The upcoming Urus SUV is the primary candidate to be Lamborghini's first hybrid model, although the business case has yet to be signed off
Matt Burt
18 December 2015

The forthcoming Lamborghini Urus SUV is a better candidate to be the company's first plug-in hybrid than the Huracán and Aventador super-sports cars, company chiefs have revealed.

Although Lamborghini top brass haven’t yet signed off the business case for a plug-in hybrid version of the Urus, which will be offered first as a non-hybrid twin-turbo petrol V8 in 2018, it is still a strong possibility.

It is more challenging to install a hybrid powertrain into a sports car, where the extra weight has a greater impact.

Maurizio Reggiani, Lamborghini’s research and development boss, said: “When you add a 200kg battery to a super-sports car, you immediately change the weight distribution of the car. You destroy the DNA of the car.

“In the Urus there will be a bigger luggage compartment, so you have the space where you can install batteries in a position that is good in principal for an SUV, and you don’t need a complete redevelopment or repackaging of the car.”

To achieve a sports car with CO2 emissions below 100g/km, Reggiani said, means installing 200kg of batteries and then “spending a quantity of money to save this weight again – you must use titanium, magnesium and carbonfibre in every part of the car”.

Lamborghini’s president and chief executive Stephan Winkelmann explained that a hybrid sports car was harder to for the company to justify financially. “If you really want to have a hybrid car with, for example, an electric range of 50km, but you want to also maintain a good power-to-weight, you are raising the bar to a million-pound car," he said.

“It is something that we cannot allow without then charging it back to the customers, and this is not a market that is so large it can last for seven or eight years. It will be dead after a couple of years.”

Winkelmann wouldn’t be drawn on when a decision whether to put a hybrid Urus into production would be made. “The V8 is most important to us at the moment but it was also important to plan the packaging of the car to make it easy to install a hybrid system without dramatic modification in the future,” he said.

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9

18 December 2015
VW Big Wig wrote:

It will be dead after a couple of years

So there it is. Straight from the horse's mouth. Hybrids are evidently a passing fad. An *extremely* senior VW man thinks the hybrid sportscar market has no future. He clearly does not forsee the step-change improvements in batteries which could negate the compromises inherent in these vehicles. Moreover, as future head of Quattro GmbH his view counts, big time. And if hybrids don't work as high-cost sportscars then there is no way they would ever work in the mass-market, with its wafer-thin margins. Maybe he's betting on fuel cells, long-term. Or more likely, he recognises the lasting impact of the Shale Revolution and that cheap oil could be here for some considerable time. In any case, Lambo fans should celebrate.

Myk

18 December 2015
Norma Smellons wrote:
VW Big Wig wrote:

It will be dead after a couple of years

So there it is. Straight from the horse's mouth. Hybrids are evidently a passing fad..

I don't think that's what he was saying. In context he's talking about having to make the car a million pounds to recoup the costs, and he's saying the market for that sort of car only lasts a short time (due to fashion and technology advances), as we know. Hence why these sorts of cars - LaFerrari, 918, P1 - are limited run rather than full production. I doubt Lamborghini can justify the expense of developing a limited production car with all-new technology, when they have full production cars that are more pressing.
Until battery charging technology advances it would appear the hybrid is far from dead, and the more sensible route for ordinary production cars.

18 December 2015
Myk wrote:
Norma Smellons wrote:
VW Big Wig wrote:

It will be dead after a couple of years

So there it is. Straight from the horse's mouth. Hybrids are evidently a passing fad..

I don't think that's what he was saying. In context he's talking about having to make the car a million pounds to recoup the costs, and he's saying the market for that sort of car only lasts a short time (due to fashion and technology advances), as we know. Hence why these sorts of cars - LaFerrari, 918, P1 - are limited run rather than full production. I doubt Lamborghini can justify the expense of developing a limited production car with all-new technology, when they have full production cars that are more pressing.
Until battery charging technology advances it would appear the hybrid is far from dead, and the more sensible route for ordinary production cars.

You would think that's what he is saying, well hopefully anyway! It's a bit different trying to add hybrid technology to a performance car that is already going to have a large heavy engine in it whilst giving it worthwhile performance gain than it is trying to add it to one with a very small light engine where you aren't necessarily trying to add a whole heap more power like nearly every real world hybrid.

18 December 2015
Norma Smellons wrote:
VW Big Wig wrote:

It will be dead after a couple of years

So there it is. Straight from the horse's mouth. Hybrids are evidently a passing fad. An *extremely* senior VW man thinks the hybrid sportscar market has no future. He clearly does not forsee the step-change improvements in batteries which could negate the compromises inherent in these vehicles. Moreover, as future head of Quattro GmbH his view counts, big time. And if hybrids don't work as high-cost sportscars then there is no way they would ever work in the mass-market, with its wafer-thin margins. Maybe he's betting on fuel cells, long-term. Or more likely, he recognises the lasting impact of the Shale Revolution and that cheap oil could be here for some considerable time. In any case, Lambo fans should celebrate.

Can't wait to hear XXXX's blindly biased reply to your post!! I would expect it to have either spelling mistakes, misquotes or a general lack of understanding. Probably all three to be honest, just look at his pathetic efforts on the Hyundai IX35 review for example!!

18 December 2015
You're a sad person with a personality problem, just because I highlighted the problems with the Toyota Mira and ix35 Hydrogen cars and why the plug-in will succeed you can’t sleep at night and mention me in your posts. Well I think you should move on and realise people have different opinions to yourself. But it's nice to know you're thinking of me.

 

Hydrogen cars just went POP

18 December 2015
xxxx wrote:

You're a sad person with a personality problem, just because I highlighted the problems with the Toyota Mira and ix35 Hydrogen cars and why the plug-in will succeed you can’t sleep at night and mention me in your posts. Well I think you should move on and realise people have different opinions to yourself. But it's nice to know you're thinking of me.

Where did you disappear to on the Hyundai review XXXX? You couldn't really show your face again after the battering you got could you XXXX!!?? Why would I want to move on from showing up your general stupidity XXXX when it gives me great pleasure to do so??

18 December 2015
The SUV is flavour of the moment, so is likely to offer a much better business case with much less effort, and in terms of sales volumes, will help with meeting group emissions targets more easily, perhaps? Strangely enough, BMW seem to have made the i8 appealing (1575kg), without it costing a million. Am I missing something?

18 December 2015
Adrian987 wrote:

The SUV is flavour of the moment, so is likely to offer a much better business case with much less effort, and in terms of sales volumes, will help with meeting group emissions targets more easily, perhaps? Strangely enough, BMW seem to have made the i8 appealing (1575kg), without it costing a million. Am I missing something?

Yeah I didn't really get the million pound comment either, maybe it's been misinterpreted slighty. I'm sure that the reason Porsche, Ferrari and Mclaren are able to charge so much for their "Hypercars" now is merely because the market can comfortably sustain cars in that price range where it possibly couldn't 10 years ago, the Veyron appears to have changed the market completely. I mean if people are willing to pay well over a million for the last generation Ferrari Hypercar they sure as well will pay the same for the latest, greatest model as well!

18 December 2015
Lamborghini are always behind the curve. Their comments about hybrid are a bit embarrassing given that numerous rivals have already overcome these issues and put such cars into production. McLaren has overtaken them. It seems Porsche can command a higher price for their flagship than Lamborghini can - and Porsche will also sell you a sports car for less than £40k. Lamborghini can't even get their SUV out ahead of rivals, despite history in this sector and the tech of VAG behind them.

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