Renault's redesigned electric small car will launch by the summer, and will evolve the existing themes of today's model

The exterior styling of the next-generation Renault Zoe has leaked ahead of its official debut.

The electric supermini, which is due to be revealed later this month, appeared on a French automotive facebook fan page, showing a redesigned front end that shares styling elements with the upcoming fifth-generation Clio. The overall profile doesn't appear to have changed dramatically from the original car, which is in line with earlier statements made by Renault's design boss.

According to Laurens van den Acker, the next-generation Zoe will be a “heavy phase two design rather than a new car from the ground up”.

No other aspects were revealed in the leak, including a rumoured interior upgrade.

The second-gen electric supermini will launch in a far more competitive market space than its predecessor, which means the model needs to step up to rivals. Van den Acker said: “Competition is coming hard and fast in 2020 so Zoe will have to fight for its place.”

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Renault Zoe

Bespoke battery-powered supermini aims to advance the cause of electric cars at the mainstream end of the market

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Part of this overhaul will include a revamped interior, which is expected to take inspiration from the new Clio. It will also offer sustainable materials. Van den Acker claims that such features "fit well with our philosophy that EVs should be more ecological.”

The new Zoe is expected to use a bespoke EV platform shared across the Renault-Nissan-Mitsubishi alliance. That's instead of sharing its platform with the current Nissan Leaf, which uses an adapted version of the original 2011 Leaf's platform. 

The bespoke electric platform, which will be used for all forthcoming small to medium-sized EVs, will allow greater battery capacity for a range target of 250 miles under the new, more real-world WLTP testing regime. That's a match for the latest Zoe R110's NEDC range claim, which is claimed to be around 190 miles in the real-world.

However, the new Zoe is unlikely to beat the 292 miles on WLTP that the Hyundai Kona Electric offers. Renault's European boss Jean-Christophe Kugler told Autocar: “The psychological tipping point is 300km. The range has never been a blocker for the Zoe and we think today’s fits people’s needs perfectly.”

The first spyshots to emerge of the new Zoe showed prototypes testing with the usual body camouflage. However, they clearly showed that the car's overall profile won't change dramatically, with detail changes including a front-end more in-line with the upcoming Clio, LED lighting and a curvier rear-end shape. The roof appears to have humps running the length of it, which is likely part of the car's disguise.

Pricing for the new Zoe is a long way off being announced, but it's likely Renault will try to keep at the same level to sustain its popularity as one of the most affordable EVs on the market. Multiple variants with differing power outputs, EV ranges and equipment levels could be offered, allowing Renault to keep at the car's current price point but upsell buyers to pricier variants.

Renault is yet to announced a second electric model, but van Den Acker confirmed its zero-emission plans will focus on dedicated electric models rather than variants of existing cars. “There are two approaches: you make a dedicated vehicle or derivative. We approach it more with dedicated platforms. We have economies of sale in the Alliance. A dedicated platform gives us more freedom especially in the interior."

"The next EVs will be a continuation of the Zoe. I can’t wait to show it.”

No more details have been confirmed, but Renault has previously said it will launch eight EVs by 2022, which includes the next Zoe.

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Comments
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11 October 2018
We love it for it's space, refinement and for our purposes it's range , however the monthly payment for battery lease is ridiculous now that we know most batteries will last 7-10years , please drop the charge Renault , it makes a mockery of cheaper running costs .

11 October 2018

Yea I always thought the leasing part was crazy and will be dropped sometime.

What happens when you sell it, the car gets stolen or you just stop paying it (do they come and take the battery out?)

11 October 2018
xxxx wrote:

Yea I always thought the leasing part was crazy and will be dropped sometime.

What happens when you sell it, the car gets stolen or you just stop paying it (do they come and take the battery out?)

Really good question , even trading it can be an issue as the dealer taking it will have to pay the fee while it sits on the forecourt waiting to be sold . We paid £6k for an immaculate one year old with 6k miles for a reason ! Fully anticipating getting bugger all back in 4 years , however compared to what most folk pay in pcp's in a year that still works out ahead of the curve ! Hoping Renault will just quietly drop the fee .

11 October 2018

Let's be honest, battery leasing was introduced to disguise the high purchase price of EVs - and to reasure nervous buyers that there would no issue with ever having to replace a very expensive battery. But it complicates purchase of a used EV with many advertisers not declaring the additional cost of battery rental.

To my mind the whole car should either be purchased outright, or available to lease. Having bits of the car owned by the customer and another part owned by the manufacturer doesn't make sense. Imagine purchasing a regular car with the engine leased at extra cost!

On the subject of used EVs, I get the distinct impression that values are now on the rise. Perhaps finally drivers are warming to the isea of electric propulsion and demand is finally catching up with supply?   

11 October 2018

Until there is an industry standard along the lines of mpg calculations (i.e. urban, combined, extra urban etc) buyers will continue to have the wool pulled over their eyes. Somewhat stunned when Fifth Gear calculated the new Nissan Leaf only had a range one quarter of the advertised range when travelling at motorway speeds.

11 October 2018
Bill Lyons wrote:

Until there is an industry standard along the lines of mpg calculations (i.e. urban, combined, extra urban etc) buyers will continue to have the wool pulled over their eyes. Somewhat stunned when Fifth Gear calculated the new Nissan Leaf only had a range one quarter of the advertised range when travelling at motorway speeds.

What are you rambling about? There ARE industry standards for measuring electric ranges. For example NEDC and WLTP, which were both mentioned in the article!

 

11 October 2018

If I had bought a Leaf or a Zoe with a 200 mile range and found it could only go 50 or 60 miles on the motorway I would feel I'd been conned. 

11 October 2018

The Fifth Gear calculation you are referring to is from 2010! Electric cars have come a long way since and the battery capacities have nearly doubled. Maybe its time for you to update your facts..

The first generation Leaf you are referring to had a rated range of 73-109 miles (73 miles according to EPA standard and 109 according to NEDC standard). Compared with these figures, the drop in range is not as drastic as you suggest. You can find similar differences in rated mpg and real-life mpg values also from petrol and diesel cars. Even though the new WLTP standard is more realistic, we all know that the rated mpg and electric range values are still too optimistic and have to be taken with a pinch of salt. 

 

11 October 2018
Halcyon wrote:

The Fifth Gear calculation you are referring to is from 2010! Electric cars have come a long way since and the battery capacities have nearly doubled. Maybe its time for you to update your facts..

The first generation Leaf you are referring to had a rated range of 73-109 miles (73 miles according to EPA standard and 109 according to NEDC standard). Compared with these figures, the drop in range is not as drastic as you suggest. You can find similar differences in rated mpg and real-life mpg values also from petrol and diesel cars. Even though the new WLTP standard is more realistic, we all know that the rated mpg and electric range values are still too optimistic and have to be taken with a pinch of salt. 

 

 

Keep trying, sweetheart. They tested the latest Leaf on Fifth Gear last month, shown on Quest. In future don't be too quick to accuse people of ignorance. I am well aware there are industry standards. My post read "industry standard along the lines of..." Take 3 deep breaths next time. 

 

12 October 2018

I have to admit that I made some hasty assumptions about your information source. The first Google result for "Fifth Gear Nissan Leaf 60 mile range" just seemed like a logical source, but I was wrong.  You are also right that it would be informative to have standardized mpg and range measurements for different (constant) driving speeds. I apologize for my misunderstanding.

I also watched the Fifth Gear (s27e02) where they tested the 2018 Nissan Leaf. True, they achieved consumption of 1,7 miles/kWh (=68 mile total range) when they "simulated" highway speed driving. However, their "simulation" consisted of high speed driving in a race track! That's hardly a real-life scenario, especially when it contained stops and hard accelerations and the driver confessed that he doesn't know how to drive slowly.

There are also many other sources for EV highway speed consumptions. For example, youtuber Bjorn Nyland has tested many different EVs in real-life conditions. In one occasion, he tested Nissan Leaf and got 4,57 miles/kWh when driving 50 mph and 3,18 miles/kWh when driving 68-75 mph along the normal highway traffic flow. These figures show how drastically speed affects the consumption (note that the latter figure is significantly better then the one achieved by the Fifth Gear).

 

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