Race-fix punishment to be handed out today
21 September 2009

Motorsport's governing body will decide Renault's fate in the race-fixing controversy today.

Renault officials must answer charges from the FIA that it deliberately caused an accident in last year's Singapore Grand Prix to bring out a safety car that would help Fernando Alonso win the race.

Renault has already said that it will not contest the charges, and faces a punishment that could extend to total exclusion from the championship. The men involved in the alleged plot - team principal Flavio Briatore and director of engineering Pat Symonds - left the team last week.

In a fresh twist, Fernando Alonso has also been summoned to appear at the hearing. Although there is no suggestion the Spaniard knew about hsi team's plans, he is expected to be questioned during the hearing.

Autosport.com is also reporting that it is highly likely that talks have taken place between Renault representatives and the FIA in recent days ahead of the hearing, in order to work out which course of action would be best to minimise the chances of a severe penalty.

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7

21 September 2009

well, my view is that Renault won't be so hardlu treated for that... the FIA would have too much to loose by making felling over beaten... remember that no other main carmaker is as much involved in motorsport so far... Imagine no more clio cups, junior cups, formula renault, no ready to race rally car, no WS by Renault... who would be the loooser then?????

21 September 2009

[quote zmirlif]well, my view is that Renault won't be so hardlu treated for that... the FIA would have too much to loose by making felling over beaten... remember that no other main carmaker is as much involved in motorsport so far... Imagine no more clio cups, junior cups, formula renault, no ready to race rally car, no WS by Renault... who would be the loooser then?????[/quote]

The FIA would be setting a dangerous precedent if they Renault off leniently. While I do think the Renault team deserves a penalty more severe than the $100million fine dealt to McLaren, I think this might not be the case this time. Yes, it's unfair if it happens. But such is life. FIA is also running the risk of losing all of its (remaining) credibility and moral leadership as a governing body if it does not give a fair judgement. The punishment must fit the crime.

Being heavily involved in motorsport is no defence. On contrary, Renault has a long and proud history in motorsport. They knew the rules and they broke them. Let them suffer the consequences.

The FIA should also take a long hard look at itself. They received information on this matter last year and didn't act on it until the whole thing came to public light recently. I still think that the FIA would have been much much more proactive if it were McLaren that were in question. If it were ferrari, there would have been no investigation at all.

One last thing, Carlos Gracia, the head of the Spanish Motorsports federation, is a complete and utter disgrace!!!!!!!!!

21 September 2009

A suspended two year ban, what a complete whitewash.

If that had been Mclaren (particularly with Ron Dennis at the helm) they'd have been banned forever.

21 September 2009

I hope the FIA will be as forgiving as they have been in this instance when other teams are in a similar position.

21 September 2009

No, as reported on te news, Renault are an engine supplier and if they'd been banned straight away then most of the grid would not be on the next start line on Sunday, so most surviving cars would have either a Mercedes engine or a Ferrari one and we don't want that do we?.Ihowever agree that a suitable fine in proportion to the offence would have been seen by the public that this offence was taken seriously, after all this was just as serious as "Mclarengate", money troubles or not a fine WAS in order in my opinion.

Peter Cavellini.

21 September 2009

[quote Peter Cavellini]No, as reported on te news, Renault are an engine supplier and if they'd been banned straight away then most of the grid would not be on the next start line on Sunday, so most surviving cars would have either a Mercedes engine or a Ferrari one and we don't want that do we?[/quote]

FIA would allow the teams to run Renault engines until the end of the season. that has nothing to do with Renault being banned or not.

21 September 2009

the way saw it was, in that kind of game, each side has weapons, arguments, and in the renault side, the fact that no other manufacturer match then in motorsport means that:

give us a too strong sentence, and then, i stop all that , a guy like Ghosn souln't have sleep problems with this kind of eveally decision...so now, i can see the FIA guys had also that in there mind....(sorry for some typing fault, i'm just a ordinary french guy...)

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