Currently reading: Carbonfibre-bodied Kamm is 699kg Porsche 912
Budapest-based manufacturer upgrades its flagship, including more engine power and improved aero

Hungarian tuner and restomodder Kamm has upgraded its 912c sports car with a more powerful, super-lightweight, carbonfibre-bodied edition.

The car, which is based on the 1965 Porsche 912, is made completely out of carbonfibre and tipped to weigh in at just 699kg when fully homologated for the road. 

This represents a 300kg cut from the 1965 car (originally produced as a budget Porsche 911) and a weight saving of 51kg over the original Kamm 912c, which is only partly built from carbonfibre and will remain on sale alongside this new version.

Kamm founder Miklós Kázmér said: “I'm a perfectionist and continuously seek innovative new ways to improve the 912c. Our new carbonfibre body is a great example of that, with perfect fit, incredible strength and further weight saving.

"In addition, the 2024 912c will offer a range of enhancements to further enhance driving pleasure and give an even more rewarding ownership experience."

Underneath, the fully carbonfibre 912c gains a series of performance changes that include a power boost to the air-cooled 2.0-litre four-cylinder engine, improved aerodynamics to help high-speed stability and reduced wind noise.

In the standard car, this engine produces 187bhp, has a 0-62mph time of 6.0sec and a top speed of 140mph. With such a significant weight saving, these figures are likely to be further improved upon.

Elsewhere, it remains close to the original 912c in its near-50:50 weight distribution, five-speed 'dogleg' gearbox, ZF limited-slip differential, hydraulic handbrake and multi-adjustable dampers.

Inside, it gets upgraded air conditioning and an improved stereo system that makes it compatible with modern smartphones. This comes with bespoke carbonfibre seats, lightweight carpeting and carbonfibre interior trim.

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Budapest-based Kamm builds each car bespoke to a customer's specification with an "unlimited" range of options that cover the seats, wheels trim finishes and exterior liveries.

In terms of finish, customers can choose between a fully painted car or one whose carbonfibre panelling is left exposed.

Customers will pay €400,000 (£345,560) for the fully carbonfibre 912c, including the cost of a donor 912. If a customer chooses to donate their own 912, the price drops by €40,000 (£34,556).

Kamm said that its order quota for the ultra-lightweight restomod has almost been filled already.

Jonathan Bryce

Jonathan Bryce
Title: Editorial Assistant

Jonathan is an editorial assistant working with Autocar. He has held this position since March 2024, having previously studied at the University of Glasgow before moving to London to become an editorial apprentice and pursue a career in motoring journalism. 

His role at work involves writing news stories, travelling to launch events and interviewing some of the industry's most influential executives, rewriting used car reviews and used car advice articles, updating and uploading articles for the Autocar website and making sure they are optimised for search engines, and regularly appearing on Autocar's social media channels including Instagram, TikTok, and YouTube.

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Mikey C 19 December 2023

Why would you spend such a large sum on modernising a 60s Porsche, instead of just appreciating it for what it is, and buying a newer one for everyday use?

Flyer345 19 December 2023

It looks quite sinister in black carbon, quite unlike the original. And I don't get this car body modification craze, why not just 3D print a retro Elfer-droid in carbon and magnesium and leave the old machines alone for people that appreciate such stuff.

TStag 19 December 2023

At what point does a car become a sort of pseudo kit car? What if they went further and made the car electric as well? Hard to say, but there is something for originality