Maddest 911 road car is expected in the coming months; it's been spotted testing at the Nürburgring with new intakes

The next Porsche 911 GT2 RS will be the most powerful and extreme road going 911 produced yet when it arrives in the coming months.

Based on the second-generation 911 chassis and gaining hardware from the GT3 RS, the rear-wheel drive GT2 RS will get rear-axle steering with Porsche Torque Vectoring, as well as a fully variable locking rear differential.

Power will come from a turbocharged flat-six engine that's related to 911 Turbo S's unit but has been ramped up to produce close to 700bhp.

This will enable scintillating straight line performance. Expect 62mph to come in little more than 2.5sec and top speed to be over 205mph, dwarfing the numbers of the GT3 RS and even the four-wheel drive Turbo S.

It will also produce more downforce from its track-spec bodywork than any other 911 on sale, with a fixed rear wing, larger front intakes and GT3 RS-mimicking arch vents.

The bonnet intakes on the photographed test car look far from production-ready, but they do suggest there will be vents here, and the same can be said for the winglets on the nose - they are unlikely to make production, but suggest the final car's bumper will generate additional downforce.

Porsche refrained from commenting on the photographed development car, but the brand's high performance boss, Andreas Preuninger, confirmed that a GT2 RS was on its way last year. The recent sightings of a test mule at the Nürburgring suggest the model is just months away from launch.

The new 911 GT2 will be the first to wear the moniker since the 997-series-based model that went on sale seven years ago. It offered 611bhp from its twin-turbo flat six engine in a package weighing just 1370kg. It is widely regarded as the most extreme 911 to have gone on general sale.

Our Verdict

Porsche 911 GT3 RS

Hardcore 493bhp GT3 RS represents a new level for the Porsche 911 - faint hearts need not apply

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Comments
17

18 August 2016
The question not mentioned or answered is whether it will finally get up with the 21st century and its Turbo and Turbo S brothers/sisters and have the PDK,rather than a slower,dirtier and less economical manual shift!

Madmac

18 August 2016
PDK = less fun, for me and many others. Couldn't care less that PDK is "21st century." Autonomous cars will be even more 21st century, but I won't want one of those either. Some will want PDK, some will want a true manual -- give the buyer the choice of gearbox.

13 April 2017
Speedraser wrote:

PDK = less fun, for me and many others. Couldn't care less that PDK is "21st century." Autonomous cars will be even more 21st century, but I won't want one of those either. Some will want PDK, some will want a true manual -- give the buyer the choice of gearbox.

Could you possibly explain the attraction of having to change gear manually? It's not as if there's any satisfying skill to master, these days, what with synchromesh and idiot-proof clutches. Also, most of the time one isn't changing gear anyway, it's just a damn nuisance for a short time until the car actually gets going. Do you not enjoy the 90% of the time when you're not having to change gear?

If the characteristics of an internal combustion engine were similar to those of an electric motor and max torque was produced from zero revs I find it hard to believe that anyone would have said: 'this is great but wouldn't it be better if we could interupt this seamless acceleration by periodically stamping on a pedal and waggling a lever'?

18 August 2016
700 bhp... Ridiculous... A car for babies...

19 August 2016
they wouldn't be able to reach the pedals? Not and see out anyway. Sounds very dangerous to me. Irresponsible even.

18 August 2016
Go wash your mouth with soap, granpa

No manual - no fun

13 April 2017
Yes,yes I do!,it won't have a seven figure on the Road price,it will a manageable size on the Road,servicing will not be the price of a full spec Ford Fiesta,and of course it is an everyday super car!.

Peter Cavellini.

13 April 2017
This much money and this much Subaru-at-Halfords upside-down wing for people to wonder if you've lost your marbles. McLaren is making Porsche look as devoid of imagination as some Porsche customers.

13 April 2017
manages to get 90 seconds worth a year driving this thing to it's full capabilities on Britain's road network then they'll have done well. If they manage to survive the full 12 months with their licence intact that is.

15 April 2017
Cobnapint wrote:

manages to get 90 seconds worth a year driving this thing to it's full capabilities on Britain's road network then they'll have done well. If they manage to survive the full 12 months with their licence intact that is.

The same can be said about almost any car. Get in an 85bhp supermini and drive it everywhere at eight-tenths of flat out and you'd be overtaking over ninety per cent of everyone else on the road. Until, as you say, the licence is removed.

I don't need to put my name here, it's on the left

 

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