From £18,2657
The new Citroën C4 Picasso impresses with improved quality and usability, but dynamics disappoint

What is it?

The all-new Citroën C4 Picasso is still its maker's medium-sized MPV, but apart from the name, it shares little in common with the model it replaces.

It’s the first of more than 20 models that’ll use the new EMP2 platform from the PSA Peugeot Citroën group. Following the trend, the new model is claimed to be 140kg lighter than the old one, with half of that weight loss coming from the platform and the rest from a body construction that uses an aluminium bonnet and a composite tailgate. Launch models are five-seaters; a seven-seat version will come later in the year. 

The new platform allows the C4 Picasso to be 40mm shorter overall than before, but with a 55mm-longer wheelbase.

Citroën's rival to the Ford C-Max and Renault Scenic sends a strong message about what the company is planning for its renewed C-series models, both in terms of styling and engineering. A wild front end with slim LED daytime running lights makes it look a bit outlandish, but Citroën promises that from now on it's not only its DS models that will have a strong personality. 

What's it like?

We drove the 1.6 e-HDi diesel version with 115bhp, which is expected to be the best-seller. The engine has been updated with its compression ratio reduced to 16:1, new five-hole injectors, a new EGR valve and new pistons. Power is the same as before but there’s more available torque at low revs and fuel economy now hits a claimed 70mpg. Top speed is 117mph and the 0-62mph sprint takes 11.8sec.

The engine is nice responsiveness at low revs during city driving, and the six-speed manual gearbox is slick and easy to operate. There’ll be an improved version of the old robotised ’box, too. It offers a tight turning circle of 10.8 metres, and visibility is good thanks to slim front pillars.

This, coupled to a typically high driving position, makes it an easy MPV to drive around town – as long as the Tarmac is smooth. If it’s not, the ride isn't as comfortable as you may expect.

On winding, the new C4 Picasso handles safely and predictably, although it fails to inspire. However, thanks to a lower centre of gravity it leans less than the old car and is more precise in every situation. The new car's increased torsional stiffness is also evident, but the steering lacks feel and understeer comes relatively soon, in turn putting the ESP to work in a most decided manner. Motorway cruising is much better, with low wind, engine and road noises.

This is a car more about its cabin than the joy of driving. Interior space impressed, particularly in the rear where you'll find three seats. These can be folded or slid forward, increasing boot capacity from 537 litres to 630 litres. The front passenger can also enjoy an optional 'Relax' package that includes an electrically operated calf rest, headrests with side flaps and even back massage.

The one stand-out in the new C4 Picasso is the increase in perceived quality. It's much better than the old model and could be the best Citroën yet in this regard.

Back to top

A pair of digital monitors take care of all the on-board multimedia. A panoramic 12in screen includes all the usual driving instruments and sat-nav, and can be configured to show other information or even a picture uploaded by the owner. A separate 7in touchscreen with seven buttons commands everything else, from the air conditioning to internet access, which is made possible via a USB key.

Should I buy one?

If you’re looking for a roomy and versatile medium-size MPV with decent city performance and very good fuel economy, this might be the right car. Providing, that is, you can live with the UFO styling and don’t care much about driving dynamics.

Francisco Mota

Citroën C4 Picasso 1.6 e-HDi

Price: tba; 0-62 11.8sec; Top speed 117 mph: Economy 70mpg (combined); CO2 105g/km; Kerb weight 1298 kg; Engine 4 cyls, 1560cc, turbodiesel; Power 115bhp at 3600 rpm; Torque 200lb ft at 1750rpm; Gearbox 6-spd manual

Join the debate

Comments
25
Add a comment…
BenC30 4 June 2013

Picasso

If I remember correctly, the Xsara Picasso was the best selling car of its size, which was hardly known for driving dynamics. People who buy these don't worry about it. They want something comfortable, economical, a bit of space and with a little bit of kit.

It has far much more character than the bland C-Max and really hope it does well. It looks great.

Oilburner 3 June 2013

Technology

We love the level of tech on our current C4 Grand Picasso, but agree that it needs to be tempered with common sense in how its used and controlled.

It doesn't help with Citroën that the programmers and designers seem to be disconnected from the real world usage of the car.  Check control warnings (e.g. bulb failure) are hidden within layers of menu with no indicator light etc.  Pointless features like "distance to destination" are given a high degree of prominence.  The climate system controls are poorly conceived. The official PSA iPod adaptor has some of the worst software I've ever seen and lots more school boy errors besides.  For instance, why, in all the menus of options and controls can't I turn off the folding mirrors when the doors lock? Why have they spent money on automatic door pocket lights and an integrated air freshener (yes really) but neglected to include wiper fluid level on the check control?

The implementation of similar features on my Mondeo is so much better, although a little boring in comparison with the layout and style of the C4 GP.

On another note, handling is important, but only in the sense that the car shouldn't roll so much that the kids are chucking up in the back on every journey!  The current car, even with the rear air suspension ours has, is not very good in that regard, so I was hoping for better.

Maxecat 3 June 2013

Oilburner wrote: On another

Oilburner wrote:

On another note, handling is important, but only in the sense that the car shouldn't roll so much that the kids are chucking up in the back on every journey!  The current car, even with the rear air suspension ours has, is not very good in that regard, so I was hoping for better.

Citroen have fitted to the new C4 Picasso a cunning roll control device that you can use to prevent the car rolling so much your children throwup.

This device is located near the floor and is operated by the drivers right foot, it is the pedal on the far right. To benefit from this roll reduction device you simply do not press it so far down as you were when the rolling became excessive.

Enjoy your motoring but remember your passengers may not enjoy attempt to drive an MPV as a sports car.

Oilburner 4 June 2013

Aha, but that's the point, isn't it?

Maxecat wrote:

Enjoy your motoring but remember your passengers may not enjoy attempt to drive an MPV as a sports car.

lol!  The funny thing is, when I drive my Mondeo in the same fashion, it doesn't seem to need the "roll control device" and the kids are fine.  Smile  That's why journos love the Mondeo and look down on the likes of this Citroen.  I have to say, driving both, I'd agree with them, for once.  The old Zafira we had with SRI suspension was pretty good too.  I hear the S-Max is great, so MPVs don't have to be this bad.

fadyady 1 June 2013

Touchscreens vs buttons

I think the folks above are making a valid point about the need to get used to the touchscreens.

Buttons and dials are far more intuitive to use. While touchscreens take some time getting used to.