New 911 gets direct injection for lower CO2 emissions and more power
6 June 2008

These are the first official pics of the new Porsche 911. The changes to the bodywork are slight, but Porsche has made big changes under the skin of its facelifted 911, including new engines with direct injection for the first time, and a double-clutch transmission. The addition of direct injection cuts the C02 emissions of the Carrera 3.6 to 225g/km, making it the only other Porsche model alongside the 2.7-litre Boxster and Cayman that falls into band F for road tax. Despite this, power is increased by 20bhp to 345bhp; the 3.8-litre unit in the Carrera S now has 385bhp, up by 30bhp. Torque has also increased, by 14lb ft in the Carrera (to 287lb ft) and by 15lb ft in the S, to 310lb ft. The new seven-speed, double-clutch transmission, called PDK (for Porsche Doppelkupplungsgetriebe), cuts the 242g/km CO2 output of the manual S to 240g/km. The unit weighs 10kg less than a Tiptronic gearbox.It also cuts acceleration times by 0.2sec; the Carrera now hits 60mph in 4.7sec, the S in 4.5sec. The optional Sports Chrono Package Plus (which includes launch control) cuts the 0-62mph time by a further 0.2sec.The mildly restyled body features new air intakes and new LED driving lights, and the rear lights now use LEDs. New 18 and 19-inch wheels are available, and the rear end features new tailpipes and an altered lower valance. Inside the changes are minimal; the touch screen is now slightly larger, and there’s the option of ventilated seats. Porsche is increasing the price of the 911 to coincide with the new model. The 3.6 Carrera now starts at £63,070, with the 3.8 Carrera 4S costing £77,650. The Turbo and GT models will get the facelift early next year.

Dan Stevens

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Comments
9

6 June 2008

beautiful, stunning, evolution baeauty. Where other sports car companies have to design their cars in relation to market requirements. The 911 iwas, is and will always be the yardstick for others to follow. Brilliant. I can't wait to pick mine up in less than 3 months now....and counting.

6 June 2008

Lucky, lucky you!. I do hope you can switch off the daytime running lighs though.

6 June 2008

Here in Sweden they are obbligatory....I d on't know the stats on how many accidents they prevent. [quote SpecB]I do hope you can switch off the daytime running lighs though.[/quote]

6 June 2008

Is this new version still called 997, considering the 997 was a heavily facelifted version of the 996 which was the 1st version of what is currently the 2nd gen 911? Either the way, it the new model looks superb!

Only mild disappointment for me is that the Carrera S hasn't hit the magic 400 Bhp mark to challenge the lowered powered version of its rivals, namely R8 and Vantage. I still reckon the superior chassis of the 911 would make it quicker around most tracks though, even with less power!

6 June 2008

Didn't realise you were in Sweden - that's fair enough if all cars have to have them. In the UK we are not used to them and to have a car with super bright LED's drive up behind you is distracting (certainly for me in any case.)

6 June 2008

It has taken me nearly 30 years to really appreciate the 911, can't explain why but now I love it. Would I buy one if I was in a position to do so?.......

No, while appreciate what it stands for and the development that has gone into making it a worthy handling car in the modern age, I would go for something like an Aston.

Got to hand it to Porsche though for not giving up on the rear engined theme, although they did give up on the air cooled engine.

7 June 2008

[quote Jon Hardcastle] I would go for something like an Aston.[/quote]

I can totally appreciate this decision Jon. I think if you take Ferrari and Lambo out of the bag....used as Summer cars or boulevard cars here. Then Aston and Porsche today are the two cars in real world terms (under 100k) fighting it out for dominance. I don't think there is really a fight at all. Aston stands for one precise set of values, Porsche another. Above anything else these two marques must always be supported. I have had three Porsches in my lucky life. But this time I was dancing with the idea of the baby Aston. But lack of dealership back-up here in Sweden made me chose Porsche once more. The baby can fit in the back :-) When you get your Aston, if you have not already, let's meet somewhere to chat about cars. Porsche drivers (the ones I have met and excluding myself totally in this) and Aston ones I have met (3) know more about cars than any others. I would also put loyal Skoda drivers in this group (who started with the rear engine models) have remarkable knowledge. E.G. Skoda engines furnished the German Panzer and Tiger tanks.

8 June 2008

[quote andrew1965]I can totally appreciate this decision Jon. I think if you take Ferrari and Lambo out of the bag....used as Summer cars or boulevard cars here. Then Aston and Porsche today are the two cars in real world terms (under 100k) fighting it out for dominance. I don't think there is really a fight at all. Aston stands for one precise set of values, Porsche another. Above anything else these two marques must always be supported. I have had three Porsches in my lucky life. But this time I was dancing with the idea of the baby Aston. But lack of dealership back-up here in Sweden made me chose Porsche once more. The baby can fit in the back :-) When you get your Aston, if you have not already, let's meet somewhere to chat about cars. Porsche drivers (the ones I have met and excluding myself totally in this) and Aston ones I have met (3) know more about cars than any others. I would also put loyal Skoda drivers in this group (who started with the rear engine models) have remarkable knowledge. E.G. Skoda engines furnished the German Panzer and Tiger tanks. [/quote]

Thanks Andrew, but James Mays chances of getting his job back at Autocar are better than me being able to afford an Aston/Porsche.

I like what you say though as I am also a Skoda convert. The rear engined Estelle was a very successful rally car.

But in truth my heart really lies with Alfa Romeo and Maserati. And I know having said what I have about engineering integrity etc. I know Alfa's and Maseratis have not alway echoed this.

8 June 2008

[quote andrew1965]E.G. Skoda engines furnished the German Panzer and Tiger tanks. [/quote]

Can you explain more about Skoda engines in Panzer and Tiger tanks? I understood Tiger I and II had Maybach engines. Maybach Motorenbau GmbH of Berlin.

Are you confusing Tigers' 700hp Maybach V12 HL 230 engine with the Skoda 120 hp six cylinder engine in the captured Czech LT-35 light tank?

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