Café, lounge, holdall: it’s all of these things, but its copybook has finally been blotted
8 November 2016

The Golf has gone back to school.

With my daughter starting her crucial last year of GCSEs, I’ve swiftly discovered that a suite of modern exams demands a lot from a car.

Every Monday morning the Golf is loaded up with an A2 art and textiles folder containing two heavily laden A1 books, along with a guitar, a huge pile of coursework and revision books and some PE kit. The Golf’s boot copes admirably. Its 380-litre capacity is more than a Ford Focus’s and the load bay is low and wide.

If we’re running late, which we often are, it also needs to act as an impromptu café for our breakfast. At these times, the two cupholders in the centre console and big pockets in the front doors have proved handy.

We’re also visiting a couple of private tutors each week, so I’ve started using the Golf as a mobile living room, and it’s a decent place to spend an hour, listening to podcasts via Apple CarPlay or typing up notes on a laptop.

One thing that’s eluded me so far has been the ability to add my favourite stations to the radio, so I’m still scrolling through lots of submenus to change stations. The satnav has proved frustrating at times, too. It requires you to enter a full address rather than just a postcode.

The Golf has also broken its run of faultlessness. Within a day of topping the 10,000-mile mark, the oil level warning light flashed up on the dashboard. The level had dropped to the minimum mark a lot sooner than I’d have expected, so I’ll monitor this over the next few months.

A lunchtime dash to the nearest car accessory shop for four litres of Castrol long-life oil rectified the situation. However, it was the first time in four months of ownership that the VW had done anything other than demand petrol once a week. 

Sat-nav issues

The Golf’s sat-nav display is clear and bright in day mode, but when it switches to night mode the map background turns inky black and small roads are so pale that they’re almost impossible to see.

I was pleased to find that it can be set permanently to day mode, so I can now navigate country lanes in the dark without getting lost.

Claire Evans

VOLKSWAGEN GOLF 1.0 TSI 115 MATCH BLUEMOTION EDITION

Price £20,735 Price as tested £21,120 Economy 51.3mpg Faults None Expenses Oil £46.99 Last seen 28.9.16

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Comments
16

8 November 2016
Looks like another VW lemon. Who knows what frauds lurk in its software. If you are driving 30000 miles a year, you need an efficient and reliable car. I suggest unloading the Golf and buying a good Toyota hybrid before the VW causes you more grief.

8 November 2016
The oil use is quite excessive for a 1.0l engine. Also, how the hell do you fit 2 A1 books into an A2 folder? Something smells fishy.

A34

8 November 2016
redoedi wrote:

The oil use is quite excessive for a 1.0l engine.

So maybe £2 per 1000 miles for cost of (petrol station priced) oil (or per 20 gallons petrol). Not too much of a premium. But perhaps Autocar didn't run the car in (which would correlate to not being able to work out how to operate the radio station store or sat nav postcode entry).

redoedi wrote:

Also, how the hell do you fit 2 A1 books into an A2 folder? Something smells fishy.

Fold them in half. :)

8 November 2016
A34 wrote:
redoedi wrote:

The oil use is quite excessive for a 1.0l engine.

So maybe £2 per 1000 miles for cost of (petrol station priced) oil (or per 20 gallons petrol). Not too much of a premium. But perhaps Autocar didn't run the car in (which would correlate to not being able to work out how to operate the radio station store or sat nav postcode entry).

redoedi wrote:

Also, how the hell do you fit 2 A1 books into an A2 folder? Something smells fishy.

Fold them in half. :)

Maybe she got her ones and twos confused. An A1 folders is the norm for Art students, and my one (back in the day) was invariably stuffed with two A2 'books'...

8 November 2016
I do hope that the driver is not drinking and eating at the wheel.....

8 November 2016
Oh my god CamperMan is going to go mental with this diesel rivalling 'Real World' figure from a petrol.

Can't remember the last time I've put in more than a litre of oil after 10,000 miles though.

 

Hydrogen cars just went POP

8 November 2016
xxxx wrote:

Oh my god CamperMan is going to go mental with this diesel rivalling 'Real World' figure from a petrol.

Can't remember the last time I've put in more than a litre of oil after 10,000 miles though.

Campervan just laughs if xxxx thinks a real world fuel consumption of 51 mpg is good for such a low powered car. My 2009 civic manages 56 mpg from a 2.2 litre engine on local runs and over 60 mpg on a long run when keeping the speed under 60mph. And that s from an engine that is quite old in design terms but has far better power/ torque for everyday use.
The journalist who praises the size of the Golf's boot has obviously not seen the far larger Honda Civic boot.

8 November 2016
Campervan wrote:
xxxx wrote:

Oh my god CamperMan is going to go mental with this diesel rivalling 'Real World' figure from a petrol.

Can't remember the last time I've put in more than a litre of oil after 10,000 miles though.

Campervan just laughs if xxxx thinks a real world fuel consumption of 51 mpg is good for such a low powered car. My 2009 civic manages 56 mpg from a 2.2 litre engine on local runs and over 60 mpg on a long run when keeping the speed under 60mph. ....

In fairness to myself I only said 'rivalling' not beating it and I can only go by journo's figures not particular owners who may be biased. Also just think how much more it cost to make that 2.2 Diesel compared to the 3 cylinder 1.0 petrol!

 

Hydrogen cars just went POP

8 November 2016
I'm liking campervan's thinking...my 2013 Civic 1.6 iDTEC managed 58 mpg average no problem and if its practicality you want i have a 15 year old with art folders, a 5 year old with martial arts kit and a dog to carry around and the civic was the best at it, no contest. Those magic seats truly are magic for dog transport! (sadly not on the 2017 civic i see :()

289

8 November 2016
I am surprised that an Autocar staffer is surprised at the oil level being low.
VW products are well known for using oil as they bed down, and other than relying on a warning light it is entirely possible to run a new car out of oil and destroy the engine... it even says so in the handbook (not that anyone bothers to read them nowadays.
People are becoming lazy, and in some cases incompetent...is it really too much trouble to dip the oil level particularly given the financial implications of running out?
In my opinion everyone with a driving licence should be able to change a wheel (even though some cars don't have spares anymore), regulate oil and water levels. It just isn't feasible to purely rely on electronics to save your effort.

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