Test programme halted following first known death caused by self-driving vehicle

Uber has shut down its autonomous vehicle testing programme in the US state of Arizona two months after one of its cars was involved in an accident that killed a pedestrian.

Following Arizona governor Doug Ducey's decision to suspend Uber's testing rights in the state, the company has now officially halted the programme. No timeframe has been set for when testing will resume; for now, Uber's focus will be on smaller programmes in Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania and California.

Uber has come under fire as the operator of the first autonomous vehicle to have been involved in a fatal incident. In a previous letter addressed to Uber CEO Dara Khosrowshahi, Ducey called a video of the incident, in which a self-driving car crashed into a 49-year-old woman, "disturbing and alarming" and that it "raises many questions about the ability to continue testing in Arizona".

"As governor, my top priority is public safety," Ducey wrote. "In the best interests of the people of my state, I have directed the Arizona Department of Transportation to suspend Uber's ability to test and operate autonomous vehicles on Arizona's public roadways."

Police in the city of Tempe said that the car involved, a modified Volvo XC90, was driving itself with an operator behind the wheel when it struck a woman crossing the road with a bicycle. The woman later died from her injuries in hospital.

"A female walking outside of the crosswalk crossed the road from west to east when she was struck by the Uber vehicle," Tempe police said in a statement.

Uber said after the incident that it was "fully co-operating" with the police investigation and has expressed condolences to the victim's family. Tempe police continue to investigate the incident, along with the National Transportation Safety Board and National Highway Traffic Safety Administration.

Khosrowshahi said via his Twitter account: "We’re thinking of the victim’s family as we work with local law enforcement to understand what happened.”

Uber began self-driving testing in Tempe in February 2017, when it switched operations from California following a dispute with officials in that state. A few months after testing began, an Uber car was involved in an accident with another vehicle, which failed to stop at a junction. Nobody was hurt in that incident.

Tempe mayor Mark Mitchell said: "The city of Tempe has been supportive of autonomous vehicle testing because of the innovation and promise the technology may offer in many areas, including transportation options for disabled residents and seniors. Testing must occur safely. All indications we have had in the past show that traffic laws are being obeyed by the companies testing here."

Although there have been crashes involving self-driving vehicles, including a well-documented one involving a Google autonomous car in 2016, Uber's 2018 incident is thought to be the first to have resulted in a fatality.

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Comments
40

19 March 2018

Not

Going

To

Happen

Steam cars are due a revival.

19 March 2018
Thekrankis wrote:

Not

Going

To

Happen

I'm not sure that an incedent like this is a good reason to stop dvelopment altogether but, whilst we are, as a species, fairly tolerant of the fact that we make mistakes and have accidents. We are not so tolerant of our machines causing injury or death, no matter what the actual reason for the accident may be, especially when that machine is far too complex for most to understand how it works. The Luddites are still among us and they are many.

Citroëniste.

GBM

27 March 2018
Succinctly put. I don't think many people tolerate the idea of innocent people dying at the hands of a company looking to profit from this technology. Ive got no idea how it's even being allowed on public roads at this stage of its development.

19 March 2018

It will be interesting to hear what the explanation for this sad incident is. A pedestrian crossing in front of a vehicle would seem to be a fairly basic, simple situation, you'd have thought the vehicle would have easily coped.

19 March 2018

More information is needed.

it would be possible to put both a driven and autonomous vehicle alike in a position where a collision is unavoidable

19 March 2018

There will always be risk when pedestrians and vehicles share the same space and without knowing the circumstances it's  impossible to know who or what was to blame. But I'm sure that autonomous cars have the potential to avoid these kind of accidents rather better than us fallible human beings.

19 March 2018

What was the person doing that was behind the wheel? Surely they are there to monitor and intervene when needed?

19 March 2018
fatboyfat wrote:

What was the person doing that was behind the wheel? Surely they are there to monitor and intervene when needed?

Exactly my thought, May the woman acted like a typical cyclist and jumped in front of a moving car. 

If you don't look back at your car after you parked it, you own the wrong car.

19 March 2018
wheels wrote:

Exactly my thought, May the woman acted like a typical cyclist and jumped in front of a moving car. 

[/quote]

 

People don’t “jump in front of a moving car”; they don’t “suddenly appear out of your blind spot”; and they don’t “pop out of nowhere”.

They are using the road as appropriate and you’ve failed to take in the situation and adequately observe other road users.

19 March 2018

So.  Uber has just killed someone.

 

There will be loads of similar incidents, and the relentless failing will be that autonomous cars can't take or make or perceive moral decisions.  

 

Hit one child or two adults?

 

Hit a dog or someone sitting down?

 

And who is responsible for the impact if the car is fully autonomous?  It has to be the manufacturer, which is surely totally unreconcilable?

 

I can't think of a more unpleasant and stressful driving situation than being a passenger at the wheel of an autonomous car.  The situations where you might have to take the wheel occur in fractions of a second - far too quickly for you to be doing anything else.  Starting such a situation with your hands otherwise engaged would be disasterous, so what are you supposed to do with yourself?

 

Manufacturers are stumbling willfully into a minefield.

 

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