Jaguar Land Rover is planning a system that will be able to identify – and even avoid – potholes on the road
10 June 2015

Jaguar Land Rover is developing technology that will allow a car to spot and react to a pothole in the road.

The technology can currently identify the presence of a hole, a loose manhole cover or a broken drain in the road, and adjust the suspension to lessen the impact and keep the car riding as smoothly as possible.

It uses sensors positioned under the vehicle to profile the road and the car then continuously adjusts the suspension as required.

Currently the research vehicles can recognise a hole only when they have driven over it, but the next stage of the process, says JLR, is to identify potholes before the car gets near them and automatically guide the car around them without leaving its lane. This would be done via a forward-facing stereo digital camera, which would scan the road ahead. If the hole was severe enough, the system could slow or even stop the car to minimise the impact.

This information could then be shared with other vehicles and even the local authorities to enable them to fix the problem as soon as possible. An image and a GPS location could be sent to help repairs take place swiftly. JLR's research team is working closely with Coventry City Council to explore the possibilities.

Potholes are estimated to cause around £2.8 billion of damage to cars per year.

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Comments
11

10 June 2015
Probably not, we've had an abandoned RR Sport at the end of our road for a week with its front wheel hanging off having mounted a curb. Also, given the state of our roads these cars would be all over the place. I did the Tour of Cambridge road bike race at the weekend which was made up of 84 miles of luna landscape. I wish I'd done it on my mountain bike...

jer

10 June 2015
the front wheel is hanging off as a result of mounting a kerb. Well done for managing the tour of Cambridge. I suppose a flat ride round Cambridge wouldn't sound as impressive.

10 June 2015
So, when my vehicle automatically swerves to avoid a pothole and sideswipes a cyclist on my nearside, or a lane splitting motorcycle (A.K.A. a moron) on my right, who gets the careless driving ticket, me or Jaguar Land Rover?

 

10 June 2015
Would it be good to get the reliability and quality right first before coming up with fanciful headline sound bites?

289

10 June 2015
LOL, my thoughts exactly!

10 June 2015
You beat me to it. Get rid of all the niggly issues we read about on the RRS forums first, then a) I might be interested in buying one, and b) we can all start being interested on not quite feeling the potholes so much. Until then, Porsche will still be cashing my cheques.

10 June 2015
Cobnapint wrote:

You beat me to it. Get rid of all the niggly issues we read about on the RRS forums first, then a) I might be interested in buying one, and b) we can all start being interested on not quite feeling the potholes so much. Until then, Porsche will still be cashing my cheques.

Mentioning a Jaguar or Land Rover with niggles on an Autocar page? Your post will be ripe for deletion!

10 June 2015
Will this be like lane departure systems, the ones that journos report don't work very well and are best turned off? Clever, but not clever enough.

10 June 2015
Why not design better road surfaces that do not result in pothole so readily. The state of our roads compared to that of other countries with better roads should be looked at. Cars should not have to drive for us. We should all be taught to a standard of driving that enables us to get from any point A to any point B safely.

10 June 2015
So, basically doing what Mercedes developed some 15 years ago and have already introduced then; Magic Body Control/Ride. Minus the swerve and mow down a cyclist or have a head on collision with another vehicle feature of course.

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