Lightweight, RS5-based two-seater concept gets aluminium bodywork and a five-pot motor
1 October 2010

Audi is celebrating the 30th anniversary of its iconic Quattro with this Paris show star: the Quattro Concept.

Based on a shortened RS5 platform, the concept is actually closer in spirit to 1984’s Sport Quattro, a more compact version of the original coupé that was designed to improve the car’s agility on the world’s rallying stages.

See the official pics of the Audi Quattro Concept - now updated with show pics

Volkswagen Group CEO Martin Winterkorn has told Autocar he wants the firm "to do" the Quattro, with the possibility of it entering production within three years. He said the cost of putting a new body on an existing platform was between 400-500 million euro and this money would be recouped by either high volume or high prices. If it makes production, Winterkorn expects a combination of both strategies in making and selling the car: around 30-35,000 Quattro units would be made per year with a "solid price" tag.

The concept’s wheelbase is 150mm shorter than the RS5’s, its roofline is around 40mm lower and the 4.28m overall length is around the same as a Volkswagen Scirocco’s. That's 200mm shorter than an Audi A5. Unlike the RS5, though, the concept is a strict two-seater.

Most of the bodywork is aluminium, but the bonnet and rear hatchback are carbonfibre. Audi says the car weighs approximately 1300kg, around the same as the Sport Quattro.

Power comes from a 408bhp version of the TT RS’s twin-turbocharged five-pot, mounted north-south insetad of its transverse installation in the TT-RS. This is comfortably more than the 300bhp of the original roadgoing special. It is mated to a six-speed manual gearbox and the Quattro is good for 0-62mph in just 3.9sec.

Like the RS5, the Quattro "has full four-wheel-drive, not the TT's [part-time] Haldex system," the Quattro Concept's designer, Steve Lewis, told Autocar.

Read more on Audi's other show car, the 'S1' 1.4 TFSI

The front styling is dominated by a huge rectangular grille, while the side profile’s key feature is an extra-thick C-pillar that also has Audi’s four-ring logo stamped into its metal. No images of the cabin have been released, but Audi says it features a slender, ‘floating’ dashboard and bucket seats that are 40 per cent lighter than regular items.

The concept was built at Volkswagen Group's latest acquisition, Italdesign, which has form in producing limited-run sports cars, such as the BMW M1. However, even if it does get the green light, don't expect a public announcement on that for another year.

John McIlroy/Matt Prior

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Comments
21

29 September 2010

Quite appealing looks in a very un-Audi like way. But for a car with Aluminium and Carbon fiber bodywork 1300 kg is very heavy. Is this going to see production in some form in the future? I hope it does

29 September 2010

Could this be a big clue to the R4 then?

29 September 2010

The TTRS is 1450kgs, so they have done well to take 150kgs off that.

29 September 2010

And yet like all VW's/audi's- and probably future Porsches now, of the last 20 odd years the controls will be numb and lifeless. What a waste of time, and intelligent engineers. Will this feel any better to drive than anything else? A short and light RS5 is nothing more than a short and light RS5, its still basically the same thing- which most agree doesn't even match a M3.

I wonder if there is a market for companies that engineer in feel to cars; maybe replace electric steering back to hydraulic, is it possible? j

30 September 2010

[quote iploss] The TTRS is 1450kgs, so they have done well to take 150kgs off that.
[/quote]

But it's based on the A5 platform so that's an even bigger achievement!

30 September 2010

I really like this, especially from the rear. It has a muscularity most Audis don't have.


30 September 2010

Indeed but I'd rather go for an Original or S1 firebreathing rallycross special...

30 September 2010

just another audi hate'rr , the boys at audi did a good job of this concept it look good and seems to have very good BHP ,and its light to hope its comes into production, audi is differently growing faster then bmw and mercedes.

30 September 2010

[quote jl4069]I wonder if there is a market for companies that engineer in feel to cars; maybe replace electric steering back to hydraulic, is it possible?[/quote]

Does anyone know exactly how much mpg improves with electric power steering? Surely not by much? This is the only justification I have come across; is there another? I have read a number of very critical reviews of zero feel on electric systems, especially on the new 5 series.

30 September 2010

[quote jl4069]

And yet like all VW's/audi's- and probably future Porsches now, of the last 20 odd years the controls will be numb and lifeless. What a waste of time, and intelligent engineers. Will this feel any better to drive than anything else? A short and light RS5 is nothing more than a short and light RS5, its still basically the same thing- which most agree doesn't even match a M3.

I wonder if there is a market for companies that engineer in feel to cars; maybe replace electric steering back to hydraulic, is it possible? j

[/quote]

Most cars have a lack of response in the steering these days. A few years ago I had the chance to drive a SAAB 99 EMS. Weighing in at just 1150kg and sporting 125hp the EMS makes for an engaging drive even when it's over 30 years old. However that didn't stop me from nearly crashing it on the first corner because I'd forgot the effort you have to put in to make a car without Power-steering turn. Considering Audi enables you to adjust so many settings, they should give people the chance to dial in the amount of road-feedback you want.

Personally I think AUDI have done a good job on this. It's not oversized like their current line-up and it's light-weight considering the standard amount of electrics required by law for a modern car to have. A shortened wheel-base completely changes a vehicle. Considering nobody has driven the car, nobody can it can't match an M3. This car produces 323hp per tonne, where as the current M3 has 253hp per tonne and that me using the M3's unladen weight and the the max weight of 2003kg. Taking just the 70hp power to weight difference I think if this Audi went into production it would certainly have engineers at BMW thinking how to trump it.

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