As is the case with all plug-in hybrids, long-term fuel economy is going to entirely depend on your typical trip characteristics. That the Superb iV returns around 40mpg purely under the locomotion of its downsized petrol engine suggests that high-mileage drivers are still better off buying a diesel model.

However, if you drive shorter distances and have the ability to charge at home – and possibly also at work – you might manage half your weekly mileage on battery power alone, at which point you could expect an average economy of 75mpg.

Skoda holds its value well against its rivals. The BMW 330e outperforms the Superb iV by the narrowest of margins.

Company car drivers also stand to benefit from the Skoda’s low benefit-in-kind payments, particularly after April, when changes to the way this tax is calculated will result in higher rates for non-hybrid cars and the iV will become the cheapest car to run in the range.

That the list price also undercuts not only the Passat GTE but both the Peugeot 508 Hybrid and, by an impressive margin, BMW’s smaller 330e means private buyers benefit, too. The money saved could be put to use elsewhere or spent upgrading to L&K trim, which equips the Superb iV with almost every option it is possible to have and yet still brings the balance to less than £39,000.

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