If you want to minimise your outlay and maximise your return, a modestly dressed CR-V would seem the way forward. All versions come with a three-year, 90,000-mile warranty with servicing according to how you drive it.

Fuel consumption varies from a really rather impressive 62.8mpg for the 1.6-litre diesel to the somewhat disastrous 37.7mpg of the 2.0-litre, all-wheel-drive petrol model with an automatic transmission that offers inferior performance to every other model in the range, 1.6-litre diesel included.

Matt Prior

Matt Prior

Road test editor
On CO2 the CR-V is competitive, but far from class leading

So unless you’re a one-legged man or woman with a pathological aversion to diesel, it’s very hard indeed to see why you’d bother. A standard 4WD 2.2-litre diesel manages just over 50mpg, a similar result to that achieved by the likes of the Toyota RAV4 and Kia Sportage when equipped with similar engines.

Find an Autocar car review

Explore the Honda range

Driven this week

  • Honda Civic
    Car review
    21 April 2017
    Honda’s 10th-generation Civic hatchback goes global — but is that good news?
  • Toyota Prius Plug-in
    First Drive
    21 April 2017
    Second-generation Toyota Prius Plug-in hybrid gets a bigger battery with new 39-mile electric range, more tech and styling updates, but it's expensive
  • Seat Ateca 1.4 EcoTSI 150 DSG
    First Drive
    20 April 2017
    Addition of DSG automatic gearbox in this top-spec model doesn't show the Ateca small SUV in its best light
  • Isuzu D-Max Blade
    First Drive
    20 April 2017
    Isuzu treats its rough-and-ready D-Max pick-up truck to a new engine, revised looks, better hauling ability and more equipment
  • MG ZS
    First Drive
    19 April 2017
    We drive MG’s upcoming Ford Ecosport rival in China-spec; good looks and a smart interior bode well for the UK version