Currently reading: Exclusive: AMG's hot baby saloon
B-class based model will get performance variant with supercharged V6
Autocar
News
2 mins read
26 March 2010

Mercedes-Benz’s AMG division is planning to launch an indirect successor to the classic 190E 2.5-16 Evolution II by the middle of the decade.

The new four-door, which will rival the forthcoming Audi RS3 and BMW M1, will become the range-topper for a new model based on the next B-class. The car’s size and proportions were previewed by the F800 Style concept (pictured) at the Geneva show.

See pictures of the Mercedes F800 concept car

Set to slot into the AMG line-up below the next-gen C63 AMG, the new saloon, codenamed C117 EVO, will itself be influenced by the next CLS. It will have a coupe-like profile, taut surfacing overlaid with prominent crease lines, four frameless doors and a separate boot.

Overall length shouldn’t be more than 4500mm, placing it in the same-sized class as the 190E Evo II from 1990.

But while that car used a 2.5-litre four-cylinder motor fettled by Cosworth, the new car will get a supercharged 3.2-litre V6 that is already undergoing bench testing at AMG’s headquarters.

The new engine is based on the new M276, a turbocharged 3.5-litre V6 which will power the new CLS350. Instead of a turbocharger, the AMG version uses an electrically operated pressure wave supercharger. Insiders hint it will make close to 400bhp in production trim.

Also under development at Volkswagen, the pressure-wave blower uses pressure waves from the exhaust gas to boost the induction. AMG intends to use this idea in larger V6s and possibly V8s.

Up until now the pressure-wave process has been used mainly in large earth-moving and marine diesel engines, although Ferrari did look seriously at applying it to its Formula One engines in the early 1980s.

The transmission for the AMG model is unknown, although all of the other versions of the car will be available with a seven-speed double-clutch gearbox.

While less powerful versions of the saloon will be front-wheel drive - the car’s platform is based on the MFA chassis that will also be used in the next A-class - Mercedes insiders have confirmed to Autocar that four-wheel drive will be available as an option on selected models.

It is expected that AMG will use that four-wheel drive system to provide a rear- biased power split, giving the hot version the feeling of a true rear-wheel-drive car.

Like the CLS estate, the saloon is part of Mercedes’ drive to attract a new, younger generation of buyers to its models. The firm is hoping that the AMG version will serve the same purpose for the performance brand.

Greg Kable

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Samiur Rahman SHAH 28 March 2010

Re: Exclusive: AMG's hot baby saloon

Rover P6 3500S wrote:
Nope, I used to be able to power oversteer a pushbike! Like in a car, don't go into a corner at the right speed, don't even go in too fast. Go in WAY, WAY too fast. And, as you're on two wheels, lean right into the corner. You'll be virtually on your rear tyre sidewall and it'll be struggling for grip.

Works better on a mountain bike with knobbly tires. And you have to have your weight right on the seat. It's a hairy sensation I can assure you! I've managed to "equalise" the wear on my rear tire within an afternoon of powersliding in front of my parents house.

fuzzybear 27 March 2010

Re: Exclusive: AMG's hot baby saloon

This car is a piece of art, quite an achievement considering its just a baby merc and its in oh so predictable silver..but still - if any car can reinvent silver to make it look cool again, this can

Rover P6 3500S 25 March 2010

Re: Exclusive: AMG's hot baby saloon

Challenger440 wrote:
Yep, but me thinks you had internal combustion power at your disposal - I was on a Push Bike(!) I never mastered power oversteer on a push bike - the cadence effect of pedalling make it quite difficult...

Nope, I used to be able to power oversteer a pushbike! Like in a car, don't go into a corner at the right speed, don't even go in too fast. Go in WAY, WAY too fast. And, as you're on two wheels, lean right into the corner. You'll be virtually on your rear tyre sidewall and it'll be struggling for grip.

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