Currently reading: German government attacks Fiat Chrysler for emissions stance
Reports suggest Fiat Chrysler cars could be taken off sale in Germany as row over possible emissions test device deepens
Jim Holder
News
1 min read
23 May 2016

Fiat Chrysler could be banned from selling cars in Germany after refusing to attend a government hearing on its use of emissions control devices, according to reports.

Last month, German transport minister Alexander Dobrindt summoned Fiat to a hearing to explain why a Fiat 500X was found to be running an emissions control device that shut off after 22 minutes - two minutes after the official test cycle that determines official pollution levels is completed.

The emissions tests were undertaken by Germany’s transport authority, the KBA, on behalf of the German Government, and the findings have been reported to the European Commission and Italian authorities. It is understood that tests are now being carried out on other Fiat vehicles.

Fiat has responded by saying that its emissions control systems fully comply with European law, and declined to attend the meeting with Dobrindt citing the grounds that its testing was run under Italian jurisdiction.

Dobrindt, in turn, criticised Fiat's "uncooperative attitude", saying its stance was "totally incomprehensible".

Italy’s Transport Minister, Graziano Delrio, reacted by saying that German authorities should contact Italian car regulators and not the company directly. He added that he had assurances that Fiat Chrysler would fully co-operate with any investigations if conducted correctly.

Consequently media reports in Germany and by the BBC have suggested Germany could respond by suspending sales of Fiat Chrysler vehicles while the discussions are ongoing.

 

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Ralf S. 24 May 2016

On the other hand..

Fiat says its devices are legal.

If the test runs for 20 minutes and the law says the vehicle "must pass the test..." what happens in the 21st minute is rather academic.

Germans could end up with a VERY big legal and compensation claim if Fiat think they've lost sales as a result.

VAG on the other hand... are not going to sell many cars in Italy if the German government (aka. VW's bitch) try to shaft Fiat. It's going from bad to worse for Krautland... :D

Ralf S.

torovich 24 May 2016

Just another loophole

Maybe the emissions starts to damage the engine after 22 minutes running. After all other manufacturers seem to be getting off with turning off emissions when it's a bit chilly, and they are using a legal loophole! Of course, the EU commission may well be implicated in the whole drive for diesel and the lax legislation. It wouldn't be helpfull for their part to be exposed while the UK is considering Brexit, and the TTIP negotiations are going on. Also why is no one getting upset that the proposed software updates may damage reliability (DPF &EGR) when the whole reason for exploting the loophole was to protect these items? Also why is the VW defeat device illegal and other manufacturers device legal? I don't think a court has ruled on anything. All vehicles seen to emit similar omissions on the road and VW aren't the worse. Maybe the EU has already decided. It all looks very suspicious.
torovich 24 May 2016

Just another loophole

Maybe the emissions starts to damage the engine after 22 minutes running. After all other manufacturers seem to be getting off with turning off emissions when it's a bit chilly, and they are using a legal loophole!

Of course, the EU commission may well be implicated in the whole drive for diesel and the lax legislation. It wouldn't be helpfull for their part to be exposed while the UK is considering Brexit, and the TTIP negotiations are going on. Also why is no one getting upset that the proposed software updates may damage reliability (DPF &EGR) when the whole reason for exploting the loophole was to protect these items? Also why is the VW defeat device illegal and other manufacturers device legal? I don't think a court has ruled on anything. All vehicles seen to emit similar omissions on the road and VW aren't the worse. Maybe the EU has already decided. It all looks very suspicious.