New M3 and M4 will reach UK showrooms from June, priced from £56,175; both models get turbo power and 425bhp
Darren Moss
21 January 2014

UK BMW M3 and M4 pre-orders have already topped 200 cars, say company officials.

The two new M-badged performance models, which both go on sale towards the end of June, traditionally sell well in the UK. Expectations are that UK buyers will account for 10 per cent of all BMW M4 sales.

As a result, BMW UK is targetting annual sales of 1200 M4s and 700 M3s in its first year on sale. Around 5000 units of the M4 are expected to be sold here over its seven-year life cycle.

Both the M3 and M4 are powered by a new turbocharged 3.0-litre six-cylinder engine producing 425bhp. The new engine gets the M3 and M4 to 62mph in 4.3 seconds, when fitted with the standard six-speed manual gearbox. An optional seven-speed DCT drops that time to 4.1 seconds. The top speed of both models is limited to 155mph, but can be raised to 174mph as an option.

Official economy figures say that owners should expect around 32.1mpg on a combined cycle, with CO2 emissions of 204g/km for the manual, and 194g/km for the DCT version.

One of the biggest changes is the move to turbocharge the M3 and M4, putting an end to 26 years of naturally-aspirated BMW M models. UK product manager Matt Collins says the news will create a talking point with fans of the brand: "I can understand why there might be some concern with moving to a new engine configuration, but we chose the configuration that best fits the vehicle. For these cars the turbo generates the right performance and the right kind of torque. It adds up to the right package.

"The turbocharging technology now in these cars really is phenomenal. It's very lightweight, and the smaller engine displacement means a smaller engine overall which in itself saves more weight. There are benefits here that you can't necessarily get from a naturally-aspirated engine."

The manufacturer says it has saved around 80kg of weight from both models by using aluminium and carbonfibre in their construction. An aluminium bonnet alone saves 8kg, while a lightweight battery shaves off another 12.8kg.

BMW is pitching the M4 against the likes of the Mercedes-Benz C63 AMG and the Audi RS5.

The UK is currently the second-largest market for M-badged models.

Production of the M3 and M4 is due to get underway in March, with prices starting at £56,175 for the M3 and £56,635 for the M4.

Our Verdict

BMW M4

New name, new engine and two turbos and even a much needed facelift, the main question lingers - can the BMW M4 grab the initiative off of the Mercedes-AMG C 63 Coupé

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Comments
2

22 January 2014
"the turbo generates the right performance and the right kind of torque. It adds up to the right package" - really? For years BMW M Division was a prime advocate of N/A engines, I seem to remember that when the E92 M3 V8 was launched the M Division engineers were adamant that N/A engines were here to stay and that turbocharging engines like AMG and Audi RS was merely an "expedient" solution to performance. Sounds like expediency is now pushing the M Division into the business of turbocharging. Perhaps they should just admit the truth - EU emissions regulations mean BMW cannot offer performance without turbocharging so the buyers will just have to accept that M cars are really just boosted 335s/435s/550s and 650s.

25 January 2014
Indeed, turbocharging seems to be the most "expedient" when it comes to getting emissions down and horsepower up, especially if you're caught up in a crazed power war for the highest output.

When I saw the figures for the M3/M4 and how BMW achieved them I immediately thought 'how embarrassing'. Does not Alpina advocate and use the very same twin IHI turbos on their B3 ? I think they just might......There I was thinking that MPower was the engineering pinnacle for BMW.....

So, yes, you are quite right SPQR: everyone's discovered the ease by which horsepower is availed through turbocharging.

They will, of course, also discover ( if they live anywhere within the M25) that it is far better to pootle around at 40mph with a multi-cylinder N/A engine and "enjoy the drive" than it is to wring the neck of a turbo engine and head straight to jail and a 2 year ban. I wager that my '05 Alpina Z4 3.4 six sounds better on tickover than an F30 M4 at full tilt. Alack and alas......

BertoniBertone

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