Currently reading: Stellantis to introduce battery swap stations from 2024
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Stellantis will launch a network of battery swap stations that can fit a fully charged battery to an EV "in less than five minutes".

The technology, developed by San Francisco-based Ample and backed by Vauxhall parent Stellantis, will be rolled out on a subscription basis and be introduced in Madrid, Spain, next year. Further sites will follow, although the brand is remaining tight-lipped on locations and timelines.

It will initially be available for only the electric Fiat 500 but the system will be expanded to accommodate every marque in the Stellantis stable, including CitroënPeugeot, Jeep and Maserati.

It has been conceived to make gaining a fully charged battery "as fast and convenient as refuelling with gas", according to Stellantis. Cars will be recognised on arrival, with drivers using an app to initiate the swapping process.

It follows a similar set-up by Chinese EV brand Nio, which has more than 1300 of its Power Swap Stations in service across its home nation, with a further 13 in several central European countries. Plans for the UK have previously been mooted.

For Stellantis’s tech, the swappable modular batteries have been designed as "drop-in replacements" for existing packs used by any electric car. It allows Stellantis to integrate its batteries without re-engineering platforms, saving cash. 

“Ample’s Modular Battery Swapping solution has the opportunity to offer our customers greater energy efficiency, outstanding performance and lower range anxiety. We are looking forward to executing the initial programme with our stellar Fiat 500e,” Stellantis senior vice president Ricardo Stamatti said.

According to Stellantis, the swap stations can be constructed and fully operational in "as little as three days".

Ample CEO Khaled Hassounah said: “The combination of offering compelling electric vehicles that can also receive a full charge in less than five minutes will help remove the remaining impediments to electric vehicle adoption.”

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Jonathan Bryce

Jonathan Bryce
Title: Editorial Apprentice

Jonathan is an editorial apprentice working with Autocar. He has held this position since September 2022, having graduated from the University of Glasgow with a degree in Geography and Business & Management before moving to London to pursue a career in motoring journalism. 

His role at work involves writing news stories, updating and uploading articles for the Autocar website and making sure they are optimised for search engines, helping with social media and building his experience overall.

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Is it Just Me 8 December 2023

If manufactures are serious and fully committed to battery swapping and can bring to market and implement fairly quickly, this could be a real game changer for many and electric transport finally for the masses.

This could remove a lot of the negative aspects about owning electric, You would remove the need for charging the car usability would be more like refuelling an ICE vehicle and if not having to purchase a fixed battery meant a reduction of high purchase prices due to battery cost that would be progress indeed.

Not being stuck with one large ageing component the battery could also be a massive technological and ecological win both for owner and manufacturer the prospect of the largest component being swapable replaceable and updatable, insurers would like that too I would imagine. It’s how it’s implemented is the big question but if it can be made to work could be a great step forward.                          

Is it Just Me 8 December 2023

If manufactures are serious and fully committed to battery swapping and can bring to market and implement fairly quickly this could be a real game changer for many and electric transport finally for the masses.

This could remove a lot of the negative aspects about owning electric, You would remove the need for charging the car usability would be more like refuelling an ICE vehicle and if not having to purchase a fixed battery meant a reduction of high purchase prices due to battery cost that would be progress indeed.

Also not being stuck with one large ageing component the battery could also be a massive technological and ecological win both for owner and manufacturer the prospect of the largest component being swapable replaceable and updatable, insurers would like that too I would imagine it’s how it’s implemented is the big question but if it can be made to work could be a great step forward.                          

harf 7 December 2023

I do wonder whether battery swap capability should be mandated for all manufacturers. Bemoan ICE vehicles emissions all you like but they're repairable.

How sustainable is a car where one cell fails and because it's been built into the vehicle structure, and it's inaccessible, it writes off the car.

Nonsense. 

xxxx 8 December 2023
harf wrote:

How sustainable is a car where one cell fails and because it's been built into the vehicle structure, and it's inaccessible, it writes off the car.

Nonsense. 

Rubbish, Tesla batteries are built in an they're replaceable.