From £26,065
Superb new diesel engine and same fine dynamics can't stop the X-type feeling its age.

Our Verdict

Jaguar XE

Jaguar's first attempt at a compact exec saloon is good - very good. But can the XE hold off the BMW 3 Series and Alfa Romeo Guilia to retain its crown?

  • First Drive

    Jaguar XE 2.0d 240 2017 review

    The all-wheel-drive version of the Jaguar XE gets a new range-topping 236bhp Ingenium diesel engine in a bid to take on the powerful oil-burners from the likes
  • First Drive

    Jaguar XE S 2017 review

    Updated range-topping Jaguar XE gets more power to enhance the appeal of one of the best sub-£55k performance saloons around
21 June 2005

Inserting a potent and refined new 2.2-litre turbodiesel under the bonnet of the Jaguar X-type has two very different effects on the overall package. Mechanically, this engine is identical to that found in the Ford Mondeo ST diesel. It’s a strong, linear motor with 153bhp at 3500rpm and 266lb ft of torque at just 1800rpm, or 295lb ft on temporary ‘overboost’. Mechanical smoothness is far better than in the Mondeo, to the extent that the engine sometimes feels like it has a couple of extra cylinders. 

The estate version felt friskier than the claimed 8.9sec 0-60mph time and it wasn’t difficult to wind the speedometer up to near the 134mph maximum. The only downside is the gear ratios: having the number ‘6’ on the gearlever may get the marketing boys in a lather, but the powerband in each gear is too narrow. Luckily, the X-type still has the chassis to express this excellent powertrain, even in front-wheel-drive guise. The steering is beautifully weighted and this Sport model has more damping composure than most owners will ever need.

But there is nothing that highlights the weaknesses of an ageing package like the late insertion of a heroic new component. The X-type wagon was never beautiful, but has always had a graceful line that this new bodykit savages remorselessly. Step inside and the X-type really shows its age. Poor-quality materials and a want of space are the main negatives, but some of the trim was ill-fitted on the test car and the grey inserts around the centre console looked cheap. On objective grounds the X-type has been left behind by the best in the class. But as an antidote to the small-German prestige epidemic, and for those who value refinement and handling, the 2.2 D is worth a look.

Just avoid the bodykit.

Chris Harris 

Join the debate

Comments
1

15 June 2016
which was helpfull for my website aslo.... feel like you will be motivated by clicking link in the

Add your comment

Log in or register to post comments

Find an Autocar car review

Driven this week

  • Genesis G70
    First Drive
    22 September 2017
    Based on the Kia Stinger, Genesis' new G70 saloon shows plenty of promising signs that it could be a hit in Europe
  • Lamborghini Aventador S
    First Drive
    22 September 2017
    Still visceral and dramatic as ever, but does the vast number of mechanical changes and tweaks help make the Lamborghini Aventador S more engaging?
  • Renault Koleos
    Car review
    22 September 2017
    Renault’s new crossover sees the Koleos name return, attached to an SUV of a quite different stripe
  • Nissan X-Trail
    First Drive
    21 September 2017
    On our first chance to get the facelifted Nissan X-Trail on UK roads, the petrol proves a viable alternative, although for outright pulling power the 2.0 dCi is the better bet
  • Alfa Romeo Stelvio 2.2d 210
    First Drive
    21 September 2017
    Most powerful diesel version of the Alfa Romeo Stelvio is swift and more frugal than its closest rivals, but makes less sense than the range-topping petrol version