First-time offenders could be banned from driving with revised penalties that award six points

Drivers caught using their mobile phones behind the wheel could lose their licence under new rules that come into force today.

The Government’s zero-tolerance regulations drop the option for offenders to go on a remedial driving course, while the lowest penalty will be six points on their licence – double the current punishment.

The plans also double fines from £100 to £200.

Here's why you shouldn't use your mobile phone behind the wheel

While the number of drivers in the UK caught on their phones has decreased by 84% since 2011, Prime Minister Theresa May said when the laws were proposed last year that she wants the act to become socially unacceptable.

The Government’s plans were revealed revealed late last year, three months after a family of four was tragically killed in a road accident on the A34 after a lorry driver crashed into their car while looking at his mobile phone.

Many of the UK’s leading voices in road safety have since expressed concern for the continued use of phones behind the wheel. Ian Gallagher, the Freight Transport Association (FTA)’s head of driver and vehicle licensing policy, saying “Vocational drivers risk their livelihood as many of our members already have in place a zero-tolerance for employees in breach of these rules.

“These proposed changes should go some way towards making all drivers think about the consequences of their actions.”

The Government formerly planned four-point penalties, read more here

Emma Banks, head of corporate communications at UK insurance company Sheilas’ Wheels, said: “Despite the repeated warnings and campaigns on the matter, it seems that motorists continue to take the 'it’ll never happen to me' approach by using their mobile phones while behind the wheel.

“These individuals are not only endangering their own lives, but also those of any passengers, fellow motorists and pedestrians.”

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Comments
21

9 November 2016
losing their licence should be enforced now! But happy that its coming soon. What eeks me is a car on a motorway doing 60mph in the third lane blocking all traffic causing cars to undercut, then as you manage to overtake the mofo is talking on the phone. really pisses me off. i want to just ram my car into them (i wont, but i do really want to).
Red Devil

9 November 2016
More claptrap from the Govt attempting to hide the fact they aren't doing anything about junior doctors, the NHS, prisons, immigration, Brexit, Scotland, Syria etc.

It's the police that enforce this and they aren't able to do more than they are already.

9 November 2016
AHA1 wrote:

More claptrap from the Govt attempting to hide the fact they aren't doing anything about junior doctors, the NHS, prisons, immigration, Brexit, Scotland, Syria etc.

It's the police that enforce this and they aren't able to do more than they are already.

Nothing in the article suggests that the Police will need to or in fact will be expected to do any more than they already are, it merely outlines the fact that anyone prosecuted will now face more severe punishments. Which is a good thing you would have thought?? As for the rest of your rant I'll just point out that this is a site dedicated to motoring which is why the article is kind of relevant unlike anything else you mentioned.

9 November 2016
Shouldn't it be courses for dangerous drivers?

9 November 2016
i appologise to anyone who thinks i am defending phone use in a car, i am not. I am all in favour of these penalties. But every review we read of a car spends much of its time on conectivity, and the size of the all important touch screen, apple this, google that. Really its just turning the car into one big phone you sit in. I doubt many people can really see the difference between using the technology in your car as a phone or holding one to their ear.

9 November 2016
artill wrote:

i appologise to anyone who thinks i am defending phone use in a car, i am not. I am all in favour of these penalties. But every review we read of a car spends much of its time on conectivity, and the size of the all important touch screen, apple this, google that. Really its just turning the car into one big phone you sit in. I doubt many people can really see the difference between using the technology in your car as a phone or holding one to their ear.

I agree with what your saying but if your holding a phone to your ear you've only got one hand to control the car which obviously isn't ideal, the in-car systems I have personally used at least allow you receive calls whilst keeping both hands on or near to the wheel by having the relevant buttons close at hand and of course eliminate the need for any physical interaction with the phone itself. I still don't think talking whilst driving is necessarily the dangerous part though, it's the taking your eyes off the road to set up or receive the call in the first place that's a bigger problem. It's why texting whilst driving is a bigger problem in my opinion. Harder to spot though.

9 November 2016
Visiting the ROSPA website and reading the article "Mobile Phones and Driving - 2015" should provide independent, non-anecdotal evidence of the dangers of driving whilst using a mobile phone (hands-free or not) and particularly whilst texting. Perhaps an impartial investigation as to whether in car technology detrimentally affects safety should be conducted prior to it's further 'integration' into car design. Avoidance of a collision is surely preferable to surviving one.

9 November 2016
I've never looked at any official evidence so I'll have a peek at that with interest. What I would say is that if you have a very good system in your car and a compatible phone that allows you to make and receive calls without having to use your hands to do it or take your eyes off the road, as many systems do nowadays, it's less of a distraction than having a conversation with an actual person in the car itself.

1 March 2017
The evidence I heard is that a passenger will naturally stop talking to you when you get to tricky junctions and dangerous parts of the road. Someone on the phone cannot see this so distract you. Statistically you are less likely to crash if you have a passenger. My wife however talks incessantly no matter what the conditions are and she's a driver. I can choose to switch off though, something you can't do as easily while on the phone. If you see someone talking on the phone whilst driving, look at them, let them know you have clocked them. They need to be shamed into not doing it

10 November 2016
OK so
1. the Police Force is being depleted (nothing to do with Mrs Mays husband who runs G4S by the way)
2.They don't enforce it now so why will tougher penalties make any difference to the idiots who do it now as they get away with it, I see it on the M40 every Monday and Thursday in the commute
3.why the hell is it so important to answer the phone by picking it up and worse texting or even worse watching TV, believe me I have seen it
"Get a life Britain, Don't take one"

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