the btcc.mondeo ran with a 2.0 v6 iirc which was only a 2.5 in the road car? I think there are loads of instances where cars and engines in race series don't match those of road going equivalents.

You are going back 20+ years and those Volvo's were just bending the rules.  At leaast all the current  Audis, BMWs, Focus, Astra, A class out there at the moment have a sporty version on the road. Hats of the the Civic for instance

typos1 - Just can’t respect opinion

28 November 2018

Would've liked to have seen the saloon used as a base, is there an aerodynamic advantage to using the hatch? The vertical rear that most BTCC hatchbacks have now was found by Volvo, with their estates, to be suboptimal, and they moved to the 850 saloon.

1 March 2019
WallMeerkat wrote:

Would've liked to have seen the saloon used as a base, is there an aerodynamic advantage to using the hatch? The vertical rear that most BTCC hatchbacks have now was found by Volvo, with their estates, to be suboptimal, and they moved to the 850 saloon.

 

Probaby not as BMW are racing with the new 3 series saloon  this year I believe.. Hatchbacks is more about short whee base, size, tight control and quick changes in direction rather than aero advantages.. if anythign i think Saloons/coupes may have aero advantage

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