Currently reading: Mini range to be cut back to five models
BMW officials confirm that the third generation of Mini's model range will be smaller, with five 'super hero' vehicles leading the line-up
News
2 mins read
27 November 2014

Mini’s third generation of cars will be pared back to just five models, according to the Peter Schwarzenbauer, the BMW board member responsible for the British brand.

Speaking yesterday in Munich, Schwarzenbauer said the new five-door Mini Clubman would be launched in 2015 and would be the third of “five super hero” models for the brand, the first two being the three-door and five-door hatchbacks. The fourth model will be a replacement for the Countryman

BMW sources were less forthcoming about the fifth model, but it is expected to be a convertible, which could incorporate much of the design language of the recent Mini Superleggera roadster concept.

Plug-in hybrid versions of the Mini could also arrive over the next five years, Schwarzenbauer said.

Meanwhile, Schwarzenbauer revealed that October and November saw double-digit growth for Mini as the third-generation three-door hatchback and new five-door model came on stream. 

He predicted that the last three months of 2014 would be the “best ever” for Mini sales. In 2013 Mini sold 305,000 cars globally.

The decision to restrict Mini to five main models was part of a board-level decision to send Mini in a new direction for the future, he said. “This is work in progress, but we are continually questioning Mini’s future. We will adjust the brand quite a lot over several years. The heritage will still be important, but we also have to be shaped by the zeitgeist.”

Schwarzenbauer hinted that access to Mini and its dealers would shift to a “24/7” basis. “We believe society is going through another significant change, just as it did at the millennium," he said. "The next 10 years of the auto industry will see more change than the last 100 years.

“People are demanding more information about the way a product is made and how it is sourced. People are looking for a more sustainable lifestyle and we are now seeing the growth of a ‘sharing’ economy.”

Schwarzenbauer also said Mini buyers were increasingly opting for more powerful and more highly specified vehicles. Sales of the Cooper S models have grown from 25 per cent of overall sales to 34 per cent and JCW models now account for five per cent of sales.

Get the latest car news, reviews and galleries from Autocar direct to your inbox every week. Enter your email address below:

Advertisement
Advertisement

Find an Autocar review

Read our review

Car review

Now in its third generation, we find out if the bigger, cleverer and more mature Mini can still entertain like it predecessors did

Join the debate

Comments
17
Add a comment…
Myk 27 November 2014

Er

Have I understood this correctly? They're dropping the Convertible (4 seats, sells well) and the Roadster (2 seats, can't give them away) and replacing them both with a different 2 seater? Can anyone else see the inherent flaw? Believe me, I think we need more little sports cars, but dropping the Convertible seems like madness considering how popular they are. I actually saw a Paceman in traffic the other day and thought it looked quite attractive (not from the front). It's ok, I went for a lie down afterwards.
catnip 27 November 2014

Myk wrote:Have I understood

Myk wrote:

Have I understood this correctly? They're dropping the Convertible (4 seats, sells well) and the Roadster (2 seats, can't give them away) and replacing them both with a different 2 seater? Can anyone else see the inherent flaw? Believe me, I think we need more little sports cars, but dropping the Convertible seems like madness considering how popular they are.

The comments and numbers in the article don't really add up. The new convertible has already been seen testing and, as you say, sells far too well for them to drop. I would say the 3 and 5 door versions of the hatch are one model, the convertible the second, the new Clubman the the third, then the next Countryman and version of the Superleggera to be fourth and fifth. Of course thats just my logic.

MG Writer 27 November 2014

These statements don't exactly support each other...

"People are looking for a more sustainable lifestyle and we are now seeing the growth of a ‘sharing’ economy.”.....................

......................."Schwarzenbauer also said Mini buyers were increasingly opting for more powerful and more highly specified vehicles"

Just shows that corporate PR speak is often just so much space-wasting bunkum.

Hilton Holloway 27 November 2014

Quite right

It's a good point, but shows just where global middle class consumerism is heading.
MG Writer 27 November 2014

Hilton Holloway wrote:It's a

Hilton Holloway wrote:

It's a good point, but shows just where global middle class consumerism is heading.

To Hell in a Hand Cart?

MG Writer 27 November 2014

Yes - they do talk twaddle...

I can only assume that the translator had been ingesting psychotropic drugs.

Shame about dropping the Roadster as it actually drives really well, looks and handles better than the heavier and structurally floppier pram-hooded convertible, doesn't pretend you can squeeze humans with legs of any kind behind the two main seats and actually has a very decent sized boot which is unimpeded by the folded hood.

Find an Autocar car review