Company boss says hybrids and other fuel-efficient vehicles are focus
27 May 2010

Honda's chief executive Takanobu Ito has conceded the car industry still needs a breakthrough in battery technology in order to make electric cars viable.

As a result, he said the company was looking to develop electric car batteries in China to tap the country's technology and vast resources. The Chinese government is currently providing car makers with extensive grants to develop electric vehicles, as it bids to break its reliance on oil, which it has to import.

"If there is a suitable chance, we hope to work with China to (develop) batteries," said Ito . "There needs to be a major breakthrough in battery technology."

Ito also predicted that it will take ten-20 years before battery-run electric cars became mainstream, saying he would prefer to focus Honda's investment on hybrids and other fuel-efficient vehicles in the meantime.

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28

27 May 2010

batteries will only be viable when there is no oil left/when america has lost it from spilling it in the ocean.

27 May 2010

Finally, a dose of common sense. Electric cars need electricity, and at the moment the vast majority of that comes from burning fossil fuels, so rather than reducing CO2, it might actually increase it. On top of that, unlike petrol/diesel, the car always has to carry around the full weight of the battery pack.

More efficient engines are the way to go, until someone cracks hydrogen.

27 May 2010

[quote beachland2] batteries will only be viable when there is no oil left/when america has lost it from spilling it in the ocean.[/quote]

Yes because we all know that British Petroleum is a bastion of American Business!


27 May 2010

I do not understand Honda's reluctance on sticking to gasoline engines. they do not have any diesel engine except 2.2 CTDi, which is insignificant for some countries where tax is an issue out of engine displacement.

They concentrate on hydrogen powered and hybrid engines instead while most others choose electric way. I wonder who would fall right. If the biggest manufacturers like GM/Opel, VW, Renault-Nissan, show signs of turning their face to electricity, then one might easily say the future will be shaped electric. Then Honda might loose that future.

Take care Honda. Do not get late!...

27 May 2010

consumers of this world, watch this:

Honda future, not viable

(Daihatsu, Subaru, Scion, Lexus tied to Toyota)

(Nissan tied to Renault)

(Suzuki tied to Volkswagen)

(Mazda, bought by... Chinese or maybe lost...)

(Honda, lost, lost... because they aim pull out Toyota from the top and become the biggest Japanese carmaker...)

whatch out Honda!

27 May 2010

[quote Mr E Nigma]

Yes because we all know that British Petroleum is a bastion of American Business!

[/quote]

America is responsible for anything going on in American territory, they were the final authority on allowing the spill to happen. The failure was down to American and American owned rigs/infrastructure also i believe. BP was only leasing it.

If you think BP was at fault its the same as saying all those Americans who died driving Toyotas were at fault, not the company that built them.

Actually that analogy loses my own argument as i believe the drivers were the ones responsible. But anyway under american law/morality it is not BP who bears any wrong doing, it's the American companies or state, BP should be taking them to court for loss of earnings from an oil well it paid to have rights to drill. America owes BP billions of $ now.

27 May 2010

Honda have said it, what we've all said, with perfect CLARITY! (had to get it on somewhere!).

Peter Cavellini.

27 May 2010

[quote beachland2] BP was only leasing it.[/quote]

If US law is anything like UK law then BP would have had at least an equal duty of care.

27 May 2010

The only extraordinary thing in this whole business is why Honda is practically alone is stating the bleeding obvious on EVs while governments (the UK one especially) continue to be suckered into throwing our money away on nonsensical plug-in car projects, conned by strategic leaks about new battery tech being 'just around the corner' – which it so plainly isn't. The level of thinking on this is criminally low.

27 May 2010

[quote tonym911]The only extraordinary thing in this whole business is why Honda is practically alone is stating the bleeding obvious on EVs while governments (the UK one especially) continue to be suckered into throwing our money away on nonsensical plug-in car projects, conned by strategic leaks about new battery tech being 'just around the corner' – which it so plainly isn't. The level of thinking on this is criminally low.[/quote]

I agree with all that but the problem is also that hydrogen fuel cell power isn't as viable in the short term as Honda would have you believe because the production of hydrogen is so expensive, not to mention the storage and safety issues.

The production of hydrogen is also very power intensive, power which is supposed to come from where exactly?

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