Currently reading: Hardcore Aston Martin Rapide AMR climbs Goodwood hill with 595bhp V12
Model gets uprated power, retuned suspension and optimised aerodynamics
Sam Sheehan
News
2 mins read
13 July 2018

The hardcore Aston Martin Rapide AMR, which has taken to the Goodwood hill climb, will be the last hurrah for the four-door saloon before it goes off sale in 2020.

It is the second model this year from Aston’s burgeoning AMR performance sub-brand; the DB11 AMR was unveiled last month.

The £194,950 Rapide AMR — costing £45,450 more than the standard Rapide S — closely echoes the concept shown at the Geneva motor show in 2017, with a front grille reminiscent of the track-only Vantage AMR Pro and circular daytime running lights similar to recent Zagato models.

The AMR variant keeps the same 0-60mph time as the standard Rapide S at 4.2sec and shares the same naturally aspirated 6.0-litre V12 engine with 465lb ft of torque, but it gets uprated power from 545bhp to 595bhp.

Top speed is 205mph, making it 2mph faster than the Rapide S.

The increase in power is achieved by enhanced airflow to the engine as a result of larger inlet manifolds as well as new engine and gearbox calibration.

The Rapide AMR also has retuned suspension and optimised aerodynamics. 

Extra aerodynamic bodywork includes carbonfibre splitter, sills, rear diffuser and bootlid lip spoiler. A new bonnet with large ventilation insets is also made of carbonfibre.

The Rapide AMR sits 10mm lower than the Rapide S and its adaptive dampers have been re-engineered to be “more focused, agile and dynamic”, said Aston

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The Aston Martin Rapide is beautifully styled and brilliantly accomplished

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It also gets new carbon-ceramic brakes and 21in wheels — a first for Aston — paired with Michelin Super Sport tyres designed to aid brake cooling. 

The brakes measure 400m at the front with six-piston calipers and 360mm at the rear with four-piston calipers. To further aid brake cooling, the Rapide AMR uses a version of the Vanquish S’s cooling system with modified brake ducts and dust shields.

There are three design schemes: Standard, Silhouette and Signature. The latter gets Stirling Green paint with lime accents and stripe, drawing the closest visual link to the livery of Aston race cars.

Inside, there is a full-length carbonfibre centre control and the seats are made with Alcanatara — both firsts for a Rapide. Each car gets AMR logos stitched into the seats and a limited-edition AMR plaque on the carbon sills.

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Talking about the model, Aston boss Andy Palmer said its “enhanced performance, sharper dynamics and more powerful design language… has taken Rapide to new and exciting extremes”. 

The Rapide AMR has a limited production of 210 cars. First customer deliveries are in autumn.

The Rapide S is expected to go off sale in 2020 and will be indirectly replaced by Aston’s first SUV, the DBX.

Read more

Aston Martin Rapide review 

Aston Martin Vantage review 

Aston Martin DB11 review

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Peter Cavellini 13 June 2018

Racing colours.........

 That’s the Aston racing livery, has been for quite a while.....sigh.

scrap 13 June 2018

Is the electric Rapide dead

Is the electric Rapide dead then?

Symanski 13 June 2018

Electric Rapid.

scrap wrote:

Is the electric Rapide dead then?

 

My understanding of it was that Williams (F1) were doing the engineering on it, but it was a cobbled together mix of F1 battery and electric motor.   It reminded me of the Masserati they did on Wheeler Dealers (search YouTube) where Edd sourced the parts, including some from wreched Teslas, to put in to a car which had already been partly modified.

 

If you look at the electric cars today they're so much more advanced than this.   The electric Rapide came far too late and extremely poorly conceived as a modification of an existing car rather specifically designed to be electric.

 

scrap 13 June 2018

Symanski wrote:

Symanski wrote:

scrap wrote:

Is the electric Rapide dead then?

 

My understanding of it was that Williams (F1) were doing the engineering on it, but it was a cobbled together mix of F1 battery and electric motor.   It reminded me of the Masserati they did on Wheeler Dealers (search YouTube) where Edd sourced the parts, including some from wreched Teslas, to put in to a car which had already been partly modified.

 

If you look at the electric cars today they're so much more advanced than this.   The electric Rapide came far too late and extremely poorly conceived as a modification of an existing car rather specifically designed to be electric.

 

 

Cheers.

I suppose if it’s not going to be competitive then they are right to pull it. I note the DBX was hyped as an electric concept too but they seem to have rolled back on that.

 

Mikey C 13 June 2018

Surprised that this is still

Surprised that this is still in production, considering the DB9 was replaced 2 years ago. 

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