Next generation powertrains, such as Ford’s 1.0-litre three-cylinder Ecoboost engine will reduce fuel consumption by 30 per cent compared to today’s units
12 June 2012

Ford Focus-sized family hatchbacks returning 97.5mpg will be commonplace within three years, predicts Bosch board member Peter Tyroller – fuel economy 40 per cent better than today’s cars. 

This will be achieved through a combination of powertrain improvements and other measures such as low rolling resistance tyres and engine stop-start – but unlike today, such ‘other measures’ will be a far smaller part of the improvements. 

Petrol will not be left behind either: Tyroller, speaking at the SMMT International Automotive Summit at Canary Wharf, predicts a family-sized car averaging 64.2mpg on the official cycle will become common.

Next generation powertrains, such as Ford’s 1.0-litre three-cylinder Ecoboost engine (which has replaced the older 1.6-litre four-cylinder and now accounts for one in four UK Focus sales), will reduce fuel consumption by 30 per cent compared to today’s engines. Add-on measures will reduce it by a further 10 per cent, predicts Tyroller. 

Up to now, it is the widespread adoption of technology such as stop-start and longer gear ratios to existing powertrains that have led fuel economy improvements. Many argue these are more effective for reducing official fuel consumption figures than actual real-world economy.

Manufacturers are making such investment in internal combustion engines because the technology will remain by far the biggest powertrain solution. Even by 2020, Tyroller predicts electrified vehicles – including plug-in hybrids as well as pure electric cars – will only account for 10 per cent of the European new car market. 

Diesel in particular is vital to European legislation of achieving a 95g/km corporate fleet average CO2 figure by 2020. “Diesel is key in Europe: OEMs will achieve the 95g/km target with a small share of EV sales.” Only after 2020 will EVs start to become more important. 

When asked about sales splits beyond 2025, Tyroller replied: “who knows?”

The importance of EVs in achieving CO2 targets has already declined from expectations a few years ago, added Tyroller. “Two years ago, people said our 10 per cent target was too conservative. Now, they agree” – largely because of the Europe-wide recession that has tipped the cost benefit back towards internal combustion engines. 

Richard Aucock

 

 

 

 

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15

12 June 2012

Interesting stuff and I'm curious to know what technological improvements can be made to the internal combustion engine that can give such big increases that don't already exist now, rather than three years time.

12 June 2012

Injection can still be a lot optimized, this can lead to increases in costs of the injection systems but there is still room for improvements in combustion engines for the next 20 years and beyond.

12 June 2012

Dont think it will be just the powertrain to be improved aluminium bodyshells are sure to become more common as are advanced plastics and lighter cars but just as strong as now .

12 June 2012

If these values can acheived in terms of economy, that implies that diesel and petrol engines are becoming more efficient.

Given that the bulk of Nuclear Power stations and Coal fired Power stations are 30-35% efficient, and the most modern deisgn of power stations are approaching 40% efficient, does this make ICE more "efficient" than electric cars?

I have been led to believe that electric motors are nearly 100% efficient, but power stations are not but they are still ultimately a distant part of an electric vehicles powertrain, making a nonsense out of the ZEV acronym and also any Equivalent MPG values published by manufacturers.

Does anyone see a falt in my logic here - possibly the term efficient which may make me look a proper idiot!

12 June 2012

topsecret456987 wrote:

If these values can acheived in terms of economy, that implies that diesel and petrol engines are becoming more efficient.

Given that the bulk of Nuclear Power stations and Coal fired Power stations are 30-35% efficient, and the most modern deisgn of power stations are approaching 40% efficient, does this make ICE more "efficient" than electric cars?

Don't forget that while petrol engines are about 35% efficient you have to transport the raw oil, refine the oil, then transport it again to the petrol station all of which makes the petrol engine less efficent than the  original 35%.  

Not sure how efficient a wind turbine machine is but there seem to be more  every day

 

Hydrogen cars just went POP

12 June 2012

topsecret456987 wrote:

If these values can acheived in terms of economy, that implies that diesel and petrol engines are becoming more efficient.

Given that the bulk of Nuclear Power stations and Coal fired Power stations are 30-35% efficient, and the most modern deisgn of power stations are approaching 40% efficient, does this make ICE more "efficient" than electric cars?

I have been led to believe that electric motors are nearly 100% efficient, but power stations are not but they are still ultimately a distant part of an electric vehicles powertrain, making a nonsense out of the ZEV acronym and also any Equivalent MPG values published by manufacturers.

Does anyone see a falt in my logic here - possibly the term efficient which may make me look a proper idiot!

Hmm, when was the last time you took the manufacturer quoted MPG numbers and managed to mirror them in real life driving, especially with the turbo-charged petrol powered cars?

I dont think you'd ever realistically appoach these figures. The standard ICE powered car is just not going to get much more efficient than it is, we're talking minimal increments from here on.

What we will see is better implementations of hybrid technologies. Which at their simplest are things like regenerative braking, cylinder deactivation and stop/start technology.

In my opinion however the best approach is the serial hybrid approach (kind of like the VOLT) the ICE shouldnt be directly connected to the wheels only used to maintain or recharge the battery.

In effect I envisage an electric car with small batteries, only enough for ~20 miles, but with backup generators designed to be as efficient as possible given their role as generators rather than prime movers... (i.e. most efficient in at a fixed rpm etc...) 

12 June 2012

We could slash CO2 emmisions in Europe by ecouraging firms to embrace more home working. How many office workers NEED to be in the office 5 days per week ? With modern network connections and video conferencing we perhaps have one or two days per week being home office based. Not only would that cut CO2 for those that commute by car but it would save money as well. Oh, and reduce congestion on our busy commuter routes and reduce overcrowding on trains for those that use them to travel to work.

So, uncongested roads and a seat on the train. What's not to like ?

Combine that with new very efficient engines and we may just avoid the 400ppm CO2 level that will trigger irriversable climate change. Oh, we reached that last week. Damn.

Oh, but wait a minute - that would reuced demand for fuel, and hence reduce oil comany revenues.  Nah, forget it - it'l never happen......

Get your Ambre Solaire/wellies ready instead.

 

 

12 June 2012

I think between you I have got it.

Efficiency in this context  means how much energy is extracted from the fuel.

Given the small differences in the efficiency of power stations and ICE, I doubt there will ever be much difference in terms of efficiency.

The big advantage of electric in the long term is cleaning up sources of pollution. This includes Sulphur/nitrogen oxides, mercury and carbon dioxide as just some of the polutants involved.

Even if it were possible to make ICE 100% efficient, stuck in a traffic jam with engine on = 0mpg. MPG is no measure of efficiency as defined above.

Just a note on homeworking - how efficient is your home - more houses heated in winter with heat escaping from poorly insulated homes is just as bad as sitting a car tbh. There are no easy answers.

Again - thanks for making me think this one through and back to big shiny motor cars which is what this site should be about. Apologies for hijacking this moment.

 

 

12 June 2012

Go and read the latest WHO report-diesels (Thank God, at last and about bl**dy time) are dead!

HOORAH!!!

13 June 2012

Lightningduck wrote:

Go and read the latest WHO report-diesels (Thank God, at last and about bl**dy time) are dead!

HOORAH!!!

I couldn't agree more. Well said.

 

Hydrogen cars just went POP

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