EuroNCAP starts testing stability control - Subaru Impreza and Alfa Mito criticised
24 March 2010

Safety organisation EuroNCAP has begun testing stability control systems on cars.

The initial 40 cars tested all passed the test, although the Subaru Impreza and Alfa Romeo Mito were criticised.

The Impreza drew criticism because it thought the system could be knocked off accidentally without the driver realising.

EuroNCAP also noted that when the Alfa Romeo Mito’s three-mode steering system – DNA – was set to Dynamic mode, the car failed the test.

Robot-driven vehicles were subjected to a double lane change at 50mph to determine the effectiveness of the ESC system.

UK based research concluded that vehicles featuring ESC were 25 per cent less likely to be involved in a fatal crash - the equivalent of approximately 380 fatalities per year.

Alex Kersten

Twitter - follow autocar.co.uk

Our Verdict

Alfa Romeo Mito

The Alfa Romeo Mito is a usable, fun package, but the DNA system frustrates

Join the debate

Comments
26

24 March 2010

So yet again the motor companies will feel pressured to change the make-up of their vehicle's DNA.

People who buy sports cars accept the responsibility that comes with it. They don't require a nanny and NCAP should consider that fact and understand the difference between better safety and killing the Auto Industry in the pursuit of it..

24 March 2010

[quote WooDz]So yet again the motor companies will feel pressured to change the make-up of their vehicle's DNA.

People who buy sports cars accept the responsibility that comes with it. They don't require a nanny and NCAP should consider that fact and understand the difference between better safety and killing the Auto Industry in the pursuit of it..[/quote]

For those can read and who understood this news item it said the Alfa Romeo Mito failed the commonly-called Elk test, when it was in its most 'sporting' setting of its 'DNA' system. Let's now see all the Alfa fanboys come on here and defend this deathtrap.

Once Alfas had inherent safety - they rusted away and failed mechanically before having a chance to drive them. The modern Alfa has moved on so much that it'll kill you if you drive it more briskly than a motability car.

The original infamous failed Elk test effectively killed off the Mercedes A-class. Will the motoring press conduct such a hue and cry against one of its la-dolce-vita darlings? Of course not. Good, go ahead and buy Mitos en masse. What better way to rid the gene pool of such sh!te DNA.

24 March 2010

[quote nicksheele]

Let's now see all the Alfa fanboys come on here and defend this deathtrap.

Once Alfas had inherent safety - they riusted away and failed mechanically before having a chance to drive them. The modern Alfa has moved on so much that it'll kill you if you drive more briskly than a pensioner.

[/quote]

I presume your tongue was firmly in your cheek when you wrote that...

24 March 2010

[quote Uncle Mellow]I presume your tongue was firmly in your cheek when you wrote that...[/quote]

you're right, there are some brisk pensioners, like Stirling Moss, Nigel Mansell and Jenson Button, which is why I changed it on edit to a motability car, like those blue 3-wheelers.

But seriously, the Mito failed the Elk test. That's the standout headline and should have been Autocar's too. The A-class died at the hands/hooves of the Elk. Work out the rest for yourself.

24 March 2010

[quote nicksheele]

[quote Uncle Mellow]I presume your tongue was firmly in your cheek when you wrote that...[/quote]

you're right, there are some brisk pensioners, like Stirling Moss, Nigel Mansell and Jenson Button, which is why I changed it on edit to a motability car, like those blue 3-wheelers.

But seriously, the Mito failed the Elk test. That's the standout headline and should have been Autocar's too. The A-class died at the hands/hooves of the Elk. Work out the rest for yourself.

[/quote]

Well, first let's clarify levels of failure. The A-Class ROLLED when it underwent the Elk test, that's what killed it.

Also, it failed the stability test because the stability control was at it's most lax setting (allowing some slip); hence why it failed. In normal mode, it is unlikely it would've failed.

Presumably you were also tongue-in-cheek about it being a deathtrap as well? Since it handles better than a lot of other hatchbacks on the road (even new ones) and is crammed with safety features and airbags.

24 March 2010

[quote Ubizzle]

[quote nicksheele]

[quote Uncle Mellow]I presume your tongue was firmly in your cheek when you wrote that...[/quote]

you're right, there are some brisk pensioners, like Stirling Moss, Nigel Mansell and Jenson Button, which is why I changed it on edit to a motability car, like those blue 3-wheelers.

But seriously, the Mito failed the Elk test. That's the standout headline and should have been Autocar's too. The A-class died at the hands/hooves of the Elk. Work out the rest for yourself.

[/quote]

Well, first let's clarify levels of failure. The A-Class ROLLED when it underwent the Elk test, that's what killed it.

Also, it failed the stability test because the stability control was at it's most lax setting (allowing some slip); hence why it failed. In normal mode, it is unlikely it would've failed.

Presumably you were also tongue-in-cheek about it being a deathtrap as well? Since it handles better than a lot of other hatchbacks on the road (even new ones) and is crammed with safety features and airbags.

[/quote]

Ah, the first of the Alfa fanboys emerges. Question: where does it say in the news item that the Mito did not roll? It did not say that. So you cannot say or imply that it did not.

Second, I'm sure normal people, as opposed to borderline psycho Alfa-slavering ones, will be delighted to hear that only one of the three - D-N-A - modes is likely to send the car out of control at everyday speeds. That'll be a great reassurance; perhaps worthy of Alfa putting it in its advertisement material as an endorsement?: 'As tested by Europe's leading independent safety body the Mito has been demonstrated to be 66.6% safe...'.

This is a disaster for Alfa - letting a car out onto the market, which would be known to fail the now 12 year old standard Elk test, especially a car which trades on its 'sporting' ethos and one where many owners would be expected to use the 'D' mode more than typical. No wonder Autocar buried such an important news item in such an innocuous heading. Don't want to upset Fiat Group's advertising budget do we.

24 March 2010

Obviously Nicksheele is on the path to wind people up...

I couldn't give a rats arse about Alfa personally but I get annoyed when some association thinks that all cars should come out the box in super restricted mode, regardless of whether it goes against the company's brand ideology. My comment above was pointing out that we have a manufacture who's CI is based on performance.

The only thing that will send a car spinning out of control is not the ESP,ABS,BFD or TCS; it's the driver. Stationary cars don't crash. The ESP setting on the MiTo has a different default setting. That doesn't make it unsafe.

I guess people have forgot we didn't used to have ABS or ESP or even power steering. Either that or some here are not old enough to remember the time when cars were actually cars.

24 March 2010

So the ESP 'off'(ish)' button on the MiTo is dressed up as a fancy DNA button - did they test all the other cars with their ESP swiched to 'off' too?? I'm guessing not...

The default setting is Normal - all safety systems engaged. And it reverts to this when the car is started. It passed the test in Normal. So what is the issue here???

Dont all these cars use the same Bosch ESP systems anyway?

24 March 2010

[quote WooDz]Obviously Nicksheele is on the path to wind people up...[/quote]

This amuses me how some people rant and rave about "sh!te" Alfa Romeo products and about the borderline-psycho-slavering-Alfa-fanboys who defend the brand. They are usually the ones who feel it necessary to make the first move by making a denigrating comment about Alfa Romeo products in the first place; setting the scene for those loyal to the brand to respond. Every action has an equal and opposite reaction does it not? But I suspect getting a reaction is the entire point of the post though, isn't it?

I can't help but doubt that it is the 'real' Nick Scheele (former President and Chief Operating Officer for Ford) posting on Autocar. It's probably just a total coincidence that this is the name being used and nothing to do with Ford fans whatsoever.

24 March 2010

Here we go again, electronic brains take the place of the driver.

Is it any wonder most drivers these days have their brains in neutral when driving, when the cars sort out most problems for them.

And before anyone asks , yes my last car had all the gismo's,

I most enjoyed using the car when they were all switched off.

These gizmo's all rely on the tyres and brakes to control the car, but once the tyres have lost grip, you will be joining the hedge, no matter what systems you have, and because the driver is relying on the systems to get him out off trouble, it will usually be a big crash. Oh and when it is really slippery (ie in the snow etc) because the tyres have no grip, the systems are c**p. Just look at all the cars sliding and spinning in the recent weather.

We actually need to get rid of these systems and improve driver training, then we will see a big reduction in accidents.

Technology is not always the answer.

Pages

Add your comment

Log in or register to post comments

Find an Autocar car review

Driven this week

  • Lexus LC500
    Car review
    20 October 2017
    Futuristic Lexus LC coupé mixes the latest technology with an old-school atmospheric V8
  • Maserati Levante S GranSport
    First Drive
    20 October 2017
    Get ready to trade in your diesels: Maserati’s luxury SUV finally gets the engine it’s always needed
  • Jaguar XF Sportbrake TDV6
    First Drive
    19 October 2017
    The handsome Jaguar XF Sportbrake exhibits all the hallmarks that makes the saloon great, and with the silky smooth diesel V6 makes it a compelling choice
  • Volkswagen T-Roc TDI
    First Drive
    19 October 2017
    Volkswagen's new compact crossover has the looks, the engineering and the build quality to be a resounding success, but not with this diesel engine
  • BMW M550i
    First Drive
    19 October 2017
    The all-paw M550i is a fast, effortless mile-muncher, but there's a reason why it won't be sold in the UK