Recent figures, however, suggest it would take 14 years and £9.3bn to repair Britain’s roads properly

The UK Government has confirmed that it will provide councils access to £100 million to help fix Britain's pothole-ridden roads.

Announced by transport secretary Chris Grayling, the money adds to the existing £75m in government funding already offered to councils from the Pothole Action Fund, as well as £46m for highways authorities. The Government estimates that about seven million potholes will be filled with this money.

The new fund was confirmed the week after the publishing of a report that said around 12% of UK roads are in poor condition. Aside from the recent cold snap, long-term underinvestment and ineffective government funding methods were cited as key contributions to the declining surface standards.

RAC roads policy boss Nicholas Lye said the report, which was produced by the Asphalt Industry Alliance (AIA), shows that “short-term funding and creating pots by which local authorities can bid for cash doesn’t appear to be addressing the root cause of the problem”.

AIA figures show that 24,496 miles of roads are in need of repair in Britain over the next year. The total budget shortfall to repair pothole-filled roads currently totals an estimated £556m, equating to a shortfall of £3.3m for each authority.

Potholes: how much they cost the UK and how they are fixed

The Government has said it is investing £6 billion in improving local roads, but the AIA claims that inconsistencies in allocated budgets make it difficult for local authorities to initiate long-term fixes.

“All of the average totals hide a wide disparity that exists between those seeing increased funding and others who have seen their budgets cut and funds diverted to other areas of council expenditure, notably education and social care,” the report said.

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The report claimed that, even with effective funding, the issue is so vast that it “would now take 14 years to get local roads back into a reasonable steady state” – two years more than the previous AIA estimate – and cost £9.3bn.

The pothole in the Government's road repair plan

“As things stand, all road users are faced with the prospect of road surfaces falling into an even worse state, making for increasingly uncomfortable, expensive and, in some cases, downright dangerous journeys,” said Lye.

Bad road surfaces and potholes can accelerate wear on car suspension components or even cause direct damage. UK authorities paid out £7.3m in compensation to affected motorists in 2017, a rise of more than £500,000 on the year before.

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Comments
17

20 March 2018

There has been plenty of investment, just to contracted out services which on paper looked like cost save but actually has cost more due to the fact the don't resurface roads like they used to, they just plug up gaps henec why it has gradually gfot worse and worse.

When they plug a pothole they should cut a bigger chunk and resurface the whole surafce but they just do a sticking plaster over and over again.

20 March 2018
Pistachio wrote:

There has been plenty of investment, just to contracted out services which on paper looked like cost save but actually has cost more due to the fact the don't resurface roads like they used to, they just plug up gaps henec why it has gradually gfot worse and worse.

When they plug a pothole they should cut a bigger chunk and resurface the whole surafce but they just do a sticking plaster over and over again.

which tells you they don’t have the cash to do a proper Job, plus, there are penalties for not getting the Job done on time...!

Peter Cavellini.

20 March 2018

First we don't build new roads particularly well, I can think of plenty of dual carriageways built in the last 10-20 years suffering major subsidence and deteriorating surfaces. Then when issues arise we don't fix them properly and try to patch them up which just means the repairs fail sooner. If we did the jobs properly in the first place surely it would cost less in the long run. Yet despite the deteriorating condition of our roads that we all moan about, people still insist on oversized alloys and low profile tyres which simply aren't practical. You can get a new BMW X2 on 20s! A matter of personal choice? Well maybe, except when those very expensive wheels are damaged on a pothole, the compensation will be paid by the Council which then reduces the amount of money they have to repair the potholes...

20 March 2018

 BREXIT, heard of it?, Council up and down the Country are being forced to cut there spending in every  department, small Councils are hit the worst because they have a small budget as it is, I travel through three Council areas on a weekly basis and the Roads vary from bad to diabolical!, you virtually have to drive like you were drunk!, you have to weave in and around some pretty deep potholes!, so, it’s not all the Councils fault, it’s central Government wanting budget savings, and, the cuts aren’t proportional, it’s a flat rate, so little Councils are paying the more than a larger Council.

Peter Cavellini.

20 March 2018

People vote for cuts then wonder why the roads are falling apart.


20 March 2018
The problem in this country isn't a lack of money - it's that moronic (so called) civil sevants in national & local government, choose to spend public money on the wrong things.

There's never a shortage of funding for hair brained schemes, that achieve nothing more than to justify the existence of individuals & commitees, whilst the country goes to hell in a hand cart.

There've been all sorts of fancy (pointless) projects near where we live, whilst all the time public services get cut, the elderley & infirm suffer and tax-payers watch as their ££'s are misappropriated. Now the local road infrastucture is far less suitable for the volume of traffic travelling from newly developed housing estates (leading to gridlock/emissions & wasted hours) and pot-holes are refilled so poorly that the repair teams are repeatedly paid for the same work, as they return week in and week out to the same holes.

There's never any accountability or consequences either: If a private company were operated in the same mis-managed manner, it would be out of business in no time.

20 March 2018
MarkII wrote:

The problem in this country isn't a lack of money - it's that moronic (so called) civil sevants in national & local government, choose to spend public money on the wrong things. There's never a shortage of funding for hair brained schemes, that achieve nothing more than to justify the existence of individuals & commitees, whilst the country goes to hell in a hand cart. There've been all sorts of fancy (pointless) projects near where we live, whilst all the time public services get cut, the elderley & infirm suffer and tax-payers watch as their ££'s are misappropriated. Now the local road infrastucture is far less suitable for the volume of traffic travelling from newly developed housing estates (leading to gridlock/emissions & wasted hours) and pot-holes are refilled so poorly that the repair teams are repeatedly paid for the same work, as they return week in and week out to the same holes. There's never any accountability or consequences either: If a private company were operated in the same mis-managed manner, it would be out of business in no time.

The services you mentioned are done by private business and have been done for years, it is the British disease, when the highways are being repaired by private business the staff are poorly managed and you will seeing them standing idle until their task comes round, British management could n't arrange a piss up in a brewery and they don't care as long as their pensions are safe. If people see someone getting something for doing nothing, they think why should n't I?

Just look at the top in the UK and work your way down. 

20 March 2018
Thank you 230SL: I'm well aware that those charged with carrying out the repairs to our roads are private companies contracted by local government but let's face it, private companies are in business to make money (so you can't blame them for trying to do that wherever they can) however the effective use of public funds is the Council's responsibility and it's for them to ensure that repairs are proportionate, of suitable quality and cost effective.

If local councils can't effectively manage their contractors, control expenditure and justify the value of work carried out, then they can't keep asking central government or the tax payer for more money and yet that's exactly what they have been doing on this issue and a thousand others for years.

What we need is national and local government with joined up thinking: well conceived plans that deliver the transport infrastructure that this country needs, effective control/monitoring of every pound spent and a quantifiable return on investment but until pigs start flying I fear the holes in our roads will continue to resemble public budgets ie bottomless pits.

20 March 2018

"but let's face it, private companies are in business to make money (so you can't blame them for trying to do that wherever they can)"

No sorry, i can. Other countries manage it..it's this attitude that to make money we have to mug off the customer and give them crappy service that has made this nation the place it is today. It is possible to do a thorough, quality job, and also to make money. Ask the Germans, the Japanese etc. 

21 March 2018
michael knight wrote:

"but let's face it, private companies are in business to make money (so you can't blame them for trying to do that wherever they can)"

No sorry, i can. Other countries manage it..it's this attitude that to make money we have to mug off the customer and give them crappy service that has made this nation the place it is today. It is possible to do a thorough, quality job, and also to make money. Ask the Germans, the Japanese etc. 

When the West realise that profit doesn't have to be milked from absolutely everything, then we may see improvements.

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