McLaren reveals power, torque and CO2 emission data for the new McLaren P1 hypercar
Mark Tisshaw
20 February 2013

The hybrid powertrain in the new McLaren P1 hypercar will produce 903bhp and emit less than 200g/km of CO2, the company has revealed. Power will come from a mid-mounted twin-turbocharged 3.8-litre V8 producing 727bhp at 7500rpm and a 176bhp electric motor mounted directly onto the engine.

McLaren also confirmed the P1 engine’s torque figure of 531lb ft at 4000rpm and the electric motor’s instantly available 192lb ft. Peak combined torque of 664lb ft arrives at 4000rpm.

The electric motor’s 176bhp is also available instantly through a specially developed boost system called Instant Power Assist System (IPAS). It is operated by a steering wheel-mounted button and, McLaren says, gives the car the throttle response of a normally aspirated engine.

The engine, which is a revised version of the M838T unit from the MP4-12C, and electric motor drive the rear wheels through a seven-speed dual-clutch automatic gearbox. The P1 will be able to cover up to six miles on electric power alone, drawing on a 96kg battery pack described as having a greater energy density than that of any other car’s.

The battery is mounted on the underside of the P1’s carbonfibre chassis. It can be fully charged in two hours using a plug-in charger that’s stored in the car’s luggage compartment.

McLaren has also confirmed the P1 will feature a Formula 1-inspired Drag Reduction System (DRS) . The DRS, which is operated by a button on the steering wheel, can reduce the rear wing’s angle to lower drag by up to 23 per cent at higher speeds.

Autocar has produced digital books on the McLaren P1 hypercar as well as the F1 and 12C supercars.

Download the McLaren F1 digital edition.

Download the McLaren P1 digital edition.

Download the McLaren 12C digital edition.

Our Verdict

McLaren P1

The stakes couldn't be higher, so has the P1 risen to the challenge?

Join the debate

Comments
24

20 February 2013

Just when you thought the power output might not be as great as initially suggested.....McLaren reveal this!

20 February 2013

With other hybrids, it's been advised that you can't simply add the peak outputs of the two motors together because the car never has both operating at peak load simultaneously. Maybe the P1 works differently.

Either way, I agree that they've played quite a cute game here as the figure is considerably higher than speculated. 

20 February 2013

Well if this the future of Hybrids bring it on.  So a new hot hatch is quicker than an 90's performance car bring on the 2030's.

20 February 2013

...thought the new Macca was underpowered as a 918/F150 rival; great reveal McLaren!

"Why is http://www.nanoflowcell.com not getting more media attention? It could be the future... Now!"

TBC

20 February 2013

Ah well, the Ferrari fan boys will have to find something else to moan about now................

21 February 2013

TBC wrote:

Ah well, the Ferrari fan boys will have to find something else to moan about now................

 

Anyone who uses the term "fan boy" is either under 16, or a retard. Which one describes you TBC?

20 February 2013

Porsche were being typically conservative with their estimates......

"Why is http://www.nanoflowcell.com not getting more media attention? It could be the future... Now!"

20 February 2013

Right about now would be a great time to win the loto  

20 February 2013

"The P1 will be able to cover up to six miles on electric power alone"

Very devious! especially as the electric motor has enough power to  make the car reach the required CO2 tests speeds without needing the engine, the CO2  test cycle is only 6.8 miles so the quoted 200g/km is with the engine ticking over for only about half a mile! real figure is probably still astronomical.

21 February 2013

The Apprentice wrote:

quoted 200g/km is with the engine ticking over for only about half a mile! real figure is probably still astronomical.

Assuming that they can complete one test cycle purely on eletric power (which I'm sure is the plan) then the fuel comsumption over the normal European drive cycle with the engine running is around 290g/km - so about 22.5mpg.

Pages

Add your comment

Log in or register to post comments

Find an Autocar car review

Driven this week

  • Skoda-Karoq 2.0 TDI 4x4
    First Drive
    16 October 2017
    Diesel version of Skoda’s junior SUV is unobtrusive and undemanding, but we’d still go for the silkier petrol version of the Karoq
  • Audi Q7 e-tron
    First Drive
    16 October 2017
    Expensive and flawed but this understated diesel-electric Audi Q7 has a lot to offer
  • Citroën C3
    First Drive
    16 October 2017
    Is the third gen Citroën C3 ‘fresh and different’ enough to take on its supermini rivals? We spend six months with one to find out
  • BMW X3
    First Drive
    15 October 2017
    A satisfying rework of the X3 that usefully improves its handling, cabin finish, space and connectivity to make this BMW a class front-runner again
  • Vauxhall Insignia Country Tourer
    First Drive
    13 October 2017
    Off-road estate is now bigger, more spacious and available with torque-vectoring all-wheel drive, but is it enough to make its German rivals anxious?