From £26,0658
The all-wheel-drive version of the Jaguar XE gets a new range-topping 236bhp Ingenium diesel engine in a bid to take on the powerful oil-burners from the likes of Audi, BMW and Mercedes-Benz

Our Verdict

Jaguar XE

Jaguar's first attempt at a compact exec saloon is good - very good. But can the XE hold off the BMW 3 Series and Alfa Romeo Guilia to retain its crown?

  • First Drive

    Jaguar XE 2.0d 240 2017 review

    The all-wheel-drive version of the Jaguar XE gets a new range-topping 236bhp Ingenium diesel engine in a bid to take on the powerful oil-burners from the likes
  • First Drive

    Jaguar XE S 2017 review

    Updated range-topping Jaguar XE gets more power to enhance the appeal of one of the best sub-£55k performance saloons around
James Attwood, digital editor
11 August 2017

What is it?

Jaguar Land Rover’s new range of Ingenium diesel engines, first seen on the Range Rover Evoque and Land Rover Dscovery Sport, have now made their way into the other half of the business.

The range-topping unit is a 236bhp four-cylinder twin-turbo, which has been fitted to the all-wheel-drive version of the class-leading XE saloon. That AWD version was introduced last year as Jaguar’s next step to expand into markets dominated by the likes of Audi, BMW and Mercedes-Benz

As before, the drive system is rear-biased, diverting power to the front wheels when needed. And, as before, there’s a cost to the AWD system: weight. In fact, adding in the twin-turbo and extra bits of the engine means this version of the XE weighs 1650kg; an increase of 35kg over the 178bhp diesel that previously topped the range. But this is offset by that extra 58bhp, which increases the top speed from 140mph to 155mph and, at 6.1sec, is 1.8sec quicker to reach 62mph.

What's it like?

Even with the AWD system and a new engine, on the whole this XE retains the familiar feel of the car, which is a very good thing. It’s effortless, pleasing and rewarding to drive; the class-leading dynamics of the car continue to shine through.

On our test drive, held in largely dry conditions, it was hard to feel the influence of the AWD system that often, but then it was rarely needed.

The twin turbocharged diesel has been designed by JLR to offer high power and torque, the two turbos working in sequence to smooth out the acceleration.

That said, at slow speed, the engine feels a little hesitant and languid. But when the power does arrive, it’s generally smooth, untroubled and refined. The eight-speed automatic gearbox complements it well and is generally as smooth as the powertrain.

Once you reach an A-road or a motorway, the Ingenium engine comes into its own. It cruises happily at speed and rarely feels strained. If you really ask for it, there’s a decent kick of power, although it’s not the sort of engine that ever thrusts us firmly further back into the comfortable embrace of our Portfolio trim test car’s brogue leather seats. 

Instead, the engine matches the XE’s handling dynamics: it’s pleasing; relaxing, even. The engine is also perfectly suited for cruising on long journeys. It’s capable of effortlessly eating up mileage while remaining engaging enough to always offer an enjoyable drive – and capable of delivering a more engaging one if you seek it out. With an official combined mpg of 54.4, this is also a car that remains a relatively economical choice for regular long journey usage.

That refined, comfortable feel was evident in our test car’s Portfolio trim, which comes with the latest version of Jaguar’s InControl infotainment system, digital dashboard and head-up display, along with a range of driver aids and safety systems. If the interior isn’t necessarily class-leading, it’s certainly up there in the mix.

Should I buy one?

The extra power and performance of the new engine ensures the XE remains a compelling choice for anyone seeking an AWD saloon or an economical and rewarding long-distance diesel cruiser. It’s competitively priced and blends comfort with performance.

Jaguar XE 2.0D 240 AWD

On sale now; Price £38,375; Location Middlesex; On sale Now; Price £38,375 Engine 4 cyls, 1999cc, diesel; Power 236bhp at 4000rpm Torque 500lb ft at 1500rpm; Gearbox 8-spd automatic; Kerb weight 1650kg; 0-62mph 6.1sec; Top speed 155mph; Economy 54.4mpg (combined); CO2/tax band 137g/km, 29%; Rivals BMW 320d xDrive, Audi A4 3.0 TDI quattro

Join the debate

Comments
20

11 August 2017

Jaguar is on the rise, with innovative engines and technology.   And style too.

 

BMW are on the wane with unreliable engines.   Leaving owners with bills running in to the thousands, sometimes even more than the car is worth.

 

And Audi are hoping you don't relise they're the same as VW, Seat, Skoda, and probably also have the same cheat software somewhere!

 

Mercedes?   Busy dominating F1 for the last few years!

11 August 2017
Autocar wrote:

....If the interior isn’t necessarily class-leading, it’s certainly up there in the mix...

Yeah, sure! :)

<this also makes one wonder the verasity of the 'class leading' dynamics claim>

11 August 2017

500lbs/ft ? I dont think so.

11 August 2017

that is good even more than the 3 litre petrol supercharged 380bhp model at 450 torque who says diesel is dead,load of crap talked about it ,diesel is a bye product of petrol anyway so you can't have one without the other ,also lower co2 nitrox about the same for new cars euro 6just get rid of pre 2006  diesels.also high compression petrol engines will be the next to hit the fan apparantly worse on nitrox than dieselsdue to high compression levels according to Autocar.

Cobalt is mainly mined in dcongo republic prices sensitive along with lithium so badly polluting to mine and will incrase significantly if electric vehicles take off.The whole policy is seriously flaweduntill you can use alternatives for the battery packs.

11 August 2017

XE in 'industry' spec. If you do 20k + miles a year and can afford it, get one of these. Driving position and dynamics soothe your soul better than a squishy dashboard. But touchscreens in cars are a stupid idea.

11 August 2017

The steering wheel, interior and the rear end still make me gag.

11 August 2017

ball to charge £420 for split folding rear seats, BMW only charge £255..

13 August 2017
Citytiger wrote:

ball to charge £420 for split folding rear seats, BMW only charge £255..

Was specing up one of these - pretty much all the tick-boxes are twice the BMW rates - reader-view camera, foldeing mirrors, the lot.

Yes, I know it's their profit margin on these cars, but people aren't stupid and notice this.

13 August 2017
gagaga wrote:

Citytiger wrote:

ball to charge £420 for split folding rear seats, BMW only charge £255..

Was specing up one of these - pretty much all the tick-boxes are twice the BMW rates - reader-view camera, foldeing mirrors, the lot.

Yes, I know it's their profit margin on these cars, but people aren't stupid and notice this.

Damn, my spelling gene is broken.

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