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Rear-drive V8 version of the former 4WD FF V12 is a quick, long-legged GT that offers things others don’t

Our Verdict

Ferrari GTC4 Lusso

Ferrari's four-wheel-drive GT car has been updated, the replacement for the FF, and find out if the GTC4 Lusso is worthy of its famous name

  • First Drive

    Ferrari GTC4 Lusso T 2018 review

    Rear-drive V8 version of the former 4WD FF V12 is a quick, long-legged GT that offers things others don’t
  • First Drive

    Ferrari GTC4 Lusso 2017 UK review

    Does the Ferrari FF replacement serve up Maranello’s famed driver involvement while also offering limo-like levels of luxury?
Steve Cropley Autocar
22 February 2018

What is it?

It probably doesn’t sound flattering to suggest that Ferrari’s latest four-seater, the GTC4 Lusso T, is made up of a convenient collection of pre-existing components and assemblies, given that, like every modern Ferrari, it delivers exalted performance and impressive looks. 

Yet it’s true: every element of this car was built in the first place for a different purpose than this one, and it seems legitimate to speculate on how the buyer – who is being asked to pay a price starting at more than £200,000 and extending beyond £250,000 if you choose the options fitted to our test car – feels about that. Most big-name supercars have a very singular provenance.

In this case, the large (4.92m-long) four-seat body started life in the four-wheel-drive FF, a car created to persuade the faithful to take a Ferrari away on skiing weekends rather than the family SUV. The FF’s mighty, normally aspirated V12 is replaced in the Lusso T by a twin-turbo V8, mainly because that’s what Ferrari mostly makes now, to get the CO2 numbers down. Even the use of the Lusso name, borrowed from a couple of distinguished historic Ferrari models, looks more a matter of expediency than sentiment. Ferrari under CEO Sergio Marchionne is a more commercial enterprise than ever, and maybe this is some of the evidence.

What's it like?

So to the burning questions. Is this a great car? Is it a great Ferrari? Well, it’s certainly big, as noted, but that hardly matters when it’s intended as a very low, long-wheelbase, long-distance GT that genuinely lets four medium-sized adults (rather than giants) settle into its firm, beautifully made seats. And especially when Ferrari owners generally have other cars they can drive in the congested parts of towns. Having said which, the Lusso’s too-generous width may give you an uncomfortable time on your way out of town, heading for the roads where you can give the car its head.

Once in its natural habitat, the Lusso T is enormously quick and capable, with near-instant throttle response (one of the reasons its 3855cc engine has dual twin-scroll turbos) and 602bhp at 7500rpm. 

Much of the car’s controls are familiar from the FF, including the five-mode steering-wheel-mounted manettino, which never fails (even in this comparatively huge machine) to make you think Formula 1. The 0-60mph time is in the low three-second area, and you can do (effectively) 200mph if you can find the place. The V8 will seem fabulous to anyone who hasn’t driven a V12, but there’s a magnificent depth to that most original of Ferrari engines, the 12-pot, that makes it even better.  

The low centre of gravity, the exaggeratedly rear-mounted cabin, the long wheelbase and the better weight distribution of the more centrally mounted V8 all combine to give the Lusso a superbly flat ride, even though it’s never anywhere near soft. The Magneride adjustable dampers offer you anything from firm to rock hard, but as with most Ferraris, we found Sport was the right setting. The steering is accurate, firm and quick-acting, another aid to manoeuvring a machine that usually feels agile for its size.

Should I buy one?

Will the Lusso T prosper? Ferraris that aren’t pure two-seaters rarely hit the absolute front rank of Prancing Horse popularity. Still, if carrying four really matters to you and you don’t mind sacrificing a few percent of dynamic excellence for the purpose, this is one of the rare full-on supercars that will do it. And in style.

Ferrari GTC4 Lusso T Specifications:

Where Surrey On sale Now Price £200,165 Engine V8, 3855cc, twin-turbo, petrol Power 602bhp at 7500rpm Torque 561lb ft at 3000-5250rpm Gearbox 7-spd dual-clutch automatic Kerb weight 1865kg 0-62mph 3.5sec Top speed 199mph Economy 24.4mpg (combined) CO2, tax band 265g/km, 37% Rivals Bentley Continental GT, Mercedes-AMG S63 Coupé

Join the debate

Comments
19

22 February 2018

New 508 looks better, worst looking Ferrari yet IMHO (until the SUV arrives)

typos1 - Just can’t respect opinion

26 February 2018

Really ? I love it, the best looking and best Ferrari. Pity the V8 lacks 4wd.

XXXX just went POP.

22 February 2018

Not very often a White Supercar looks great, but, this kinda works....!

Peter Cavellini.

22 February 2018
I fear that time is running out for Ferrari.

22 February 2018

Very very sad days...

RIP Ferrari too ?

 

 

 

 

22 February 2018

Well done for labouring the joy of the V12, Steve. 

 

This is a weird car, and none the worse for that. But putting a bland little V8 turbo in it is a hideous idea, irrespective of performance.

 

Get the V12, or don't bother at all.

23 February 2018
eseaton wrote:

Well done for labouring the joy of the V12, Steve. 

 

This is a weird car, and none the worse for that. But putting a bland little V8 turbo in it is a hideous idea, irrespective of performance.

 

Get the V12, or don't bother at all.

Like the majority of BMW 1 Series drivers could not tell which wheels were driven, I don't think the majority of buyers of this Ferrari care whether it's V12 or not.

23 February 2018

It is an offense for all british-built supercars to test Ferraris in this mag. We should award them two stars by default, not the usual three and a half. Shame. Westfields are better built, and new TVR will be much more advanced from a technologiacl standpoint. Miss the Allegro too.

23 February 2018

Will love to own one one day

23 February 2018

I find the design quite stunning and even more so in person having seeing several close up but that's  just my opinion.  As a true petrol head I think it's fantastic that Ferrari offers such a model, even if it is not to all tastes, and it's something I can only dream of owning but what a dream. 

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