Subsidiary will help increase vehicle to grid integration with electric models

Renault has launched a new subsidiary brand called Renault Energy Services that will focus on smart-grid technology.

The firm, which is described as being “like a start-up” will invest in projects that boost the uptake of smart vehicle charging for electric cars, harnessing their ability to contribute to the electricity grid.

Like its alliance sibling Nissan, Renault intends for its new company to enable cars to charge when electricity supply exceeds demand, and also then feed power back into the grid when demand is at its peak.

Additionally, Renault Energy Services will invest in the use of electric car batteries that are no longer useful to power a car. These used batteries can be used for stationary energy storage, powering everything from homes to businesses.

Gilles Normand, senior vice president of Renault’s electric vehicle division, said: “The creation of Renault Energy Services marks an important step forward. Investing in smart grids is key to both reinforcing the lead we enjoy in the European electric vehicle market and accelerating the EV industry’s scale-up.”

Renault's push for electric has also been bolstered with the newly revealed Drive the Future plan of the Renault-Nissan-Mitsubishi Alliance. The plan includes the launching of eight fully electric and 12 electrified models by 2022.

Nissan recently announced plans for its own bi-directional charging scheme, which it claims could make running EVs like its new Leaf completely free. This would be possible thanks to the ‘selling’ of energy back to the grid, with the potential for this to equal the cost of charging.

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9 October 2017

Like its alliance sibling Nissan, Renault intends for its new company to enable cars to charge when electricity supply exceeds demand, and also then feed power back into the grid when demand is at its peak.

 

What happens if you need to go out just after peak demand time, your car will be empty & useless.  Even if it is manually controllable, this will make non pre planned trips a gamble.

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