Details of the most extreme Nissan GT-R revealed
8 January 2009

The Nissan GT-R Spec V, the long-awaited extreme version of Nissan’s Porsche 911 Turbo rival, has finally been revealed.

The new Nissan GT-R Spec V is a limited-edition special: lighter, rarer and considerably more expensive than the standard Nissan GT-R. And it will be coming to Europe in 2009.

The GT-R Spec V is based on the facelifted GT-R that was launched in Japan just before Christmas.>> See more pics of the Nissan GT-R Spec V

This means that the Spec V doesn’t get the rumoured 550bhp engine, but it does get the latest-spec 485bhp twin-turbo V6. It also gets a special boost control function, increasing the 434lb ft of torque by an extra 15lb ft at 3500-5000rpm.

The ECU automatically raises boost pressure when the system is in operation, or the extra shove can be engaged manually via a steering wheel switch.

At 1680kg, the Nissan GT-R Spec V is 60kg lighter than the standard car.

As part of the weight-saving regime, the car loses its rear seats (there are now just vinyl covers where the seats were) and the boot spoiler, front grille and brake ducts are carbonfibre. The titanium exhaust is lifted from the Nismo Clubsports GT-R, and helps to save another 5.4kg.

Inside, the GT-R Spec V gets a pair of unique, ultra-slim Recaro seats with carbon fibre backs. Carbon fibre inserts also feature on the instrument panel and the storage box sitting between what used to be the two rear seats.

The ultra-stiff suspension set-up uses Bilstein dampers, and the Spec V has Nissan’s first production carbon-ceramic brakes, co-developed with Brembo. Nissan claims that the new brakes allow the Spec V to develop a braking force of up to 2.0g; the standard car musters 1.4g. The new brakes also save 5kg per wheel.

The Spec V rolls on lightweight 20-inch forged alloy wheels, which saves 20kg. Tyres are bespoke high-grip Bridgestone Potenza RE070R run-flats (while Dunlop SP Sports DSSTs are optional).

The GT-R Spec V comes in a range of colours but the by far the most exotic is Ultimate Opal Black, which changes colour depending on the light, and is very similar to a colour used on the previous-generation R34 GT-R.

Nissan has a planned monthly production run of 20-30 units of the GT-R Spec V. In Japan, prices start at around £112,000, almost twice the price of the standard Nissan GT-R.

As to how fast the Spec V is around the Nurburgring, Nissan says that it hasn’t been officially tested yet. The firm will not confirm acceleration times or top speed either.

Peter Nunn

Our Verdict

Nissan GT-R

The Nissan GT-R is not a cheap car, but it’s better value for money than cars that are seemingly as fast

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