...but only 10 per cent of California buyers are expected to take up the option
25 March 2010

Ferrari will launch a manual version of the California this summer.

Ferrari first confirmed that the California would be available with a manual gearbox at the folding hard-top’s launch in 2008. Reports claim the firm is only expecting a 10 per cent take up of this option compared with its F1-style DCT transmission.

Autocar's Ferrari California road test

Official performance and economy figures haven’t been confirmed, but a leaked document claims the manual California can do a 0-62mph in 4.2sec – 0.3secs slower than the DCT. Like the DCT-equipped California, the manual version is capable of a top speed of 193mph.

Fuel consumption also takes a hit with the manual; the DCT’s fuel consumption figure of 21.6mpg is 11 per cent better than the manual’s.

The forthcoming 458 Italia will be the first Ferrari in regular series production not to come with a manual option at all; it will be available with a DCT gearbox only.

The manual Ferrari California will soon be available to order in mainland Europe; UK sales will begin shortly after.

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Comments
10

25 March 2010

Although I would have thought this model was ideal for auto only, obviously some customers don't - can't think of another reason to offer a manual so quickly after release.

25 March 2010

Someone should get their facts right!!! There have been plenty Ferraris without a manual option in the past! The first one was the 2002 Enzo hypercar and then the 360 Challenge Stradale, 430 Scuderia and 458 Italia followed...

25 March 2010

There should always be a Ferrari manual option. It's part of the experience/history is it not???? For anyone who's ever had the pleasure of trying a manual Ferrari you'll know what I mean (and no I don't own one)

25 March 2010

I think this matter is far more important than Autocar makes it.

I am certain that there is a close corralation between the 10% of customers Ferrari say are chosing a manual gearbox and the people who are actually buying a Ferrari for the right reasons.

The pleasure of driving any car is a sensory one. As a driver, a beautiful gear change should be one of the great joys in life. Pulling a paddle is utterly sterile - however impressive the result may be.

25 March 2010

I totally totally agree. If you want a play station, buy a play station.

25 March 2010

[quote eseaton]I am certain that there is a close corralation between the 10% of customers Ferrari say are chosing a manual gearbox and the people who are actually buying a Ferrari for the right reasons.[/quote]

I dont doubt that modern autos, double clutch boxes, and automated manuals can be made to change faster and use less fuel.

I dont care if the manual is slower. In a Ferrari it will still be fast enough. And i am not interested in the last tenth of a second on a track. I just feel changing gear with a stick and a clutch is part of the driving experience and not one i want to give up.

Even if its only 10% Ferrari need to keep on offering the manual option. If they go auto only, they might as well introduce a diesel engine next.

25 March 2010

In my opinion make much more sense driving a Ferrari with F1 similar gearbox, than with classic manual one.

25 March 2010

Now on my 3rd car with a flappy paddle gearchange. Out of 38 cars so far only two - a 1750 Spider and a Civic Type R have given genuine pleasure in changing gear the rest have been no different than flicking a paddle. That might say a lot about the rest but they do include a high proportion of Autocar's favourite drivers cars.

I tend to find those who howl loudest about flappy paddles are those who believe everything they read and have never tried DSG/DDCT/F1/Cambiocorsa/Selespeed etc.

Just an observation you understand.

25 March 2010

It is clear to see that there are two schools of thought on the forum, and I would certainly not suggest denying flappers the pleasure of using their flaps (whatever that may be).

I am not some manual weirdo - I actually usually drive autos. When they are good I love them. I have had DSG, which was sort of impressive, but really annoying as well. My F1 experience about 3 years ago was just terrible.

I certainly agree that there have been many poor gearboxes (of all types) built, but I still can't see how it is ever going to be possible to derive any pleasure or sense of achievement from using a flap.

The people who make them have only a twofold quest - to make the change instant and seemless, and the make the outside world thing that there is a master at the wheel.

As I see it, as long as both remain available, everyone can be happy.

25 March 2010

Well done Ferrari - the world hasn't gone completey mad just yet it appears.

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