We take a ride with Rimac's test driver to see what all the fuss is about

Only eight Rimac Concept One supercars were built. Now, there are only seven after a notorious crash involving Richard Hammond.

Given they are all customer cars, it’s not surprising that I find myself in the passenger rather than driver’s seat for my brief ride in the car, sitting alongside Rimac test driver Miroslav Zrncevic.

This car is owned by Paul Runge, an electric car fan and retinal surgeon based in Florida, who is disarmingly relaxed about us taking his car out for a spin. If I’d just bought a £1m supercar, I’d be keeping a tight hold on the keys.

I’ve heard plenty about the Concept One, most notably its 0-62mph time of a hairy 2.5sec. That’s faster than a McLaren P1 and Ferrari LaFerrari.

Still, despite the figures, it’s easy to be sceptical of these fairly unknown electric supercar brands coming out of the woodwork (think Vanda Dendrobium, Nio EP9), with plenty of raucous claims on performance that surpass the established brands. This very car took a long time to come to fruition; it was first seen in 2011 at the Frankfurt motor show.

But it’s also an exciting time, because often these are the companies that are pushing the boundaries of what can be done with electric cars, not constrained by price or selling to the masses like so many mainstream car makers.

Before getting in the car, chief operating officer Monika Mikac told me about how Rimac built its own infotainment system – not because the company wanted to but because it got quoted a huge €20m for buying a system from a supplier – and how impressive it is. My initial thought was: impressive, schimpressive. There’s plenty of decent infotainment systems out there and plenty of mediocre ones; this will fit into one of those categories. I was wrong. Everything you can think of is accessible via this Rimac touchscreen. Choose your torque distribution between the front and rear? Yes. Overlay graphs on power, motor speed and torque from a period of time? You can. Raise your suspension for a speed bump? Sure. You get the idea. It’s damn impressive.

So, let’s get to the good bit. We’re on a private estate near Monterey, California, which gives Zrncevic the perfect excuse to show me quite what this beast is capable of.

The electric Concept One is a 1224bhp car with a combined torque figure of 1180lb ft. It has four motors, one on each wheel, making it four-wheel drive. The powertrain also enables all-wheel torque vectoring, with each wheel able to accelerate or decelerate a hundred times per second – that’s something else you can witness on the infotainment system.

The claimed 0-62mph time is 2.6sec. We get out into a fairly straight piece of open road and Zrncevic puts his foot down. As with all electric cars, torque is instant, which is why these powertrains are so perfect for supercars. But this is so fast and so unnervingly quiet, it takes my breath away. And that wasn’t quite from a standing start, so it could go even faster yet.

We don’t get much of a chance to chuck it around corners on our short run, not least because I’m sure Zrncevic is under strict instructions to keep Runge’s car safe, but the clever torque vectoring system leaves it in good stead for promising handling.

I ask Zrncevic what the advantages are of this over your average Porsche or Bugatti. As well as observing that the torque vectoring system is like no other, he sums it up with this: “We benchmarked this car against the 918 Spyder, the Veyron and the LaFerrari. This is way faster.”

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Comments
17

28 August 2017

Apparently there are people who believe a tyre destroying 0-62 number is all that matters.

28 August 2017
Autocar wrote:

The powertrain also enables all-wheel torque vectoring, with each wheel able to accelerate or decelerate a hundred times per second – that’s something else you can witness on the infotainment system.

Watch the infotainment screen, to see the varying torque split, whilst accelerating like the clappers. What a great idea...

Citroëniste.

28 August 2017
Bob Cholmondeley wrote:

Autocar wrote:

The powertrain also enables all-wheel torque vectoring, with each wheel able to accelerate or decelerate a hundred times per second – that’s something else you can witness on the infotainment system.

Watch the infotainment screen, to see the varying torque split, whilst accelerating like the clappers. What a great idea...

No one, least of all Autocar or Rimac  expects the driver/owner of this fabulous car to study the all wheel torque vectoring read outs on the Infotainment screen whilst they are enjoying the incredible performance this car is capable of, so I can only presume your comment was facetious. I am certain this information will be data logged for the owner to recall after the drive, and able to be uploaded to a computer for later analysis and making a detailed record of the vehicle usage and performance. Fantastic technology to be marvelled at and enjoyed through articles such as this one in Autocar. It's sad to me, you appear to have so little true appreciation of this incredible technology, and appear only able to make incredibly purile remarks regarding some of the vehicles incredible capabilities. 

 

 

28 August 2017
James Dene wrote:

Apparently there are people who believe a tyre destroying 0-62 number is all that matters.

Are there? I think most people realise it's an important metric but not the only one. If you give a car a powerful motor and a lot of traction, one result (among several) will be rapid acceleration from a standing start. Are you saying that's a bad thing?

29 August 2017

Good ol' USofA

R Adams

28 August 2017

I know Monterey.  This is precisely how this car will be driven on a regular basis. Creep around, find a straight, nail it for a couple of seconds, creep home.

Q for engineers: how much unsprung weight does a motor on each wheel add?

28 August 2017

It has a motor for each wheel, not a motor on each wheel.  They are connected by driveshafts so the unsprung weight would be similar to the driven wheels on an internal combustion powered car.  Just sloppy writing causing confusion (not for the first time).

28 August 2017

   I want to drive from Vancouver, BC to Calgary, AB. Which will get me there quicker, the mighty Rimac or a plain old Golf? The distance is 1000 km.

28 August 2017
Stupid comment Cowichan. Comparing apples and oranges. I want to drive from Vancouver, BC to Calvary, AB. Which will get me there quicker, the mighty Bugatti Veyron or the Ford Mondeo Diesel?

29 August 2017

At some unstated speed, but certainly only a fraction of its 200+ mph top speed, the 2017 Rimac has a range of 350 km. While your Veyron can fill at any gas station and go, the Rimac needs some time at the end of an electrical cord. It's a stunt machine, not an automobile. I'll take the Golf. Or your Veyron.

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