The manufacturers' new electric cars will get higher capacity batteries and faster charging times; clean energy sources will be used
13 June 2016

PSA Peugeot Citroën's next-generation lithium ion batteries and chargers are set to offer faster charging times and reduced range anxiety for battery electric vehicle (BEV) owners.

Future plug-in hybrids (PHEVs) will have 12kWh batteries (13kWh for SUVs), which are 12 times the capacity of existing PHEV packs and claimed to be 20-30% more powerful than competitors’, at 80kW and 90kW respectively.

Read more: Peugeot, Citroën and DS outline plans for electric and hybrid future

These batteries’ operating range is 210-350V (240-400V for the SUV). A 3.3kW onboard charger tops up PHEV batteries in 4.5 hours, or 2.5 hours if a 6.6kW fast charger is installed.

The BEVs' 7kW onboard charger can deliver enough charge in 90 minutes to drive 62 miles, while a full charge will take eight hours. A wall-mounted fast charger can deliver an 80% charge in 30 minutes, or 7.5 miles of additional range per minute of charging.

Clean electricity needed for clean future

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PSA Group chairman Carlos Tavares has sent out a clear message that clean energy sources are vital for the electrification of cars.

“Having clean powertrain technologies and zero-emissions mobility devices is not enough,” he said. “If the energy generation process is not clean then it is not going to deliver an appropriate result.”

The PSA Group’s commercial rebirth under its ‘Push to Pass’ strategy will be driven by a focus on innovation and sustainable technology.

“This is an engineers' company,” Tavares added. “It has always been that way and will continue to be that way.”

An increase in efficiency of research and development activity is expected to save €1.5 billion (£1.14bn) in five years, or €300m (£228m) per year. PSA plans to motivate engineers by giving them back the savings to invest in new programmes.

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Comments
7

13 June 2016
I don't understand this claim in the article (prior to any editing) that 12kWh is '12 times the capacity of existing PHEV packs'? The Outlander PHEV already has a 12kWh pack, the Chevrolet Volt/Vauxhall Ampera 16-ish kWh and even the outgoing Plug-in Prius has 4.4kWh.

The charger specifications don't seem remotely special either.

289

13 June 2016
....where is that going to come from then?

13 June 2016
289 wrote:

....where is that going to come from then?

Some from wind power(around 11% in 2015 and growing year on year), some from solar (not much in UK but growing year on year ) big chunk from nuclear (although not everyone says is clean). As to the future, well Wind power/ solar power generation is increasing faster than the rate of EV cars capacity to take it.
As a footnote some states in Germany are producing around 50% of their power needs via wind turbines

typos1 - Just can’t respect opinion

13 June 2016
At least there is more chance of there being 'clean electricity' than there is of 'clean petrol/diesel'.

13 June 2016
Some of their MPs are pushing for the sale of new ICE cars to end in 2025. The final detail of exclusions wasn't covered in this article or the percentage of support. The way I read it they also get all their electricity from renewables. We need to pick our game up.

13 June 2016
Walking wrote:

Some of their MPs are pushing for the sale of new ICE cars to end in 2025. The final detail of exclusions wasn't covered in this article or the percentage of support. The way I read it they also get all their electricity from renewables. We need to pick our game up.

Meanwhile the Norwegians far from being green make virtually all of their countries income from selling huge amounts of oil and gas to everyone else.
Look at how green we are they say, whilst pocketing billions from the oil and gas industry. What Hippocrates.

13 June 2016
Campervan wrote:
Walking wrote:

Some of their MPs are pushing for the sale of new ICE cars to end in 2025. The final detail of exclusions wasn't covered in this article or the percentage of support. The way I read it they also get all their electricity from renewables. We need to pick our game up.

Meanwhile the Norwegians far from being green make virtually all of their countries income from selling huge amounts of oil and gas to everyone else.
Look at how green we are they say, whilst pocketing billions from the oil and gas industry. What Hippocrates.

In which case more countries should follow the Norwegian example and look at how THEY can increase wind power etc.

typos1 - Just can’t respect opinion

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