Korean car makers will use London firm's skateboard platform for a new line of electric commercial vehicles
Felix Page Autocar writer
16 January 2020

Kia and Hyundai have invested €100 million (£85.4 million) in London-based electric vehicle (EV) manufacturer Arrival, making it one of the UK’s most valuable start-ups. 

Through the new partnership, the Korean car makers plan to “introduce competitively priced small and medium-sized electric vans and other products for logistics and on-demand ride-hailing and shuttle service companies” using Arrival’s scalable EV platform.

Arrival says its skateboard-style platform can be used for a range of bespoke new EVs across different categories. Its suitability for commercial vehicle applications will allow Hyundai and Kia to expand their EV range beyond passenger cars such as the e-Niro and Kona Electric. It will also reduce the average CO2 output of the manufacturers’ fleets ahead of tightening European emissions regulation in 2021.

Arrival was founded in 2015 but hasn't widely publicised its actions. It has 800 employees working in a series of innovative, small-footprint ‘microfactories’ in five countries that build vehicles to order to serve communities in the surrounding areas. 

The company’s Gen2.0-EV is an electric van aimed at companies in urban areas. Technical details remain unconfirmed, but it's claimed to have a range of 300 miles and a payload of 4250kg. It's expected to be priced from £35,000 when it enters production in 2021. 

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Arrival CEO Denis Sverdlov said: “We're excited to come out of stealth mode with our partnership with Hyundai and Kia, a globally respected OEM [original equipment manufacturer] with brilliant products on the road, and our complementary expertise will allow us to rapidly transition to full-scale global production. 

“Accelerating electric vehicle adoption is good for everyone - for people, business and the planet – and we're pleased to undertake this mission with our partners Hyundai and Kia.”

Earlier this week, Kia announced development of a bespoke new EV arriving in 2021 as part of a £19 billion electric mobility development programme. Also detailed was a plan to branch out into commercial EVs with investment in global start-ups. 

In 2019, the firms invested £60 million in Croatian hypercar firm Rimac as part of a technical partnership that will involve them developing two high-performance EVs by the end of this year.

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Hyundai and Rimac team up to develop electric performance cars​

Kia to launch new EV in 2021 as part of £19bn strategy​

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Comments
13

16 January 2020

Wouldn't it be nice if delivery Vans got a make over.?, especially if they looked like this.

16 January 2020

Just over a month since the elections and the word 'Brexit' seems to left the table ( thank goodness ). So in the interests of nostalga, can I ask those who were against Brexit, how does this news square with the apparent lack of investment in UK firms that was supposed to happen?

 

16 January 2020
Given Hyundai/Kia are not based in the EU and provide vehicles on a global basis, whilst brexit is likely to have been a consideration, it is unlikely to have been a major issue. Clearly they liked the product and having evaluated all the commercial risks, decided to invest. The simple fact is no one knows how brexit will pan out - it is no use suggesting that a deal like this shows brexit will work out fine, just the same as there is no point assuming it will be a disaster.

16 January 2020
Will86 wrote:

Given Hyudai/Kia are not based in the UK... ...it is no use suggesting that a deal like this shows brexit will work out fine, just the same as there is no point assuming it will be a disaster.

I'm not suggesting anything, just making the point that for three years leading up to the election, there were a section of people who said over and over again, that people wouldn't invest in the UK - that's all. I don't recall there being any caveat's placed, it was all doom and gloom.

We still don't know what form Brexit will take, (uncertainty?) but irrespective of that, the point is two big players have just invested in the UK. That wasn't supposed to happen.

16 January 2020
scotty5 wrote:

Just over a month since the elections and the word 'Brexit' seems to left the table ( thank goodness ). So in the interests of nostalga, can I ask those who were against Brexit, how does this news square with the apparent lack of investment in UK firms that was supposed to happen?

 

The Tories haven’t said recently how or where they are going to plug up the holes going to be left when European business leaves Britain,and who are going to be our future markets?

16 January 2020
So Peter, which European firms are leaving the UK?!?

19 January 2020
scotty5 wrote:

Just over a month since the elections and the word 'Brexit' seems to left the table ( thank goodness ). So in the interests of nostalga, can I ask those who were against Brexit, how does this news square with the apparent lack of investment in UK firms that was supposed to happen?

 

its peanuts in investment vehicle terms plus the company is in 5 countries and it doesn't actually say where the investment will be used apart from this Russian's startup in general

16 January 2020

This is very nice

16 January 2020

I fully agree, Royal Mail vans need a makeover

On the outside that is

16 January 2020

Surely Boris should have encouraged Elon Musk to locate his Megafactory in the up-coming vacant Honda factory in Swindon. He could have billed it as "oven-ready" rather than Tesla having to put up with the lengthy time its gonna take him in Berlin to do it.......(They started on a new Airport in 2006 & its still not finished)

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