New Defender family has potential to out-sell Toyota Hilux, says brand chief
9 April 2012

The all-new Land Rover Defender family, due in 2015, could become the marque's biggest-selling model, according to brand boss John Edwards. The firm is targeting the success of the Toyota Hilux, which sold 549,000 units worldwide in 2011.

Today’s Defender sold just under 20,000 units. Edwards says Land Rover is being “encouraged to look at it as a 20-year plan with global potential”.

The new Defender will be developed into a line-up with “wide appeal and a low cost base”, and Edwards’ ambition is “to become a global maker, not a UK maker selling globally”.

The clear signal that the new model needs both a low cost base and a global manufacturing footprint suggests that the majority of new Defenders will be built outside the UK.

The company also seems serious about making the new model genuinely in the mould of the original. “We’re talking to sub-Saharan Africa buyers about cost of ownership and ease of maintenance,” Edwards added. “That it’s functional, durable and affordable are central to our thoughts. The engineers and designers are really getting engaged.”

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Our Verdict

Land Rover Defender

The Land Rover Defender is an institution and unbeatable off road, if crude on it

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11

9 April 2012

Let's try this in the correct thread this time... Never mind sub-saharan Africa they need to sort out getting some market share beyond the suburbs in Australia; I'm currently on a campsite in South Australia where there are 7 Land Cruisers, 3 Patrols and a Ford F150, i've not seen a Land Rover product since I got clear of a reasonable distance of Melbourne. Spent a day bush bashing and all I saw were Land Cruisers or Patrols, with a couple of Hi-Luxes and some other smaller utes. As I keep saying Land Rover need a decent 3-4 litre diesel that has a MGVM of 3450kg, and the ability to go to 4350kg, with a payload of about 1300kg as stock. Decent reliable diesel engine with 6 or 8 cylinders, that's low tech enough that it doesn't need massive diagnostics to fix it, and capable of 400,000km in it's lifetime; fuel economy of about 14l/100km or better (that would put it on par with a 200 series Land Cruiser) Idealy live axles front and rear rather than IFS at the front. Option of diff locks and wash out interior would be popular as well. If they can do that then they'd start to get back into Australia beyond the cities. Even if they have to buy in a diesel from somewhere, Cummins or someone similar spring to mind, or fit Isuzu diesel engines again, as the service network beyond the cities is in place.

9 April 2012

Not quite in the Bahar league for dreaming but getting that way . The Hilux is not that great cross country but it is reliable they also have many dealerships in many countries and parts are easy to come by and not extortionate .

LR need a major change from poncy expensive dealerships and servicing and repairs if they are to acheive this aim without even mentioning a poor reputation or reliability .

The DC100 will make more money as a blinged up school runner than it ever will as a commercial vehicle .

9 April 2012

Unlikely, unless they make a 3rd world specific model - like Toyota. You can still buy land cruiser and hilux with a simple non emmision standard engine, they work and can be fixed.

Landrover do have an engine that would work, the 200/300tdi was a great engine, if updated to a 3.0l with a little more power it would be perfect for the Africa spec version and have a Euro 6 engine for other places.

The modern Hilux is losing the plot, since they swithched to IFS it's not a patch on the old one so there is a gap in the maket (ironically being filled by the Tata pick up). If you want a really tough machine for Africa, you need the Landcruiser FJ76 with the I6 4.2 diesel. Simple, reliable and with the live axles it workes off road and it's what I drive in Africa. I would prefer a Mk1 Discovery if I could get one for the comfort, the modern one is too big/expensive/complex.

9 April 2012

[quote chris1969]I would prefer a Mk1 Discovery if I could get one for the comfort,[/quote]

You'll get comfort, all right, and expensive monthly repair bills. It must rank among the worst for warranty claims and lemon collections.

9 April 2012

You know what LA, that's probably generally accurate. But my next door neighbour has a 3 door Disco MK1, and it's not broken down in the three years since I've been her neighbour. I was asking her about it the other week, when we had snow and she said she's never had any problems with it. Apparently they imported it from Australia a few years ago.

I tell you what though, it leaks oil or fuel pretty much on the road outside the house everyday so I'm surprised. Not sure how many miles it does but she works about half a mile away yet drives there. Certainly not enough for it to warm up properly. But apparently it's been faultless. It's an N reg and she says she'll drive it until it dies.

9 April 2012

[quote Evo_ermine]I tell you what though, it leaks oil or fuel pretty much on the road outside the house everyday [/quote]

A standard weakness.

There were 12 different oil leaks on mine. I almost added that to my post but there were so many iffy parts and half-done development I left history to stay in the present. Your neighbour can see it. "Faultless" covers engine and sump. Knowing the San Francisco dealer, his mechanics and he gave me inside information on the lemon that was Disco but quite a number of clients had them on a business lease; out of warranty, trade it for a better one. Early ones still around might be patched up but there were so many faults one is bound to recur.

Mine started every time but still cost a couple thousands dollars a few times a year fixing surprising problems: dash twisting in 80 degree sunshine, rear view mirror drops off windscreen, rebellious ECU, rattles, intrusion of braking aids on hard bends, ad infinitum, bought second-hand.

As for the DC100, if offered with independently articulated wheels for rough terrain use, and a basic version with a hose down interior, plus all-in-one livery, it will sell well in every country in the EU. I admire the honeycomb rear pillars, ("lifted" from a Volvo concept?) good for reversing and that blind spot.

9 April 2012

The early diesel with no electronics was the best. I had a few with over 200,000 miles and one with 325,000 miles (300tdi) and they just kept going. Door locks and electric window let it down but the basic mechanical bits seemed to work.

Going back the original point, if it's to be sold in Africa to replace the Hilux it has to be simple and due to european regulation, it couldn't be European spec.

10 April 2012

[quote Paddler Ed]Never mind sub-saharan Africa they need to sort out getting some market share beyond the suburbs in Australia[/quote]

I didn't see any Land Rovers anywhere when I was last in Australia (Brisbane and Toowoomba). Everyone drove Toyota Land Cruisers or Nissan Patrols because they could be relied upon.

LR will not succeed in Australia until it gets its woeful reliability sorted out.

14 April 2012

[quote Autocar]The all-new Land Rover Defender family, due in 2015, could become the marque's biggest-selling model, according to brand boss John Edwards. The firm is targeting the success of the Toyota Hilux, which sold 549,000 units worldwide in 2011.[/quote] dream on guys.... although you might be in with a chance if you make them out of candy the size of jelly beans

15 April 2012

so, they couldnt cope with the launch orders for the evoque (which were less than the 'dissapointing' sales of the Defender) with huge delays and pushed back build slots/dodgy quality issues etc and they intend to ramp up production 20 fold in 2 years how exactly?

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