The 'One Ford' policy is said to have "peaked"; new models are to be more tailored to the region they will be sold in
Richard Bremner Autocar
31 October 2016

The ‘One Ford’ policy, under which the same basic models are sold in all regions around the world, “has peaked”, according to the company’s global design chief, Moray Callum.

Speaking to Autocar, he said the approach isn’t being abandoned, but new models will be “more tailored to each region”. Of the One Ford policy, introduced by previous Ford boss Alan Mulally, Callum said: “It was the right approach at the time.”

One Ford prompted the development of the Mustang as a global model, the launch of the Fiesta in the US and the arrival of the Brazilian Ecosport crossover in Europe, as well as the disposal of the Aston Martin, Jaguar, Land Rover, Volvo and part-owned Mazda brands from Ford’s portfolio. The One Ford strategy was also partly responsible for returning Ford to financial health following the 2008 financial crisis.

Callum said the next Focus will diverge a little from the original philosophy. “It’s an entry-level model in the US, but not in Europe,” he said. “They will be visually similar but there will be less content for the US model.”

As well as a reduced level of standard equipment, the US Focus could feature less sophisticated suspension, given that the need for strong driving dynamics is less vital in this market and at this price point.

Callum also talked about Ford design. He described the design language as “post-kinetic”, but said it was still being used. “For Ford, it means cars that are fun to drive and great to look at,” he added. “We won’t change it dramatically. It will just evolve.” What it evolves into probably won’t have a label. “I’m not into names,” he said.

Spy pictures of the imminent next Fiesta have revealed a car that appears to have evolved quite modestly. However, Callum said: “There will be more of a step change in style after the Fiesta.”

Of the Vignale sub-brand, Callum said: “There will be no stand-alone model for the foreseeable future.” But he added: “New models are being designed with Vignale requirements in mind, so they will be better differentiated.” That includes the next Fiesta, which will have a Vignale edition from launch. 

Our Verdict

Ford Fiesta
Fiestas sold in Europe are ostensibly the same as those sold in America and Asia

The seventh-generation Ford Fiesta is the UK's best selling car, helped by frugal engines, handling verve and a big car feel

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Comments
16

31 October 2016
No, this way. No, tha-. No, hang on. Where did you say we wanted to go?

31 October 2016
New management come in ,all the stuff previous management implemented is ditched , that way new management can justify itself . Corporate amnesia is the term. We definitely live in a more globalised world compared to even ten years ago . Seems an odd decision. I realise Mulalally wasn't a car guy but he certainly saved Ford , he clearly saw that Ford were incapable of developing PAG (ie Jag, Volvo etc) and sensibly ditched them . Sometimes it takes a non car guy to run a business well !

31 October 2016
Sundym wrote:

New management come in ,all the stuff previous management implemented is ditched , that way new management can justify itself . Corporate amnesia is the term. We definitely live in a more globalised world compared to even ten years ago . Seems an odd decision. I realise Mulalally wasn't a car guy but he certainly saved Ford , he clearly saw that Ford were incapable of developing PAG (ie Jag, Volvo etc) and sensibly ditched them . Sometimes it takes a non car guy to run a business well !

Same in any large business.

I used to work for a software company that wrote tailored software for a large telecoms company.

As we would be ready to deliver their latest project, their management would change, and to stamp their authority they would cancel the project and instigate a new one.

It kept us in work, but the sales guys compared it to the old Channel 4 logo idents - all the bits are moving like they're coming together - and they're gone again...

31 October 2016
or in the real world "has failed". I used to like Fords but every incarnation of every car gets slightly worse.

 

Hydrogen cars just went POP

31 October 2016
xxxx wrote:

or in the real world "has failed". I used to like Fords but every incarnation of every car gets slightly worse.

Having owned an early 90s Ford I avoid them like the plague, however the current Mondeo and Mustang are good looking cars, and I heard that quality is much improved over the last 25 years.

Ford have tried for years to have a 'one world' philosophy, the mk3 Escort was intended as such, however the US model ended up baring a resemblance but not sharing many - if any - parts.

The Mondeo (Monde = world...) was sold in the US as Contour, but was too small for US tastes.

It wasn't until the Focus, sold as a compact car, that a world car truly emerged. Old US tastes for big wafty saloon cars have changed, now more aligned with European tastes for small SUVs, and the Mondeo is now big enough to be sold as a mid size (Fusion).

31 October 2016
xxxx wrote:

or in the real world "has failed". I used to like Fords but every incarnation of every car gets slightly worse.

Really, so you think the current Fiesta is worse than the last one? I suspect 99% of the motoring press and customers will disagree with you, the same goes for the Focus (the RS is one on the best and most fun performance cars on sale at any price), the Mondeo is only slated in the press because it its as much fun to drive as the last one, but its far better built, equipped and comfortable, all Ford have done is soften it a bit to make it ride better, Audi have done the same with the new A4 (but thats ok they are a premium marque). The S-Max is quite possibly the best 7 seat MPV on sale in the UK, and if you compare the prices of the Fiesta, Focus and Mondeo with similar offerings from other manufacturers they usually are cheaper to buy, run and just as, if not more reliable.

31 October 2016
Citytiger wrote:
xxxx wrote:

or in the real world "has failed". I used to like Fords but every incarnation of every car gets slightly worse.

Really, so you think the current Fiesta is worse than the last one? I suspect 99% of the motoring press and customers will disagree with you, the same goes for the Focus (the RS is one on the best and most fun performance cars on sale at any price), the Mondeo is only slated in the press because it its as much fun to drive as the last one, but its far better built, equipped and comfortable, all Ford have done is soften it a bit to make it ride better, Audi have done the same with the new A4 (but thats ok they are a premium marque). The S-Max is quite possibly the best 7 seat MPV on sale in the UK, and if you compare the prices of the Fiesta, Focus and Mondeo with similar offerings from other manufacturers they usually are cheaper to buy, run and just as, if not more reliable.

Nope about the Fiesta, but since the World car policy(remember what this story is about) has come into force (post the latest fiesta was designed pre 2008). The Mondeo has got worse (as has it's sales in Europe)and the Focus MK3 got less has respect because it was less of a drivers car.
As to 'Fiesta, Focus and Mondeo being CHEAPER to BUY against similar offerings' you're joking. The Fiesta is way more than the latest Kia, the Focus is only a little bit less than the Golf and A3 (which are better), the Kuga not to different from the Q3 and more than the SEAT ATECA.
Oh and the RS500 is great but it's just a niche model.

 

Hydrogen cars just went POP

31 October 2016
autocar wrote:

One Ford prompted ...and the arrival of the Brazilian Ecosport crossover in Europe, as well as the disposal of the Aston Martin, Jaguar, Land Rover, Volvo and part-owned Mazda brands from Ford’s portfolio.

With the EcoSport being as popular as breaking wind in a spacesuit and Jag, Land Rover, Volvo and Mazda seemingly going from strength to strength post Frexit, it doesn't make good reading for the oval badge.

Never mind, I'm sure Vignale will be a success story...

31 October 2016
scotty5 wrote:
autocar wrote:

One Ford prompted ...and the arrival of the Brazilian Ecosport crossover in Europe, as well as the disposal of the Aston Martin, Jaguar, Land Rover, Volvo and part-owned Mazda brands from Ford’s portfolio.

With the EcoSport being as popular as breaking wind in a spacesuit and Jag, Land Rover, Volvo and Mazda seemingly going from strength to strength post Frexit, it doesn't make good reading for the oval badge.

Never mind, I'm sure Vignale will be a success story...

I'm not sure the reality is so bleak for Ford. The Focus led global sales for a year or two, the F150 dominates the truck segment in the States, the Fiesta still performs well in the UK despite its age, Ford's performance vehicles (Mustang and Focus RS) have been a huge success and the Ranger is a star down under.


31 October 2016
Tuatara wrote:
scotty5 wrote:
autocar wrote:

One Ford prompted ...and the arrival of the Brazilian Ecosport crossover in Europe, as well as the disposal of the Aston Martin, Jaguar, Land Rover, Volvo and part-owned Mazda brands from Ford’s portfolio.

With the EcoSport being as popular as breaking wind in a spacesuit and Jag, Land Rover, Volvo and Mazda seemingly going from strength to strength post Frexit, it doesn't make good reading for the oval badge.

Never mind, I'm sure Vignale will be a success story...

I'm not sure the reality is so bleak for Ford. The Focus led global sales for a year or two, the F150 dominates the truck segment in the States, the Fiesta still performs well in the UK despite its age, Ford's performance vehicles (Mustang and Focus RS) have been a huge success and the Ranger is a star down under.

True the Fiesta, great car, has been a big success. And Maybe the Focus was leading Global Sales for a year (not sure what this means). But for the Focus in Europe now things aren’t quite so rosy, in the first 6 months of this year it’s been outsold by the Astra(some people will be sick at the thought), Octavia, A3 and the Golf sells twice as many. Although in the US which I THINK is a smaller market for this size car it’s doing better comparatively although a long way behind the Civic.

 

Hydrogen cars just went POP

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