In the mag this week (dated 26 October) there’s a group test of the new Ginetta G60, in which we compare Britain’s excellent new sports car superstar with its rivals – namely the Lotus Evora S, Audi R8, Porsche Cayman and Nissan GT-R.

The Ginetta acquits itself exceedingly well, but in the end it can’t quite compete with the extraordinary all-round ability of the mighty GT-R. The test proved many things, for all sorts of reasons, but most of all it reiterated how much value there is to the GT-R recipe.

             Ginetta takes on Nissan, Lotus and Audi

No matter which way look at it, and no matter what sort of cars you compare it with at roughly the same price (it costs £71,950) the Nissan is just an incredible hunk of car for the money, plain and simple.

And the scary thing is, it’s about to get even better still. On 7 November Nissan will officially introduce a new 2012 model year version that boasts more power, more performance, even tastier handling and, as is de rigeur nowadays, better economy and cleaner emissions, too.

At the moment Nissan won’t actually say precisely how much power the new GT-R generates, but what I can tell you – having driven it yesterday with a 2011 example, back-to-back – is that it certainly feels a fair bit quicker, especially at the top end.

Which is kind of ridiculous, really, given that the 2011 car was already capable of flooring all comers, on all surfaces. At a guess I’d say the new GT-R has 560, maybe 565bhp (the current one has 525) but the big difference I noticed was in the extra agility of its chassis. Nissan has retuned the GT-R’s suspension, its all-wheel-drive system and the brakes to be even more responsive, and on a circuit (I drove it at Silverstone) the new car feels a fair bit sharper everywhere.

It’s also 6kg lighter, with the spring rates altered across the car to be 50kg stiffer on the driver’s side, depending whether it’s left or right hand drive. That’s a first as far as I’m aware, and it’s typical of the attention to detail contained throughout this most amazing of cars.

Conclusion: the best just got quite a lot better still – and the gap between it and the rest of the universe just got wider as a result.